Microneedle Diagnostics

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors and Healthcare".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 11219

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK
Interests: topical and transdermal drug delivery; microneedle technology; biosensors
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK
Interests: drug delivery; pharmaceutical formulation; transdermal administration; microneedles; photodynamic therapy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microneedles are microdevices designed to penetrate biological membranes such as the skin and the cornea. They are an emerging technology with applications in drug delivery and medical diagnostics. Various microneedle diagnostic devices have been developed for blood glucose monitoring and the detection of other medical conditions, such as skin cancer and infections. Such devices boast the ability to sample or analyse interstitial fluids or capillary blood in a minimally invasive manner. As such, they have been considered potential replacements for invasive diagnostic procedures. With the renewed interest in efficient diagnostic technologies instigated by recent events, including the coronavirus pandemic, it is timely to now examine the state of the art and the future directions of microneedle diagnostics. In this special issue, we welcome contributions of reviews and original articles offering insights on the latest challenges and advances in microneedle diagnostic technology. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Method development (e.g. device design, microfabrication, analytical techniques)
  • System integration (e.g. lab-on-a-chip, wearables, mobile technologies)
  • Clinical applications (e.g. disease diagnosis, therapeutic drug monitoring)

Prof. Dr. Ryan Donnelly
Dr. Keng Ng
Guest Editors

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 3619 KiB  
Article
Direct Capture and Early Detection of Lyme Disease Spirochete in Skin with a Microneedle Patch
by Emily Kight, Rosana Alfaro, Shiva Kumar Goud Gadila, Shuang Chang, David Evans, Monica Embers and Frederick Haselton
Biosensors 2022, 12(10), 819; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12100819 - 2 Oct 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 5070
Abstract
Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato family of spirochetes causes Lyme disease (LD) in animals and humans. As geographic territory of ticks expands across the globe, surveillance measures are needed to measure transmission rates and provide early risk testing of suspected bites. The current standard [...] Read more.
Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato family of spirochetes causes Lyme disease (LD) in animals and humans. As geographic territory of ticks expands across the globe, surveillance measures are needed to measure transmission rates and provide early risk testing of suspected bites. The current standard testing of LD uses an indirect two-step serological assay that detects host immune reactivity. Early detection remains a challenge because the host antibody response develops several weeks after infection. A microneedle (MN) device was developed to sample interstitial fluid (ISF) and capture spirochetes directly from skin. After sampling, the MN patch is easily dissolved in water or TE buffer, and the presence of spirochete DNA is detected by PCR. Performance was tested by spiking porcine ear skin with inactivated Borrelia burgdorferi, which had an approximate recovery of 80% of spirochetes. With further development, this simple direct PCR method could be a transformative approach for early detection of the causative agent of Lyme disease and enable rapid treatment to patients when infection is early, and numbers of systemic spirochetes are low. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microneedle Diagnostics)
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Review

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18 pages, 2179 KiB  
Review
Microneedle-Based Glucose Sensor Platform: From Vitro to Wearable Point-of-Care Testing Systems
by Jian Ju, Lin Li, Sagar Regmi, Xinyu Zhang and Shixing Tang
Biosensors 2022, 12(8), 606; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios12080606 - 6 Aug 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 4936
Abstract
Significant advanced have recently been made in exploiting microneedle-based (MN-based) diabetes devices for minimally invasive wearable biosensors and for continuous glucose monitoring. Within this emerging class of skin-worn MN-based sensors, the ISF can be utilized as a rich biomarker source to diagnose diabetes. [...] Read more.
Significant advanced have recently been made in exploiting microneedle-based (MN-based) diabetes devices for minimally invasive wearable biosensors and for continuous glucose monitoring. Within this emerging class of skin-worn MN-based sensors, the ISF can be utilized as a rich biomarker source to diagnose diabetes. While initial work of MN devices focused on ISF extraction, the recent research trend has been oriented toward developing in vivo glucose sensors coupled with optical or electrochemical (EC) instrumentation. This outlook highlights the essential characteristics of the sensing mechanisms, rational design, sensing properties, and applications. Finally, we describe the opinions about the challenge and prospects of optical and EC MN-based device platforms for the fabrication of wearable biosensors and their application potential in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microneedle Diagnostics)
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