Special Issue "Leukemia and Other Types of Cancer in Childhood. Medical and Nursing Care Issues for the Improvement of Young Patients’ Quality of Life"

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Oncology and Hematology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Pantelis Perdikaris
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, University of Peloponnese, 23100 Sparta, Greece
Interests: pediatric oncology nursing; pediatric pain relief; pediatric nursing; quality of life for pediatric patients with chronic diseases; oral mucositis in pediatric patients; care of central and peripheral venous catheters in pediatric patients

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer in children and adolescents, although a relatively rare disease, is the second most common cause of death in childhood. In recent decades, a tremendous progress of new, intensive anticancer treatments as well as supportive care has improved the survival rate and prognosis and decreased mortality dramatically for children and adolescents with cancer. Even though the cure rates are higher than ever, the diagnosis and therapy of cancer in pediatric patients is still a very stressful procedure. Children with cancer deal with several stressful conditions related to cancer treatment on a daily basis. The most commonly reported are the need for hospitalization, pain, immobilization, and the aggressiveness of the treatments. These factors may have a negative impact on young patients’ quality of life.

In terms of helping children and teenagers with cancer to improve their quality of life as patients and survivors as well, we focus on medical and nursing care issues that can foster young patients to cope with the disease and its complications. The focus of this Special Issue is on the ways that medical and nursing care issues of young patients with leukemia and other types of cancer in childhood may affect their quality of life as inpatients, outpatients, and survivors. Increasing our knowledge in this topic will assist us in developing evidence-based guidelines or recommendations for the improvement of quality of life in children and adolescents with malignancies.

This issue will include original research and reviews on the relationship between nursing and medical topics and quality of life in young patients suffering from leukemia and other types of cancer. This can include epidemiological studies of the association between anticancer treatments and complications or side-effects, palliative and supportive therapy/care, and new drugs and studies examining factors associated with medical and nursing care that can help children and adolescents with cancer to gain a better quality of life.

Dr. Pantelis Perdikaris
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Leukemia
  • Quality of life
  • Children
  • Adolescents
  • Treatment
  • Palliative care
  • Nursing care
  • Medical care
  • Supportive care
  • Pediatric cancer
  • Cancer
  • Complications
  • Mucositis
  • Pain

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Large Population Analysis of Secondary Cancers in Pediatric Leukemia Survivors
Children 2019, 6(12), 130; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6120130 - 29 Nov 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3132
Abstract
Introduction: Survivors of childhood cancer have an increased risk of developing a subsequent secondary malignant neoplasm (SMN). Among five-year survivors of primary cancer, SMNs account for nearly half of non-relapse deaths, which make them the most frequent cause of non-relapse mortality. Leukemia is [...] Read more.
Introduction: Survivors of childhood cancer have an increased risk of developing a subsequent secondary malignant neoplasm (SMN). Among five-year survivors of primary cancer, SMNs account for nearly half of non-relapse deaths, which make them the most frequent cause of non-relapse mortality. Leukemia is the most common childhood cancer and the five-year survival rate of leukemia has drastically improved over the past two decades. Therefore, the chances of developing SMNs are higher in pediatric (0–19 years) leukemia survivors. Methods: The US based Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER-18) database (1973–2014) was probed for SMNs in the pediatric population (age ≤ 19). Variables Sequence-number central, primary site and ICCC3WHO were used to identify the first and second cancers among patients who developed SMN. Results: Our SEER database analysis found 99,380 cases of pediatric primary malignancies (0–19 years), of which 1803 (1.81%) patients developed SMN. The breakdown of SMNs in pediatric leukemia survivors (n = 251) showed thyroid carcinoma (18.33% of cases) as the most common second cancer, followed by sarcoma (15.14%), astrocytoma (10.36%), lymphoma (9.56%), salivary gland carcinoma (7.17%), melanoma (4.38%), and breast cancer (3.98%). Interestingly, we found that over 76% of SMNs that were developed by leukemia patients occurred within 20 years after initial leukemia diagnosis. However, some SMNs occur during later age, for example, the mean age for breast cancer occurrence in leukemia survivors is 26.20 ± 8.53 years after initial leukemia diagnosis. Conclusions: Our study presented comprehensive rates of SMNs among pediatric cancers survivors, and the potential SMNs for pediatric leukemia survivors. This information could we used by oncologists, patients, patient families, and cancer researchers to understand the long-term risks that are associated with the development of SMNs in pediatric leukemia survivors. Full article
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Review

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Review
Researching the Experiences of Children with Cancer: Considerations for Practice
Children 2019, 6(8), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6080093 - 16 Aug 2019
Viewed by 2491
Abstract
Children and adolescents with cancer often participate in medical and psychosocial research throughout their diagnosis and treatment. Furthermore, this involvement frequently extends into the survivorship period. Sometimes referred to as “doubly vulnerable” research participants, children and adolescents with cancer are not only minors, [...] Read more.
Children and adolescents with cancer often participate in medical and psychosocial research throughout their diagnosis and treatment. Furthermore, this involvement frequently extends into the survivorship period. Sometimes referred to as “doubly vulnerable” research participants, children and adolescents with cancer are not only minors, but also minors facing significant medical, developmental, and psychosocial stressors associated with chronic illness. Thus, it is important to exercise care in designing and conducting research with this population; however, these considerations have not been adequately addressed in pediatric healthcare literature. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to describe the research preferences and experiences of children and adolescents with cancer to identify techniques for supporting this population as research participants. By incorporating developmentally appropriate, context-specific, and child-centered adjustments, researchers can help children and adolescents with cancer effectively and meaningfully describe their illness experiences while also developing a positive outlook on future research participation. Full article
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