Special Issue "Wearable Biosensors 2019"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 January 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Amay J. Bandodkar
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
Center for Bio-Integrated Electronics at the Simpson Querrey Institute for BioNanotechnology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
Interests: wearable electronics; chemical sensors; implantable sensors; biofuel cells; batteries, printed electronics; surface functionalization; electrochemistry
Dr. Jonathan T. Reeder
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
Center for Bio-Integrated Electronics at the Simpson Querrey Institute for BioNanotechnology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA
Interests: wearable electronics; shape-programmable soft materials; implantable sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wearable biosensors offer unprecedented avenues in the fields of diagnostics, health management, and sports science. Unlike conventional biosensors, these devices are physically attached to the target tissue (skin, cornea, enamel, etc.) and enable continuous, unobtrusive monitoring of the wearer’s physiology. However, the bio-integration of devices represents a unique set of challenges to material scientists, bioengineers, and mechanical and electrical engineers. Human tissue is soft, stretchable, and curvilinear while conventional devices are rigid and planar. The mis-match between the mechanical properties of these results in poor device integration, tissue irritation and low signal to noise ratio. Recent advances in materials, mechanics and integration schemes have led to the emergence of new classes of soft, flexible, and even stretchable wearable biosensors. Such devices enable direct monitoring of important physiological parameters, such as biopotentials, body motion, pressure, blood flow, temperature and biochemicals in a non-invasive fashion. This Biosensors Special Issue “Wearable Biosensors” is dedicated to reporting advances towards addressing present grand challenges and the future scope of the field of wearable biosensors. Topics include, but are not restricted to:

  • Wearable systems for health monitoring and intervention
  • Wearable environmental sensors
  • Novel materials for wearable sensors and power sources.
  • Manufacturing methods for fabricating wearable, flexible or stretchable sensors and power sources
  • Characterization and improvements to the skin/device interface (device mechanics, adhesive strategies, etc.)
  • New biochemical and biophysical sensing principles
  • New targets for wearable sensing
  • Energy harvesting and storage for wearable sensors
  • Signal processing and wireless transmission schemes for wearable sensors.
  • Systems engineering and integration for wearable sensors.

Research papers, short communications, perspective article and reviews are all welcome. Prior discussion with the Guest Editors would be helpful if the author(s) have interest in submitting a review/perspective article.

Dr. Amay J. Bandodkar
Dr. Jonathan T. Reeder
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bioelectronics 
  • Wearable electronics 
  • Stretchable sensors
  • Flexible electronics 
  • Electrochemical sensors 
  • Optical sensors
  • Wireless sensors 
  • Wearable batteries 
  • Wearable energy harvesting

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Enzymatic Low Volume Passive Sweat Based Assays for Multi-Biomarker Detection
Biosensors 2019, 9(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9010013 - 16 Jan 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Simultaneous detection of correlated multi-biomarkers on a single low-cost platform in ultra-low fluid volumes with robustness is in growing demand for the development of wearable diagnostics. A non-faradaic biosensor for the simultaneous detection of alcohol, glucose, and lactate utilizing low volumes (1–5 μL) [...] Read more.
Simultaneous detection of correlated multi-biomarkers on a single low-cost platform in ultra-low fluid volumes with robustness is in growing demand for the development of wearable diagnostics. A non-faradaic biosensor for the simultaneous detection of alcohol, glucose, and lactate utilizing low volumes (1–5 μL) of sweat is demonstrated. Biosensing is implemented using nanotextured ZnO films integrated on a flexible porous membrane to achieve enhanced sensor performance. The ZnO sensing region is functionalized with enzymes specific for the detection of alcohol, glucose, and lactate in the ranges encompassing their physiologically relevant levels. A non-faradaic chronoamperometry technique is used to measure the current changes associated with interactions of the target biomarkers with their specific enzyme. The specificity performance of the biosensing platform was established in the presence of cortisol as the non-specific molecule. Biosensing performance of the platform in a continuous mode performed over a 1.5-h duration showed a stable current response to cumulative lifestyle biomarker concentrations with capability to distinguish reliably between low, mid, and high concentration ranges of alcohol (0.1, 25, 100 mg/dL), glucose (0.1, 10, 50 mg/dL), and lactate (1, 50, 100 mM). The low detection limits and a broader dynamic range for the lifestyle biomarker detection are quantified in this research demonstrating its suitability for translation into a wearable device. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable Biosensors 2019)
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Open AccessArticle
Breathable Dry Silver/Silver Chloride Electronic Textile Electrodes for Electrodermal Activity Monitoring
Biosensors 2018, 8(3), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios8030079 - 24 Aug 2018
Cited by 5
Abstract
The focus of this study is to design and integrate silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electronic textile (e-textile) electrodes into different textile substrates to evaluate their ability to monitor electrodermal activity (EDA). Ag/AgCl e-textiles were stitched into woven textiles of cotton, nylon, and polyester to [...] Read more.
The focus of this study is to design and integrate silver/silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) electronic textile (e-textile) electrodes into different textile substrates to evaluate their ability to monitor electrodermal activity (EDA). Ag/AgCl e-textiles were stitched into woven textiles of cotton, nylon, and polyester to function as EDA monitoring electrodes. EDA stimulus responses detected by dry e-textile electrodes at various locations on the hand were compared to the EDA signals collected by dry solid Ag/AgCl electrodes. 4-h EDA data with e-textile and clinically conventional rigid electrodes were compared in relation to skin surface temperature. The woven cotton textile substrate with e-textile electrodes (0.12 cm2 surface area, 0.40 cm distance) was the optimal material to detect the EDA stimulus responses with the highest average Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.913 ± 0.041 when placed on the distal phalanx of the middle finger. In addition, differences with EDA waveforms recorded on various fingers were observed. Trends of long-term measurements showed that skin surface temperature affected EDA signals recorded by non-breathable electrodes more than when e-textile electrodes were used. The effective design criteria outlined for e-textile electrodes can promote the development of comfortable and unobtrusive EDA monitoring systems, which can help improve our knowledge of the human neurological system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable Biosensors 2019)
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