Special Issue "Congenital Heart Disease: Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Management"

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. P. Syamasundar Rao

UT-Houston McGovern Medical School, 6410 Fannin Street, UTPB Suite #425, Houston, TX 77030, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 713 500 5738
Fax: +1 713 500 5751
Interests: congenital heart disease; pediatric cardiology; tricuspid atresia; physiologically advantageous ventricular septal defect; interventional pediatric cardiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are anatomic malformations of the heart or great vessels that develop during the intrauterine period; however, age at presentation of CHD may vary. The prevalence of CHD is approximately 0.8% of live births.  Approximately 50% of these children may be treated with simple medications, observation, and follow-up, without any major intervention. Nevertheless, the remaining half of the patients required surgical intervention in the past. Since the advent of percutaneous, trans-catheter techniques, half of these babies (i.e., 25% of the total) can be treated with less invasive, trans-catheter interventions. Progress in the diagnosis and management of CHD, such as early detection of newborns with serious CHD, rapid transportation of these babies to tertiary care institutions, accessibility to highly sensitive invasive and non-invasive diagnostic tools, improvements in neonatal care and anaesthesia, innovations in trans-catheter interventions, and application of complex surgical procedures to the neonates and young infants, have progressed to such a degree that the majority of CHDs may be diagnosed and “corrected”. The CHDs that are not amenable for correction are effectively palliated. Developments in medical, surgical, and trans-catheter methods began in the late 1930s and have continued to occur to the present time.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to bring together recent advances in the diagnosis and management of congenital heart defects, presenting them to the attention of interested physicians, paediatricians, cardiologists, and surgeons.

Prof. Dr. P. Syamasundar Rao
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • congenital heart disease
  • echocardiography
  • magnetic resonance imaging
  • computed tomography
  • balloon valvuloplasty
  • balloon angioplasty
  • trans-catheter occlusion of heart defects
  • ventricular septal defect
  • pulmonary stenosis
  • coarctation of the aorta

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Open AccessArticle Management of Congenital Heart Disease: State of the Art; Part I—ACYANOTIC Heart Defects
Received: 4 February 2019 / Revised: 2 March 2019 / Accepted: 5 March 2019 / Published: 8 March 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (30257 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Since the description of surgery for patent ductus arteriosus in late 1930s, an innumerable number of advances have taken place in the management of congenital heart defects (CHDs). In this review the current status of treatment of seven of the most common acyanotic [...] Read more.
Since the description of surgery for patent ductus arteriosus in late 1930s, an innumerable number of advances have taken place in the management of congenital heart defects (CHDs). In this review the current status of treatment of seven of the most common acyanotic CHDs was reviewed. The discussion included indications for, and timing of, intervention and methods of intervention. The indications are, by and large, determined by the severity of the lesion. Pressure gradients in obstructive lesions and the magnitude of the shunt in left-to-right shunt lesions are used to assess the severity of the lesion. The timing of intervention is different for each lesion and largely dependent upon when the criteria for indications for intervention were met. Appropriate medical management is necessary in most patients. Trans-catheter methods are preferable in some defects while surgery is a better option in some other defects. The currently available medical, trans-catheter, and surgical methods to treat acyanotic CHD are feasible, safe, and effective. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessReview Management of Congenital Heart Disease: State of the Art—Part II—Cyanotic Heart Defects
Received: 17 February 2019 / Revised: 15 March 2019 / Accepted: 29 March 2019 / Published: 4 April 2019
PDF Full-text (20636 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this review management of the most common cyanotic congenital heart defects (CHDs) was discussed; the management of acyanotic CHD was reviewed in Part I of this series. While the need for intervention in acyanotic CHD is by and large determined by the [...] Read more.
In this review management of the most common cyanotic congenital heart defects (CHDs) was discussed; the management of acyanotic CHD was reviewed in Part I of this series. While the need for intervention in acyanotic CHD is by and large determined by the severity of the lesion, most cyanotic CHDs require intervention, mostly by surgery. Different types of tetralogy of Fallot require different types of total surgical corrective procedures, and some may require initial palliation, mainly by modified Blalock–Taussig shunts. Babies with transposition of the great arteries with an intact ventricular septum as well as those with ventricular septal defects (VSD) need an arterial switch (Jatene) procedure while those with both VSD and pulmonary stenosis should be addressed by Rastelli procedure. These procedures may need to be preceded by prostaglandin infusion and/or balloon atrial septostomy in some babies. Infants with tricuspid atresia require initial palliation either with a modified Blalock–Taussig shunt or banding of the pulmonary artery and subsequent staged Fontan (bidirectional Glenn and fenestrated Fontan with extra-cardiac conduit). Neonates with total anomalous pulmonary venous connection are managed by anastomosis of the common pulmonary vein with the left atrium either electively in non-obstructed types or as an emergency procedure in the obstructed types. Babies with truncus arteriosus are treated by surgical closure of VSD along with right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit. The other defects, namely, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum, double-outlet right ventricle, double-inlet left ventricle and univentricular hearts largely require multistage surgical correction. The currently existing medical, trans-catheter and surgical techniques to manage cyanotic CHD are safe and effective and can be performed at a relatively low risk. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview Status of Pediatric Cardiac Care in Developing Countries
Received: 30 January 2019 / Revised: 17 February 2019 / Accepted: 20 February 2019 / Published: 25 February 2019
PDF Full-text (203 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
About 1.35 million babies are born with congenital heart disease each year globally. Most of these are expected to lead normal, productive lives if they are treated in time. However, 90% of babies born with congenital heart disease live in regions where medical [...] Read more.
About 1.35 million babies are born with congenital heart disease each year globally. Most of these are expected to lead normal, productive lives if they are treated in time. However, 90% of babies born with congenital heart disease live in regions where medical care is inadequate or unavailable. The privilege of early diagnosis and timely intervention is restricted to only those born in developed countries. Added to the burden of congenital heart disease is rheumatic heart disease, which remains a global health problem in many low-income and middle-income countries. Providing optimal care for all these children is a daunting task, and requires funds and proper planning at various levels of the health care system. This article describes the burden of pediatric heart disease, including lacunae in the current state, as well as challenges and opportunities for providing optimal care to this large population of children. Full article

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessCommentary A Primer on Multimodal Imaging and Cardiology-Radiology Congenital Heart Interface
Received: 4 March 2019 / Revised: 12 April 2019 / Accepted: 17 April 2019 / Published: 23 April 2019
PDF Full-text (1671 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pediatric cardiology imaging laboratories in the present day have several modalities for imaging of congenital and acquired cardiovascular disease. These modalities include echocardiography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, cardiac computed tomography and nuclear imaging. The utility and limitations of multimodal imaging is described herein [...] Read more.
Pediatric cardiology imaging laboratories in the present day have several modalities for imaging of congenital and acquired cardiovascular disease. These modalities include echocardiography, cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, cardiac computed tomography and nuclear imaging. The utility and limitations of multimodal imaging is described herein along with a framework for establishing a cardiology-radiology interface. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Children EISSN 2227-9067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top