Special Issue "Ceramics for Biomedical Applications"

A special issue of Ceramics (ISSN 2571-6131).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Laurent Gremillard

Materials: Engineering and Science Laboratory, Univ-Lyon, INSA Lyon, CNRS, France
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Interests: biomaterials; ceramics
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jérôme Chevalier

Materials Science Department, MATEIS, University of Lyon, INSA-LYON, UMR CNRS 5510, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biomaterials; ceramics; mechanics of materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of ceramics for biomedical applications keeps increasing, as does the number of bioceramic systems being studied in our laboratories. The ecosystem of bioceramics is now much richer than it was 20 or 30 years ago, thanks, in particular, to the development of third-generation biomaterials that combine materials and biological factor to elicit faster healing. However, extensive research on third-generation bioceramics must not omit the first and second generations that are still very much in use and even in growing volumes. Indeed, bioinert ceramics now possess the right properties to replace metals in many load-bearing applications where tribology is an issue. In most cases, bioactive ceramics are now bioactive enough to replace the “gold standard” autologous bone grafts.

Ceramics wishes to publish a Special Issue establishing a state of the art on the research on these three generations of bioceramics. Short communications, full articles and reviews are welcome on any of the following topics (non-exhaustive list):

  • Oxide and non-oxide ceramics and composites for joint replacement: processing, mechanical properties, durability, biocompatibility;
  • Ceramics, glasses and glass ceramics for dental applications: processing, mechanical properties, optical properties, joining, surface treatments;
  • Ceramics, glasses and composites for bone replacement, bone healing or tissue engineering, including cements, organic-inorganic composites, drug-loaded materials;
  • Ceramic and glass coatings for improved biological interactions: new processes, innovative compositions, coatings on metals or polymers;
  • Ceramic nanoparticles for biological applications: drug delivery devices, contrast agents;
  • Novel processing methods for bioceramics: novel syntheses routes, additive fabrication, methods for production of architectured ceramics;
  • Novel testing methods for bioceramics: progresses in mimicking the biological environment of bioceramics, combined mechanical, chemical and biological solicitations.

Dr. Laurent Gremillard
Prof. Jérôme Chevalier
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Ceramics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biological interactions
  • bone filling
  • dental
  • joint replacement
  • bioceramics and glasses
  • processing
  • characterization
  • properties

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Functionalization of Hydroxyapatite Ceramics: Raman Mapping Investigation of Silanization
Ceramics 2019, 2(2), 372-384; https://doi.org/10.3390/ceramics2020029
Received: 19 April 2019 / Revised: 8 May 2019 / Accepted: 16 May 2019 / Published: 22 May 2019
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Abstract
Surface modification of bioceramic materials by covalent immobilization of biomolecules is a promising way to improve their bioactivity. This approach implies the use of organic anchors to introduce functional groups on the inorganic surface on which the biomolecules will be immobilized. In this [...] Read more.
Surface modification of bioceramic materials by covalent immobilization of biomolecules is a promising way to improve their bioactivity. This approach implies the use of organic anchors to introduce functional groups on the inorganic surface on which the biomolecules will be immobilized. In this process, the density and surface distribution of biomolecules, and in turn the final biological properties, are strongly influenced by those of the anchors. We propose a new approach based on Raman 2D mapping to evidence the surface distribution of organosilanes, frequently used as anchors on biomaterial surfaces on hydroxyapatite and silicated hydroxyapatite ceramics. Unmodified and silanized ceramic surfaces were characterized by means of contact angle measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman mapping. Contact angle measurements and AFM topographies confirmed the surface modification. Raman mapping highlighted the influence of both the ceramic’s composition and silane functionality (i.e., the number of hydrolysable groups) on the silane surface distribution. The presence of hillocks was shown, evidencing a polymerization and/or an aggregation of the molecules whatever the silane and the substrates were. The substitution of phosphate groups by silicate groups affects the covering, and the spots are more intense on SiHA than on HA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramics for Biomedical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Evidence of Phase Transitions and Their Role in the Transient Behavior of Mechanical Properties and Low Temperature Degradation of 3Y-TZP Made from Stabilizer-Coated Powder
Ceramics 2019, 2(2), 271-285; https://doi.org/10.3390/ceramics2020022
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 21 March 2019 / Accepted: 26 March 2019 / Published: 3 April 2019
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Abstract
The substance 3 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) has become a commodity for the manufacture of components in biomedical and engineering applications. Materials made from stabilizer-coated rather than co-precipitated starting powders are known for their superior toughness and low temperature ageing resistance. The [...] Read more.
The substance 3 mol% yttria stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) has become a commodity for the manufacture of components in biomedical and engineering applications. Materials made from stabilizer-coated rather than co-precipitated starting powders are known for their superior toughness and low temperature ageing resistance. The reason for this phenomenon is however still not fully understood. In this study, 3Y-TZP materials hot pressed at 1300–1450 °C for 1 h were characterized. It was found that at a sintering temperature of 1375 °C, a transition from fine grain to coarse grain microstructure associated with a shift from tough and ageing resistant to brittle and prone to ageing was observed. The detailed analysis of the phase composition by X-ray diffraction revealed that TZPs consists of up to five crystallographically different phases of zirconia simultaneously whose contents dynamically change with sintering temperature. At low sintering temperature, the predominant phases are a tetragonal phase with low yttria content and large domain size and high tetragonality together with a cubic phase of high yttria content. At high temperature, a tetragonal phase of higher yttria content and lower tetragonality is formed together with a cubic phase of lower yttria content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramics for Biomedical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Coatings Based on Organic/Non-Organic Composites on Bioinert Ceramics by Using Biomimetic Co-Precipitation
Ceramics 2019, 2(2), 260-270; https://doi.org/10.3390/ceramics2020021
Received: 20 February 2019 / Revised: 21 March 2019 / Accepted: 1 April 2019 / Published: 3 April 2019
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Abstract
Bioinert ceramics have been commonly used in the field of orthopedic and dentistry due to their excellent mechanical properties, esthetic look, good biocompatibility and chemical inertness. However, an activation of its bioinert surface could bring additional advantages for better implant-integration in vivo. Therefore, [...] Read more.
Bioinert ceramics have been commonly used in the field of orthopedic and dentistry due to their excellent mechanical properties, esthetic look, good biocompatibility and chemical inertness. However, an activation of its bioinert surface could bring additional advantages for better implant-integration in vivo. Therefore, we introduce an innovative biomimetic co-precipitation technique by using modified simulated body fluid (SBF) to obtain a composite coating made of organic/non-organic components. The zirconia samples were soaked in SBF containing different concentrations of protein (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 g/l). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was applied as a standard protein. During the soaking time, a precipitation of calcium phosphate took place on the substrate surfaces. The proteins were incorporated into the coating during precipitation. Morphology changes of precipitated hydroxyapatite (HAp) due to the presence of proteins were observed on SEM-images. The presence of proteins within the coating was proven by using SEM/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and immunohistochemical analysis. We conclude that it is possible to co-precipitate the organic/non-organic composite on inert ceramic by using the wet-chemistry method. In future studies, BSA could be replaced by targeted proteins appropriate to the application area. This method could create new biomaterials, the surfaces of which could be tailored according to the desires and requirements of their use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramics for Biomedical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Ammonium Hydroxide Mediated Hydrothermal Crystallization of Hydroxyapatite Coatings on Titanium Substrate
Ceramics 2019, 2(1), 180-189; https://doi.org/10.3390/ceramics2010016
Received: 1 February 2019 / Revised: 8 March 2019 / Accepted: 15 March 2019 / Published: 19 March 2019
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Abstract
Controlled growth of hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings on titanium substrate plays an important role in the fabrication of the composites for bone tissue engineering. We describe the synthesis of the crystalline hydroxyapatite coatings on the Ti/TiO2 substrate through a hydrothermal method by using [...] Read more.
Controlled growth of hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings on titanium substrate plays an important role in the fabrication of the composites for bone tissue engineering. We describe the synthesis of the crystalline hydroxyapatite coatings on the Ti/TiO2 substrate through a hydrothermal method by using ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid disodium salt (Na2EDTA) and varying concentrations of ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) in calcium-phosphate precursor solution. Na2EDTA serves as a chelating agent, while NH4OH is used as an alkaline source and crystal growth modifier. We characterized the HAp coatings using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. We also performed the elemental chemical analysis by means of a particle induced x–ray emission method. Our results show that there is a pH limit for which the hydrothermal deposition of HAp on titanium occurs. Moreover, we observed that NH4OH had a measurable influence on the coating thickness as well as on the size and shape of the HAp crystals. We found that with the increase of NH4OH concentration, the thickness of the Hap layer increases and its morphology changes from irregular flakes to well-defined hexagonal rods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramics for Biomedical Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Calcium Phosphate Powder Synthesized from Calcium Acetate and Ammonium Hydrophosphate for Bioceramics Application
Ceramics 2018, 1(2), 375-392; https://doi.org/10.3390/ceramics1020030
Received: 25 October 2018 / Revised: 7 December 2018 / Accepted: 11 December 2018 / Published: 15 December 2018
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Abstract
Calcium phosphate powder was synthesized at room temperature from aqueous solutions of ammonium hydrophosphate and calcium acetate without pH adjusting at constant Ca/P molar ratio 1.5. Phase composition of the as-synthesized powder depended on the precursors concentration: At 2.0 M of calcium acetate [...] Read more.
Calcium phosphate powder was synthesized at room temperature from aqueous solutions of ammonium hydrophosphate and calcium acetate without pH adjusting at constant Ca/P molar ratio 1.5. Phase composition of the as-synthesized powder depended on the precursors concentration: At 2.0 M of calcium acetate in the starting solution, poorly crystallized hydroxyapatite was formed, 0.125 M solution of calcium acetate afforded brushite, and the powders synthesized from 0.25–1.0 M calcium acetate solutions were mixtures of the mentioned phases. Firing at 1100 °C led to complete elimination of the reaction by-products, yet the phase composition of the annealed compacted samples was the following: When 2.0 M solution of calcium acetate was used, the obtained ceramics consisted of β-Ca3(PO4)2, whereas at 0.125 to 1.0 M of calcium acetate, the ceramics was a mixture of β-Ca3(PO4)2 and β-Ca2P2O7. Synthesized calcium phosphate powders can be used as the powdered precursors for biocompatible bioresorbable composite ceramics production. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ceramics for Biomedical Applications)
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