Special Issue "Design and Evaluation of Sensors in Type 1 Diabetes"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors and Healthcare".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Peter G. Jacobs
Website
Guest Editor
Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, USA
Interests: glucose sensors; type 1 diabetes; closed loop control; decision support; signal processing; machine learning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to announce a new Special Issue in Biosensors called “Design and Evaluation of Sensors in Type 1 Diabetes”. Care for people with type 1 diabetes has been transformed by the introduction of small, accurate continuous glucose sensors. Use of glucose sensing technology has been shown to reduce HbA1c and improve glycemic outcomes in people with type 1 diabetes. Integrating continuous glucose sensors into closed loop drug delivery systems has enabled automated insulin delivery, which improves quality of life and also has greatly improved glycemic outcomes in people with type 1 diabetes. Challenges remain in the the design of next-generation sensors for people with type 1 diabetes, including effective handling of problems that can confound glucose control, such as variations in meals, exercise, medication, stress, and sleep. Longer-term sensors are now becoming available for use, but problems must be overcome in these designs, including appropriately handling the body’s response to foreign materials, breakage from long-term use, and changes in blood flow to the tissue where the sensor is inserted. Noninvasive sensors may also become available if issues with accuracy can be overcome. Further, sensors may also be helpful beyond glucose sensing, including sensors that measure physical activity, food intake, insulin, glucagon, and others. In this Special Issue, we invite researchers to contribute manuscripts that describe the next generation of sensor design and also the challenges presented to current sensors in the field of type 1 diabetes.   

Dr. Peter G. Jacobs
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Glucose sensor
  • Type 1 diabetes
  • Continuous glucose monitor
  • Insulin
  • Physical activity
  • Sleep
  • Glucagon
  • Noninvasive sensor

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Accuracy of the Dexcom G6 Glucose Sensor during Aerobic, Resistance, and Interval Exercise in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes
Biosensors 2020, 10(10), 138; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios10100138 - 29 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 886
Abstract
The accuracy of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors may be significantly impacted by exercise. We evaluated the impact of three different types of exercise on the accuracy of the Dexcom G6 sensor. Twenty-four adults with type 1 diabetes on multiple daily injections wore [...] Read more.
The accuracy of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors may be significantly impacted by exercise. We evaluated the impact of three different types of exercise on the accuracy of the Dexcom G6 sensor. Twenty-four adults with type 1 diabetes on multiple daily injections wore a G6 sensor. Participants were randomized to aerobic, resistance, or high intensity interval training (HIIT) exercise. Each participant completed two in-clinic 30-min exercise sessions. The sensors were applied on average 5.3 days prior to the in-clinic visits (range 0.6–9.9). Capillary blood glucose (CBG) measurements with a Contour Next meter were performed before and after exercise as well as every 10 min during exercise. No CGM calibrations were performed. The median absolute relative difference (MARD) and median relative difference (MRD) of the CGM as compared with the reference CBG did not differ significantly from the start of exercise to the end exercise across all exercise types (ranges for aerobic MARD: 8.9 to 13.9% and MRD: −6.4 to 0.5%, resistance MARD: 7.7 to 14.5% and MRD: −8.3 to −2.9%, HIIT MARD: 12.1 to 16.8% and MRD: −14.3 to −9.1%). The accuracy of the no-calibration Dexcom G6 CGM was not significantly impacted by aerobic, resistance, or HIIT exercise. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Design and Evaluation of Sensors in Type 1 Diabetes)
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