Special Issue "Risk Factors for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)"

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Andrea Loftus
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Curtin Neuroscience Laboratory, School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Interests: parkinson’s disease; mild cognitive impairment; cognition; neurodegeneration; plasticity; brain stimulation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mild cognitive impairment is increasingly acknowledged as a risk factor for progression to dementia and, as such, has potential prognostic value. This Special Issue of Brain Sciences will discuss current methods (measurement, criteria) for the identification of mild cognitive impairment, and will examine potential risk factors for mild cognitive impairment. We welcome articles reviewing the identification and classification of mild cognitive impairment, describing new human and animal data, and emerging therapeutic interventions for the management of mild cognitive impairment. We hope we can count on your valuable contribution to make this a successful and impactful Special Issue for the journal.

Assoc. Prof. Andrea Loftus
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Neuropsychology
  • Dementia
  • Neurodegeneration

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Risk Factors for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(9), 117; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7090117 - 11 Sep 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
It was has been my pleasure to have acted as the guest editor for the Brain Sciences Special Issue on Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI).[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Factors for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI))

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Computer versus Compensatory Calendar Training in Individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment: Functional Impact in a Pilot Study
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(9), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7090112 - 06 Sep 2017
Cited by 6
Abstract
This pilot study examined the functional impact of computerized versus compensatory calendar training in cognitive rehabilitation participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Fifty-seven participants with amnestic MCI completed randomly assigned calendar or computer training. A standard care control group was used for comparison. [...] Read more.
This pilot study examined the functional impact of computerized versus compensatory calendar training in cognitive rehabilitation participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Fifty-seven participants with amnestic MCI completed randomly assigned calendar or computer training. A standard care control group was used for comparison. Measures of adherence, memory-based activities of daily living (mADLs), and self-efficacy were completed. The calendar training group demonstrated significant improvement in mADLs compared to controls, while the computer training group did not. Calendar training may be more effective in improving mADLs than computerized intervention. However, this study highlights how behavioral trials with fewer than 30–50 participants per arm are likely underpowered, resulting in seemingly null findings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Factors for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI))
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Open AccessArticle
Problems in Classifying Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): One or Multiple Syndromes?
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(9), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7090111 - 01 Sep 2017
Cited by 11
Abstract
As the conceptual, methodological, and technological advances applied to dementias have evolved the construct of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), one problem encountered has been its classification into subtypes. Here, we aim to revise the concept of MCI and its subtypes, addressing the problems [...] Read more.
As the conceptual, methodological, and technological advances applied to dementias have evolved the construct of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), one problem encountered has been its classification into subtypes. Here, we aim to revise the concept of MCI and its subtypes, addressing the problems of classification not only from the psychometric point of view or by using alternative methods, such as latent class analysis, but also considering the absence of normative data. In addition to the well-known influence of certain factors on cognitive function, such as educational level and cultural traits, recent studies highlight the relevance of other factors that may significantly affect the genesis and evolution of MCI: subjective memory complaints, loneliness, social isolation, etc. The present work will contemplate the most relevant attempts to clarify the issue of MCI categorization and classification, combining our own data with that from recent studies which suggest the role of relevant psychosocial factors in MCI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Factors for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI))
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Open AccessArticle
In Search of Sleep Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease: K-Complexes Do Not Discriminate between Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Healthy Controls
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(5), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7050051 - 29 Apr 2017
Cited by 13
Abstract
The K-complex (KC) is one of the hallmarks of Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep. Recent observations point to a drastic decrease of spontaneous KCs in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, no study has investigated when, in the development of AD, this phenomenon starts. The [...] Read more.
The K-complex (KC) is one of the hallmarks of Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep. Recent observations point to a drastic decrease of spontaneous KCs in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, no study has investigated when, in the development of AD, this phenomenon starts. The assessment of KC density in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a clinical condition considered a possible transitional stage between normal cognitive function and probable AD, is still lacking. The aim of the present study was to compare KC density in AD/MCI patients and healthy controls (HCs), also assessing the relationship between KC density and cognitive decline. Twenty amnesic MCI patients underwent a polysomnographic recording of a nocturnal sleep. Their data were compared to those of previously recorded 20 HCs and 20 AD patients. KCs during stage 2 NREM sleep were visually identified and KC densities of the three groups were compared. AD patients showed a significant KC density decrease compared with MCI patients and HCs, while no differences were observed between MCI patients and HCs. KC density was positively correlated with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores. Our results point to the existence of an alteration of KC density only in a full-blown phase of AD, which was not observable in the early stage of the pathology (MCI), but linked with cognitive deterioration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Factors for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI))
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Other

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Open AccessBrief Report
Brief Report: Using the Internet to Identify Persons with Cognitive Impairment for Participation in Clinical Trials
Brain Sci. 2017, 7(4), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7040036 - 05 Apr 2017
Abstract
Identifying, recruiting, and enrolling persons in clinical trials of dementia treatments is extremely difficult. One approach to first-wave screening of potential participants is the use of online assessment tools. Initial studies using the Dementia Risk Assessment (DRA)—which includes a previously validated recognition memory [...] Read more.
Identifying, recruiting, and enrolling persons in clinical trials of dementia treatments is extremely difficult. One approach to first-wave screening of potential participants is the use of online assessment tools. Initial studies using the Dementia Risk Assessment (DRA)—which includes a previously validated recognition memory test—support the use of this self-administered assessment to identify individuals with “suspected MCI” or “suspected dementia.” In this study, we identified between 71 and 622 persons with suspected dementia and between 128 and 1653 persons with suspected mild cognitive impairment (depending on specific criteria) over the course of 22 months. Assessment tools that can inexpensively and easily identify individuals with higher than average risk for cognitive impairment can facilitate recruitment for large-scale clinical trials for dementia treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Factors for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI))
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