Special Issue "Printed and Flexible Sensors"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Massood Atashbar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Western Michigan University, 1903 W Michigan Ave, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5329, USA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With advancements in the field of printed electronics, there has been a growing interest in the use of printing processes, such as screen, gravure, flexo and inkjet, for the development of sensors on flexible platforms, including plastic, paper and textiles. Printing is an additive manufacturing process that has expanded into the electronic industry, where electronic materials are deposited selectively using electrically functional inks. This has resulted in a paradigm shift to cost efficiently manufacture flexible electronic devices. Further the use of printed sensors, for the manufacture of flexible hybrid electronic systems can overcome the mechanical limitations of conventional electronics fabricated on rigid platforms and can provide solutions for conformal surfaces. The applications for the printed sensors range from monitoring human physiological parameters to asset monitoring in the aerospace, automotive, defense and biomedical engineering industries.

This Special Issue is devoted to recent and original research articles focused on printed sensors fabricated on flexible platforms. The aim of this Special Issue is to discuss various types of printed sensors, based on different configurations and materials, through articles that cover the design, fabrication, testing and application of the novel sensors.

Prof. Massood Atashbar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Chemical sensors
  • Physical sensors
  • Biochemical sensors
  • Wearable sensors
  • Disposable sensors

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Textile-Based Potentiometric Electrochemical pH Sensor for Wearable Applications
Biosensors 2019, 9(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9010014 - 16 Jan 2019
Cited by 10
Abstract
In this work, we present a potentiometric pH sensor on textile substrate for wearable applications. The sensitive (thick film graphite composite) and reference electrodes (Ag/AgCl) are printed on cellulose-polyester blend cloth. An excellent adhesion between printed electrodes allow the textile-based sensor to be [...] Read more.
In this work, we present a potentiometric pH sensor on textile substrate for wearable applications. The sensitive (thick film graphite composite) and reference electrodes (Ag/AgCl) are printed on cellulose-polyester blend cloth. An excellent adhesion between printed electrodes allow the textile-based sensor to be washed with a reliable pH response. The developed textile-based pH sensor works on the basis of electrochemical reaction, as observed through the potentiometric, cyclic voltammetry (100 mV/s) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (10 mHz to 1 MHz) analysis. The electrochemical double layer formation and the ionic exchanges of the sensitive electrode-pH solution interaction are observed through the electrochemical impedance spectroscopic analysis. Potentiometric analysis reveals that the fabricated textile-based sensor exhibits a sensitivity (slope factor) of 4 mV/pH with a response time of 5 s in the pH range 6–9. The presented sensor shows stable response with a potential of 47 ± 2 mV for long time (2000 s) even after it was washed in tap water. These results indicate that the sensor can be used for wearable applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed and Flexible Sensors)
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Open AccessArticle
Phosphate Modified Screen Printed Electrodes by LIFT Treatment for Glucose Detection
Biosensors 2018, 8(4), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8040091 - 16 Oct 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
The design of new materials as active layers is important for electrochemical sensor and biosensor development. Among the techniques for the modification and functionalization of electrodes, the laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) has emerged as a powerful physisorption method for the deposition of [...] Read more.
The design of new materials as active layers is important for electrochemical sensor and biosensor development. Among the techniques for the modification and functionalization of electrodes, the laser induced forward transfer (LIFT) has emerged as a powerful physisorption method for the deposition of various materials (even labile materials like enzymes) that results in intimate and stable contact with target surface. In this work, Pt, Au, and glassy carbon screen printed electrodes (SPEs) treated by LIFT with phosphate buffer have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to reveal a flattening effect of all surfaces. The electrochemical characterization by cyclic voltammetry shows significant differences depending on the electrode material. The electroactivity of Au is reduced while that of glassy carbon and Pt is greatly enhanced. In particular, the electrochemical behavior of a phosphate LIFT treated Pt showed a marked enrichment of hydrogen adsorbed layer, suggesting an elevated electrocatalytic activity towards glucose oxidation. When Pt electrodes modified in this way were used as an effective glucose sensor, a 1–10 mM linear response and a 10 µM detection limit were obtained. A possible role of phosphate that was securely immobilized on a Pt surface, as evidenced by XPS analysis, enhancing the glucose electrooxidation is discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed and Flexible Sensors)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Electrochemical Detection and Characterization of Nanoparticles with Printed Devices
Biosensors 2019, 9(2), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9020047 - 28 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Innovative methods to achieve the user-friendly, quick, and highly sensitive detection of nanomaterials are urgently needed. Nanomaterials have increased importance in commercial products, and there are concerns about the potential risk that they entail for the environment. In addition, detection of nanomaterials can [...] Read more.
Innovative methods to achieve the user-friendly, quick, and highly sensitive detection of nanomaterials are urgently needed. Nanomaterials have increased importance in commercial products, and there are concerns about the potential risk that they entail for the environment. In addition, detection of nanomaterials can be a highly valuable tool in many applications, such as biosensing. Electrochemical methods using disposable, low-cost, printed electrodes provide excellent analytical performance for the detection of a wide set of nanomaterials. In this review, the foundations and latest advances of several electrochemical strategies for the detection of nanoparticles using cost-effective printed devices are introduced. These strategies will equip the experimentalist with an extensive toolbox for the detection of nanoparticles of different chemical nature and possible applications ranging from quality control to environmental analysis and biosensing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Printed and Flexible Sensors)
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