Children with Reading Difficulties: How to Intervene and Treat?

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Neurology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 March 2024) | Viewed by 2655

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Catholic University of Milan, Milan, Italy
Interests: developmental psychology; reading disorders
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Education, Languages, Intercultures, Literatures and Psychology, University of Florence, 50129 Florence, Italy
Interests: language disorder; specific learning disorder; cognitive rehabilitation; home-based interventions; assessment; empowerment and rehabilitation of executive functions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Reading difficulties influence pupils’ performance in most academic domains. Moreover, children who struggle in developing literacy often experience low self-esteem, low-motivation, and are afraid to be involved in school activities, due to the anticipation of their own failure. Due to these negative feelings, poor readers and children with dyslexia are likely to manifest internalizing symptoms and problems in their relationships with their peers. Taking into consideration the high percentage of children with reading difficulties, irrespective of their native language, along with the impact of such difficulties on both academic performance and well-being, the need for effective intervention programs to support pupils in learning to read and achieve in-text comprehension is evident. Therefore, the aim of this Special Issue is to provide an updated overview on evidence-based interventions and treatments, which can be implemented both in person and in telerehabilitation conditions, in order to improve literacy in children and adolescents.

Prof. Daniela Traficante
Prof. Chiara Pecini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • reading difficulties
  • intervention
  • treatment
  • literacy

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

14 pages, 2101 KiB  
Article
Influence of Lexical Development on Reading and Spelling Skills: Effects of Enhancement on Second-Grade Children in Primary School
by Oriana Incognito, Alice Mercugliano and Lucia Bigozzi
Children 2023, 10(8), 1416; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10081416 - 19 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2037
Abstract
Previous studies suggest that lexical competence is an important factor that influences reading skills and spelling accuracy in primary school children. Understanding the relationship between these skills will provide valuable insights to improve reading and writing enhancement and intervention strategies. The aim of [...] Read more.
Previous studies suggest that lexical competence is an important factor that influences reading skills and spelling accuracy in primary school children. Understanding the relationship between these skills will provide valuable insights to improve reading and writing enhancement and intervention strategies. The aim of this pre-post longitudinal study is to examine the effectiveness of an enhancement program, in which there are activities proposed through a narrative and metacognitive methodology, designed to develop the cognitive processes of lexical acquisition and its effects on reading and writing ability. A total of 74 primary school children (M-age = 7.04 years) participated in the research. They were divided into groups: experimental, which carried out the enhancement, and control groups, which carried out the typical school program. The results show that children who carried out the enhancement obtained higher scores in reading skills, specifically in reading accuracy and text comprehension and spelling accuracy, in comparison with their peers in the control group. These results suggest that strengthening the lexical semantic pathway, as theorized by Coltheart’s two-way model, can lead to improved reading comprehension and diminished reading errors and spelling inaccuracies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Children with Reading Difficulties: How to Intervene and Treat?)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop