Special Issue "TRP Channels in Cancer Pathophysiology and Therapy"

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Francesco De Logu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
Interests: ion channels
Prof. Massi Daniela
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
Interests: Melanoma
Dr. Romina Nassini
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy
Interests: cell biology; inflammation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The progression of cancer is known to be associated with changes that upset the balance of the cell cycle, affecting the suppression of cell death pathways, the increase of cell proliferation, the dysregulation of cell differentiation, and the reduction of interactions between cells and the stromatic tissue. Many of these changes are usually associated with alterations in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations that promote signaling cascades and modify apoptotic, cytoplasmic, mitochondrial, and endoplasmic reticulum mechanisms. In this respect, membrane ion channels are a main source of Ca2+ for the cell, are highly sensitive to variations in the chemical-physical state of the microenvironment, and are activated by a huge number of exogenous and endogenous molecules. Among the membrane channels, an important role is played by Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels. TRP channels are a group of unique ion channels that serve as cellular sensors for a broad spectrum of physical and chemical stimuli. They respond in a very subtle way to the classic elements of cell signaling such as PIP2, Ca2+, cyclic nucleotides, phosphorylation potential, osmotic temperature and pressure, as well as to environmental inputs that can be beneficial or harmful and, above all, are significantly reactive to the red-ox state of a cell. In primary sensory neurons, the activation of TRP channels determines the development of an action potential, and therefore a signal, that reaches the central nervous system, whereas in non-neuronal cells, it can promote oxidative stress, alter enzymatic activities, modify the membrane potential, and modulate endocytosis and exocytosis. In this way, TRP channels are known to play crucial roles in many fundamental processes of life such as fertilization, sensory transduction, cell survival, and development.

It is a great pleasure to invite you and your teams, as experts from different backgrounds (medicine, immunology, clinics, genetics, molecular biology, and epidemiology), as well as those who work in the field of cancer and TRP channels to contribute original or review research articles to this Special Issue. We are particularly interested in articles that try to evaluate a possible link between TRP channels and cancer from a pathological point of view and in the induction of pain.

Dr. Francesco De Logu
Prof. Massi Daniela
Dr. Romina Nassini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomolecules is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • TRP
  • cancer
  • oxidative stress
  • pain

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review
Endolysosomal TRPMLs in Cancer
Biomolecules 2021, 11(1), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom11010065 - 06 Jan 2021
Viewed by 767
Abstract
Lysosomes, the degradative endpoints and sophisticated cellular signaling hubs, are emerging as intracellular Ca2+ stores that govern multiple cellular processes. Dys-homeostasis of lysosomal Ca2+ is intimately associated with a variety of human diseases including cancer. Recent studies have suggested that the [...] Read more.
Lysosomes, the degradative endpoints and sophisticated cellular signaling hubs, are emerging as intracellular Ca2+ stores that govern multiple cellular processes. Dys-homeostasis of lysosomal Ca2+ is intimately associated with a variety of human diseases including cancer. Recent studies have suggested that the Ca2+-permeable channels Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Mucolipins (TRPMLs, TRPML1-3) integrate multiple processes of cell growth, division and metabolism. Dysregulation of TRPMLs activity has been implicated in cancer development. In this review, we provide a summary of the latest development of TRPMLs in cancer. The expression of TRPMLs in cancer, TRPMLs in cancer cell nutrient sensing, TRPMLs-mediated lysosomal exocytosis in cancer development, TRPMLs in TFEB-mediated gene transcription of cancer cells, TRPMLs in bacteria-related cancer development and TRPMLs-regulated antitumor immunity are discussed. We hope to guide readers toward a more in-depth discussion of the importance of lysosomal TRPMLs in cancer progression and other human diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue TRP Channels in Cancer Pathophysiology and Therapy)
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Brief Report
TRPA1 Expression in Synovial Sarcoma May Support Neural Origin
Biomolecules 2020, 10(10), 1446; https://doi.org/10.3390/biom10101446 - 15 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 672
Abstract
Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant mesenchymal soft tissue neoplasm. Despite its name, the cells of origin are not synovial cells, but rather neural, myogenic, or multipotent mesenchymal stem cells have been proposed as possible cells originators. Unlike other sarcomas, an unusual presentation [...] Read more.
Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant mesenchymal soft tissue neoplasm. Despite its name, the cells of origin are not synovial cells, but rather neural, myogenic, or multipotent mesenchymal stem cells have been proposed as possible cells originators. Unlike other sarcomas, an unusual presentation of long-term pain at the tumor site has been documented, but the exact mechanisms have not been fully clarified yet. The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is a nonselective cation channel mainly expressed in primary sensory neurons, where it functions as a pain sensor. TRPA1 have also been described in multiple non-excitable cells, including those derived from neural crest stem cells such as glial cells and, in particular, Schwann cell oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. We evaluated TRPA1 expression in SS. We selected a cohort of 41 SSs, and by immunohistochemistry, we studied TRPA1 expression. TRPA1 was found in 92.6% of cases. Triple TRPA1/pS100/SOX10 and TRPA1/SLUG/SNAIL staining strongly supports a neural origin of SS. TRPA1 positivity was also observed in a subset of cases negative with pS100, SOX10 and/or SLUG/SNAIL, and these divergent phenotypes may reflect a process of tumor plasticity and dedifferentiation of neural-derived SSs. Given the functional diversity of TRPA1 and its expression in neuronal and non-neuronal multipotent neural crest stem cells, it remains to be determined whether TRPA1 expression in SSs neoplastic cells plays a role in the molecular mechanism associated with premonitory pain symptoms and tumor progression. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue TRP Channels in Cancer Pathophysiology and Therapy)
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