Special Issue "Neural Sensing and Interfacing Technology"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Hargsoon Yoon
Website
Guest Editor
Neural Engineering and Nano-Electronics Laboratory, Department of Engineering, Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, 700 Park Ave, Norfolk, VA 23504, USA
Interests: Over the years, we have observed tremendous growth in the research of measuring neural signals, understanding brain activity and the nervous system, and interfacing them with the outside world. We have already witnessed the impact of the rapidly advancing technologies on human life in widespread areas.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to provide a forum for discussion, in a broader context, of neural sensing and interfacing methods, important refinements, and new approaches addressing major challenges and methodological improvements. We are interested in papers including all aspects of contemporary research, including (1) materials, devices, and systems, (2) invasive and non-invasive applications, (3) experimental, analytical, and computational studies, (4) in vivo and in vitro experiments, and (5) neurochemical, organelle, cellular, tissue, and animal and human level investigations. Even though this Special Issue discusses a broad range of neural sensing and interface technologies, we will not consider papers that exclusively deal with neuro-modulation research, such as neuro-stimulation, functional electrical stimulation, deep brain stimulation, optogenetic stimulation, and prostheses.

The keywords include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

  • Principles: electrical, optical, magnetic, mechanical, thermal, electrochemical, biochemical, electromechanical
  • Technology and methodology: materials, nanotechnology, microfabrication, neural sensors, neural probes, optrodes, functional near infrared spectroscopy, sensor fabrication, neural interface, sensing system, signal processing, microelectrode array, MEMS, microfluidics, micro total analysis systems, lab-on a chip, brain computer/machine interface, analytical, computational
  • Target applications: invasive, non-invasive, central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, neural network, unit spike, multi-unit activities, local field potentials, neurotransmitters, neurochemicals, hemodynamic, organelle, cellular, tissue, animal, clinical, in vivo, in vitro, acute, chronic

Dr. Hargsoon Yoon
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Biofouling-Resistant Impedimetric Sensor for Array High-Resolution Extracellular Potassium Monitoring in the Brain
Biosensors 2016, 6(4), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6040053 - 13 Oct 2016
Cited by 8
Abstract
Extracellular potassium concentration, [K+]o, plays a fundamental role in the physiological functions of the brain. Studies investigating changes in [K+]o have predominantly relied upon glass capillary electrodes with K+-sensitive solution gradients for their measurements. [...] Read more.
Extracellular potassium concentration, [K+]o, plays a fundamental role in the physiological functions of the brain. Studies investigating changes in [K+]o have predominantly relied upon glass capillary electrodes with K+-sensitive solution gradients for their measurements. However, such electrodes are unsuitable for taking spatio-temporal measurements and are limited by the surface area of their tips. We illustrate seizures invoked chemically and in optogenetically modified mice using blue light exposure while impedimetrically measuring the response. A sharp decrease of 1–2 mM in [K+]o before each spike has shown new physiological events not witnessed previously when measuring extracellular potassium concentrations during seizures in mice. We propose a novel approach that uses multichannel monolayer coated gold microelectrodes for in vivo spatio-temporal measurements of [K+]o in a mouse brain as an improvement to the conventional glass capillary electrode. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neural Sensing and Interfacing Technology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Computational Assessment of Neural Probe and Brain Tissue Interface under Transient Motion
Biosensors 2016, 6(2), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios6020027 - 16 Jun 2016
Cited by 4
Abstract
The functional longevity of a neural probe is dependent upon its ability to minimize injury risk during the insertion and recording period in vivo, which could be related to motion-related strain between the probe and surrounding tissue. A series of finite element [...] Read more.
The functional longevity of a neural probe is dependent upon its ability to minimize injury risk during the insertion and recording period in vivo, which could be related to motion-related strain between the probe and surrounding tissue. A series of finite element analyses was conducted to study the extent of the strain induced within the brain in an area around a neural probe. This study focuses on the transient behavior of neural probe and brain tissue interface with a viscoelastic model. Different stages of the interface from initial insertion of neural probe to full bonding of the probe by astro-glial sheath formation are simulated utilizing analytical tools to investigate the effects of relative motion between the neural probe and the brain while friction coefficients and kinematic frequencies are varied. The analyses can provide an in-depth look at the quantitative benefits behind using soft materials for neural probes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neural Sensing and Interfacing Technology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
In Vivo Electrochemical Analysis of a PEDOT/MWCNT Neural Electrode Coating
Biosensors 2015, 5(4), 618-646; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios5040618 - 13 Oct 2015
Cited by 46
Abstract
Neural electrodes hold tremendous potential for improving understanding of brain function and restoring lost neurological functions. Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and dexamethasone (Dex)-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) coatings have shown promise to improve chronic neural electrode performance. Here, we employ electrochemical techniques to characterize the [...] Read more.
Neural electrodes hold tremendous potential for improving understanding of brain function and restoring lost neurological functions. Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and dexamethasone (Dex)-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) coatings have shown promise to improve chronic neural electrode performance. Here, we employ electrochemical techniques to characterize the coating in vivo. Coated and uncoated electrode arrays were implanted into rat visual cortex and subjected to daily cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for 11 days. Coated electrodes experienced a significant decrease in 1 kHz impedance within the first two days of implantation followed by an increase between days 4 and 7. Equivalent circuit analysis showed that the impedance increase is the result of surface capacitance reduction, likely due to protein and cellular processes encapsulating the porous coating. Coating’s charge storage capacity remained consistently higher than uncoated electrodes, demonstrating its in vivo electrochemical stability. To decouple the PEDOT/MWCNT material property changes from the tissue response, in vitro characterization was conducted by soaking the coated electrodes in PBS for 11 days. Some coated electrodes exhibited steady impedance while others exhibiting large increases associated with large decreases in charge storage capacity suggesting delamination in PBS. This was not observed in vivo, as scanning electron microscopy of explants verified the integrity of the coating with no sign of delamination or cracking. Despite the impedance increase, coated electrodes successfully recorded neural activity throughout the implantation period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neural Sensing and Interfacing Technology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop