Special Issue "Catalytic Transformation of Renewables (Olefin, Bio-sourced, et. al)"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomass Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Nikolaos Dimitratos Website E-Mail
School of Chemistry, Cardiff Catalysis Institute, Cardiff University, Main Building, Park Place, Cardiff, Wales, CF10 3AT, UK
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis for energy; H2 production; CO2 transformation to methanol; supported metal nanoparticles; heteropolyacids; biomass conversion; bifunctional catalysts; size and shape control of metal colloids; in situ and operando spectroscopy; advanced characterisation using synchrotron and neutron techniques
Guest Editor
Prof. Stefania Albonetti Website E-Mail
Dipartimento di Chimica Industriale "Toso Montanari", Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, 40136 Bologna, Italy
Interests: metal nanoparticles; heterogeneous catalysis; nanostructured metal oxides; Heteropolyacids; biomass transformation; HMF oxidation
Guest Editor
Dr. Tommaso Tabanelli Website E-Mail
Industrial Chemistry Department “Toso Montanari”, Università di Bologna, Viale del Risorgimento 4, 40136 Bologna, Italy
Interests: catalysis; green chemistry; organic carbonates; biomass valorisation; catalytic transfer hydrogenation; selective oxidations; continuous flow processes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, a wide variety of biomass-derived chemicals have emerged as key platform chemicals for the production of fine chemicals and liquid fuels. Heterogeneous catalysts are the preferred option for most of the developed and proposed catalytic processes. A range of heterogeneous catalysts have been evaluated for effective biomass conversion, such as supported metal nanoparticles, mixed metal oxides and zeolites, where the control of particle size, porosity, acid-basic and redox properties are crucial for providing active, stable and selective heterogeneous catalysts. Moreover, the crucial role of the solvent, choice of reactor design and final chemical processes for controlling activity, selectivity and deactivation phenomena has been demonstrated.

We invite the scientific community to submit their contributions in the form of original research articles and review articles that could seek an excellent interaction between solid catalysts and their applications in biomass transformation on selected topics. We are particularly interested in articles describing:

1) Furfural transformation
2) HMF transformation
3) Bioethanol production from biomass
4) Olefin production from biomass-derived molecules
5) Deactivation studies using in situ and ex situ spectroscopic techniques
6) Computational modeling and simulation of biomass-derived processes

Dr. Nikolaos Dimitratos
Prof. Stefania Albonetti
Dr. Tommaso Tabanelli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomass transformation
  • Fine chemicals and fuels
  • Heterogeneous catalysts
  • Deactivation studies
  • In situ/operando studies

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
One-Pot Catalytic Conversion of Cellobiose to Sorbitol over Nickel Phosphides Supported on MCM-41 and Al-MCM-41
Catalysts 2019, 9(1), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9010092 - 16 Jan 2019
Abstract
MCM-41- and Al-MCM-41-supported nickel phosphide nanomaterials were synthesized at two different initial molar ratios of Ni/P: 10:2 and 10:3 and were tested as heterogeneous catalysts for the one-pot conversion of cellobiose to sorbitol. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption, [...] Read more.
MCM-41- and Al-MCM-41-supported nickel phosphide nanomaterials were synthesized at two different initial molar ratios of Ni/P: 10:2 and 10:3 and were tested as heterogeneous catalysts for the one-pot conversion of cellobiose to sorbitol. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), N2 adsorption-desorption, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), 27Al-magnetic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer (27Al MAS-NMR), temperature programmed desorption of ammonia (NH3-TPD), temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR), and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrophotometer (ICP-OES). The characterization indicated that nickel phosphide nanoparticles were successfully incorporated into both supports without destroying their hexagonal framework structures, that the catalysts contained some or all of the following Ni-containing phases: Ni0, Ni3P, and Ni12P5, and that the types and relative amounts of Ni-containing phases present in each catalyst were largely determined by the initial molar ratio of Ni/P as well as the type of support used. For cellobiose conversion at 150 °C for 3 h under 4 MPa of H2, all catalysts showed similarly high conversion of cellobiose (89.5–95.0%). Nevertheless, sorbitol yield was highly correlated to the relative amount of phases with higher content of phosphorus present in the catalysts, giving the following order of catalytic performance of the Ni-containing phases: Ni12P5 > Ni3P > Ni. Increasing the reaction temperature from 150 °C to 180 °C also led to an improvement in sorbitol yield (from 43.5% to 87.8%). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Transformation of Renewables (Olefin, Bio-sourced, et. al))
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Selective Synthesis of Furfuryl Alcohol from Biomass-Derived Furfural Using Immobilized Yeast Cells
Catalysts 2019, 9(1), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9010070 - 10 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Furfuryl alcohol (FA) is an important building block in polymer, food, and pharmaceutical industries. In this work, we reported the biocatalytic reduction of furfural, one of the top value-added bio-based platform chemicals, to FA by immobilized Meyerozyma guilliermondii SC1103 cells. The biocatalytic process [...] Read more.
Furfuryl alcohol (FA) is an important building block in polymer, food, and pharmaceutical industries. In this work, we reported the biocatalytic reduction of furfural, one of the top value-added bio-based platform chemicals, to FA by immobilized Meyerozyma guilliermondii SC1103 cells. The biocatalytic process was optimized, and the tolerance of this yeast strain toward toxic furfural was evaluated. It was found that furfural of 200 mM could be reduced smoothly to the desired product FA with the conversion of 98% and the selectivity of >98%, while the FA yield was only approximately 81%. The gap between the substrate conversion and the product yield might partially be attributed to the substantial adsorption of the immobilization material (calcium alginate) toward the desired product, but microbial metabolism of furans (as carbon sources) made a negligible contribution to it. In addition, FA of approximately 156 mM was produced within 7 h in a scale-up reaction, along with the formation of trace 2-furoic acid (1 mM) as the byproduct. The FA productivity was up to 2.9 g/L/h, the highest value ever reported in the biocatalytic synthesis of FA. The crude FA was simply separated from the reaction mixture by organic solvent extraction, with the recovery of 90% and the purity of 88%. FA as high as 266 mM was produced by using a fed-batch strategy within 15.5 h. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Transformation of Renewables (Olefin, Bio-sourced, et. al))
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
A Comparative Study of MFI Zeolite Derived from Different Silica Sources: Synthesis, Characterization and Catalytic Performance
Catalysts 2019, 9(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9010013 - 26 Dec 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
In this paper, a comparative study of MFI zeolite derived from different silica sources is presented. Dry gel conversion (DGC) method is used to synthesize silicalite-1 and ZSM-5 with MFI structure. Two kinds of silica sources with different particle sizes are used during [...] Read more.
In this paper, a comparative study of MFI zeolite derived from different silica sources is presented. Dry gel conversion (DGC) method is used to synthesize silicalite-1 and ZSM-5 with MFI structure. Two kinds of silica sources with different particle sizes are used during the synthesis of MFI zeolite. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2-sorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF). From the characterization results, it could be seen that the high-quality coffin-like silicalite-1 was synthesized using silica sphere with particle size of 300 nm as silica source, with crystallization time being shortened to 2 h. The schematic diagram of silicalite-1 formation using silica sources with different particle sizes is summarized. ZSM-5 was obtained by adding Al atoms to raw materials during the synthesis of MFI zeolite. The performance of aqueous phase eugenol hydrodeoxygenation over Pd/C-ZSM-5 catalyst is evaluated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Transformation of Renewables (Olefin, Bio-sourced, et. al))
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
The Influence of Texture on Co/SBA–15 Catalyst Performance for Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis
Catalysts 2018, 8(12), 661; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8120661 - 16 Dec 2018
Cited by 1Retraction
Abstract
The influence of the Co/SBA–15 catalyst texture, such as pore size and pore length on Fischer–Tropsch (FT) Synthesis, was investigated in this paper. The morphology, structure, and microstructures of Co/SBA–15 catalysts were characterized by SEM, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), TPR, HRTEM, and XRD. The experimental [...] Read more.
The influence of the Co/SBA–15 catalyst texture, such as pore size and pore length on Fischer–Tropsch (FT) Synthesis, was investigated in this paper. The morphology, structure, and microstructures of Co/SBA–15 catalysts were characterized by SEM, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), TPR, HRTEM, and XRD. The experimental results indicated that the increase of pore size could improve the activity of the Co/SBA–15 catalyst, and the further increase of pore size could not significantly promote the activity. Moreover, it was also found that the pore length of the Co/SBA–15 catalyst played a key role in the catalytic activity. CO2 and C4+ selectivity were 2.0% and 74% during the simulated syngas (64% H2: 32% CO: balanced N2) FT over the Co/SBA–15 catalysts, and CO conversion rate and CH4 selectivity were 10.8% and 15.7% after 100 h time on stream. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Transformation of Renewables (Olefin, Bio-sourced, et. al))
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
MPV Reduction of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol on Mg, Zr, Ti, Zr–Ti, and Mg–Ti Solids: Influence of Acid–Base Properties
Catalysts 2018, 8(11), 539; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal8110539 - 13 Nov 2018
Abstract
The Meerwein–Ponndorf–Verley (MPV) reaction is an environmentally-friendly process consisting of the reduction of a carbonyl compound through hydrogen transfer from a secondary alcohol. This work deals with MPV reduction of furfural to furfuryl alcohol on different ZrOx, MgOx, TiO [...] Read more.
The Meerwein–Ponndorf–Verley (MPV) reaction is an environmentally-friendly process consisting of the reduction of a carbonyl compound through hydrogen transfer from a secondary alcohol. This work deals with MPV reduction of furfural to furfuryl alcohol on different ZrOx, MgOx, TiOx, and Mg–Ti, as well as Zr–Ti mixed systems. The solids were synthesized through the sol–gel process and subsequently calcined at 200 °C. Characterization was performed using a wide range of techniques: ICP-MS, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, EDX, TGA-DTA, XRD, XPS, TEM, TPD of pre-adsorbed pyridine (acidity) and CO2 (basicity), DRIFT of adsorbed pyridine, and methylbutynol (MBOH) test reaction. ZrOx showed the highest conversion and selectivity values, which was attributed to the existence of acid–base pair sites (as evidenced by the MBOH test reaction), whereas the introduction of titanium resulted in the drop of both conversion and selectivity probably due to the increase in Brönsted-type acidity. As for MgOx, it had a predominantly basic character that led to the production of the condensation product of one molecule of furfural and one molecule of acetone, and thus resulted in a lower selectivity to furfuryl alcohol. The TiOx solid was found to be mainly acidic and exhibited both Lewis and Brönsted acid sites. The presence of the latter could account for the lower selectivity to furfuryl alcohol. All in all, these results seemed to suggest that the MPV reaction is favored on Lewis acid sites and especially on acid–base pair sites. The process was accelerated under microwave irradiation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Transformation of Renewables (Olefin, Bio-sourced, et. al))
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Zeolites as Acid/Basic Solid Catalysts: Recent Synthetic Developments
Catalysts 2019, 9(3), 248; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9030248 - 08 Mar 2019
Abstract
The zeolites are porous solid structures characterized by a particular framework of aluminosilicates, in which the incorporation of the Al+3 ions generates an excess of negative charge compensated by cations (usually alkali or alkali earth) or protons. In the latter case, they [...] Read more.
The zeolites are porous solid structures characterized by a particular framework of aluminosilicates, in which the incorporation of the Al+3 ions generates an excess of negative charge compensated by cations (usually alkali or alkali earth) or protons. In the latter case, they are employed as catalysts for a wide variety of reactions, such as dehydration, skeletal isomerization and cracking, while the catalytic activity of basic zeolites has not found, up to now, any industrial or whatever relevant application in chemical processes. In the present review, we firstly intend to give an overview of the fundamental chemical composition, as well as the structural features of the zeolite framework. The purpose of this paper is to analyze their key properties as acid, both Lewis and Brønsted, and basic solid support. Their application as catalysts is discussed by reviewing the already published works in that field, and a final remark of their still unexplored potential as green, mild, and selective catalyst is also reported. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Catalytic Transformation of Renewables (Olefin, Bio-sourced, et. al))
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl alcohol promoted by TiO2-Al2O3 mixed nanocluster: A DFT study
Abstract: Single (TiO2)n and (Al2O3)m oxide clusters have been studied extensively in catalysis for biofuels. However, clusters based on mixed oxides have not been reported. In this work we perform a global optimization study of the low-lying isomers of the (TiO2)5+(Al2O3)4 mixed oxide cluster. Inspired by experimental backgrounds, the proposed mixed oxide complex has fifty-fifty mass ratio i.e. 5 atomic mass units of TiO2 are equivalent to 4 units of Al2O3. Structural determination of the putative global minimum will be accompanied of a reactivity study by Fukui indexes. Catalytic versatility of proposed complex is demonstrated for conversion of furfural into furfuranol using methods based on the DFT. Hydrogenation was explicitly included studying the H2 adsorption in the complex. The conversion energetic parameters associated with the complex were compared by replacing it with the global minimum reported for the (TiO2)10 cluster.

text

1. J. Photochem. Photobiol. 353, 316 (2018).
2. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 3022 (2007).
3. J. Phys. Chem. C 121, 27483 (2017).
4. Catal. Today 277) 97-107 (2016).
5. J. Ener. Chem. 25 888–894 (2016).
6. Appl. Catal. A. 561 117-126 (2018).
7. Catalysts 2018, 8, 539

Title: Catalytic upgrading of ethanol over bifunctional Pd-Sn zeolites

Back to TopTop