Special Issue "Miniaturized Biosensors and Wearable Devices"

A special issue of Biology (ISSN 2079-7737). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 2338

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Babak Shadgan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada
Interests: biosensor; implantable; biophotonics
Dr. Amir Manbachi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA
Interests: biosensor; implantable; ultrasound

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“Miniaturized Biosensors and Wearable Devices” is a Special Issue of Biology for presentation, discussion, and exchange of state-of-the-art information related to the latest research and development of miniaturized, wearable, and implantable biosensors applied in health care monitoring and diagnostics, as well as human body movement detection and tracking. These new niches of biomedical engineering, science, and technology have already demonstrated a significant impact on healthcare and active lifestyle. Accordingly, the main objective of this Special Issue of Biology is to provide a unique opportunity for engineers, scientists, clinicians, researchers, manufacturers, and knowledge translators to share and discuss science, developments, and novel applications of miniaturized biosensors and wearable technologies in health, activity, and disease.

We look forward to receiving your submissions!

Dr. Babak Shadgan
Dr. Amir Manbachi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biosensor
  • implantable
  • wearable
  • remote monitoring
  • miniaturized sensor
  • tissue monitoring

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
The Effects of Silicone Enclosure Colour on the Function of Optical Sensors
Biology 2022, 11(6), 932; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology11060932 - 19 Jun 2022
Viewed by 376
Abstract
The colour of the silicone enclosure of an implantable reflectance-based optical probe plays a critical role in sensor performance. Red-coloured probes that are highly reflective to near-infrared light have been found to increase photodetector power by a factor of 6 for wavelengths between [...] Read more.
The colour of the silicone enclosure of an implantable reflectance-based optical probe plays a critical role in sensor performance. Red-coloured probes that are highly reflective to near-infrared light have been found to increase photodetector power by a factor of 6 for wavelengths between 660 and 950 nm and triple the magnitude of measured cardiac pulsations compared to traditional black probes. The increase in photodetector power and cardiac pulsation magnitude is presumably due to increased spatial range resulting from a higher magnitude of superficial tissue scattering. Conversely, probes with highly absorbent colours such as black and blue result in more stable signals and are expected to have higher spatial resolution and depth of penetration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Miniaturized Biosensors and Wearable Devices)
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Article
Application of Wearable Sensors Technology for Lumbar Spine Kinematic Measurements during Daily Activities following Microdiscectomy Due to Severe Sciatica
Biology 2022, 11(3), 398; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology11030398 - 03 Mar 2022
Viewed by 591
Abstract
Background: The recurrence rate of lumbar spine microdiscectomies (rLSMs) is estimated to be 5–15%. Lumbar spine flexion (LSF) of more than 10° is mentioned as the most harmful load to the intervertebral disc that could lead to recurrence during the first six postoperative [...] Read more.
Background: The recurrence rate of lumbar spine microdiscectomies (rLSMs) is estimated to be 5–15%. Lumbar spine flexion (LSF) of more than 10° is mentioned as the most harmful load to the intervertebral disc that could lead to recurrence during the first six postoperative weeks. The purpose of this study is to quantify LSFs, following LSM, at the period of six weeks postoperatively. Methods: LSFs were recorded during the daily activities of 69 subjects for 24 h twice per week, using Inertial Measurement Units (IMU). Results: The mean number of more than 10 degrees of LSFs per hour were: 41.3/h during the 1st postoperative week (P.W.) (29.9% healthy subjects-H.S.), 2nd P.W. 60.1/h (43.5% H.S.), 3rd P.W. 74.2/h (53.7% H.S.), 4th P.W. 82.9/h (60% H.S.), 5th P.W. 97.3/h (70.4% H.S.) and 6th P.W. 105.5/h (76.4% H.S.). Conclusions: LSFs constitute important risk factors for rLDH. Our study records the lumbar spine kinematic pattern of such patients for the first time during their daily activities. Patients’ data report less sagittal plane movements than healthy subjects. In vitro studies should be carried out, replicating our results to identify if such a kinematic pattern could cause rLDH. Furthermore, IMU biofeedback capabilities could protect patients from such harmful movements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Miniaturized Biosensors and Wearable Devices)
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Article
Studying the Accuracy and Function of Different Thermometry Techniques for Measuring Body Temperature
Biology 2021, 10(12), 1327; https://doi.org/10.3390/biology10121327 - 15 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 944
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine which thermometry technique is the most accurate for regular measurement of body temperature. We compared seven different commercially available thermometers with a gold standard medical-grade thermometer (Welch-Allyn): four digital infrared thermometers (Wellworks, Braun, Withings, MOBI), [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to determine which thermometry technique is the most accurate for regular measurement of body temperature. We compared seven different commercially available thermometers with a gold standard medical-grade thermometer (Welch-Allyn): four digital infrared thermometers (Wellworks, Braun, Withings, MOBI), one digital sublingual thermometer (Braun), one zero heat flux thermometer (3M), and one infrared thermal imaging camera (FLIR One). Thirty young healthy adults participated in an experiment that altered core body temperature. After baseline measurements, participants placed their feet in a cold-water bath while consuming cold water for 30 min. Subsequently, feet were removed and covered with a blanket for 30 min. Throughout the session, temperature was recorded every 10 min with all devices. The Braun tympanic thermometer (left ear) had the best agreement with the gold standard (mean error: 0.044 °C). The FLIR One thermal imaging camera was the least accurate device (mean error: −0.522 °C). A sign test demonstrated that all thermometry devices were significantly different than the gold standard except for the Braun tympanic thermometer (left ear). Our study showed that not all temperature monitoring techniques are equal, and suggested that tympanic thermometers are the most accurate commercially available system for the regular measurement of body temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Miniaturized Biosensors and Wearable Devices)
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