Special Issue "Engineering Bone-Implant Materials"

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Mohammad Elahinia

Dynamic and Smart Systems Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, The University of Toledo, OH 43606, USA
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Interests: additive manufacturing; 3D printing; shape memory alloys; materials engineering; finite element analysis; control systems engineering; product design and development; electrical engineering; design engineering; product development; manufacturing process mechanics; mechanical processes; machining; experimental analysis of behavior; design optimization; MR fluids; mechanical vibrations; medical devices; computer-aided engineering
Guest Editor
Dr. Hamdy Ibrahim

Dynamic and Smart Systems Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, 43606, USA
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Guest Editor
Dr. Mohammad Javad Mahtabi

Dynamic and Smart Systems Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, 43606, USA
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Guest Editor
Dr. Reza Mehrabi

Dynamic and Smart Systems Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH, 43606, USA
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue on “Engineering Bone-Implant Materials” is concerned with the engineering aspects of the materials that are used for bone implants. Development of new materials that are designed to mimic or replace the bone, their biocompatibility, mechanical behavior, damage evolution and failure modeling and prediction under applied forces and deformations. Computational, analytical, and experimental studies investigating the underlying mechanisms and the different behavior of the bone implant materials and their effect on improving the implantation process are also included in the scope.

Examples of relevant subjects include:

  • Stress-strain-time responses of bone-implant materials
  • Fatigue and Fracture mechanics of bone-implant materials
  • Tribological properties of bone-implant materials and their replacements
  • The behavior of the bone-implants under impact loading
  • New methodologies for in lab and in practice measurement of mechanical properties of bone-implant materials
  • Computer simulations of the material behavior and implant-organ interaction
  • Case studies on the clinical performance of the implanted parts

Prof. Dr. Mohammad Elahinia
Dr. Hamdy Ibrahim
Dr. Mohammad Javad Mahtabi
Dr. Reza Mehrabi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Bioengineering is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle A Study of the Biomechanical Behavior of the Implantation Method of Inverted Shoulder Prosthesis (BIO–RSA) under Different Abduction Movements
Bioengineering 2019, 6(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering6010019
Received: 19 December 2018 / Revised: 2 February 2019 / Accepted: 6 February 2019 / Published: 19 February 2019
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Abstract
The shoulder is the most mobile joint of the human body, but it is very fragile; several pathologies, and especially muscular degenerations in the elderly, can affect its stability. These are more commonly called rotator cuff fractures. In the case of this type [...] Read more.
The shoulder is the most mobile joint of the human body, but it is very fragile; several pathologies, and especially muscular degenerations in the elderly, can affect its stability. These are more commonly called rotator cuff fractures. In the case of this type of pathology, the mobility of the shoulder decreases and pain appears. In order to restore mobility and reduce pain, implantation of an inverted shoulder prosthesis is recommended. Unfortunately, over time a notch phenomenon has been observed. In the lower position of the arm, part of the implant comes into contact with the scapula and therefore causes deterioration of the bone. Among the solutions adopted is the lateralized method with bone grafting. However, a main disadvantage of this method concerns the reconstruction of the graft in the case of prosthesis revision. In this context, the aim of the present work was to reconstruct the shoulder joint in 3D in order to obtain a bio-faithful geometry, and then study the behavior of different types of biomaterials that can replace bone grafting. To this end, three arm abduction motions were examined for three individuals. From the results obtained, it appears that grafts in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) exhibit a behavior closer to that of bones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Engineering Bone-Implant Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Predicting the Biodegradation of Magnesium Alloy Implants: Modeling, Parameter Identification, and Validation
Bioengineering 2018, 5(4), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering5040105
Received: 30 September 2018 / Revised: 19 November 2018 / Accepted: 20 November 2018 / Published: 29 November 2018
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Abstract
Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys can degrade gradually up to complete dissolution in the physiological environment. This property makes these biomaterials appealing for different biomedical applications, such as bone implants. In order to qualify Mg and its alloys for bone implant applications, there [...] Read more.
Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys can degrade gradually up to complete dissolution in the physiological environment. This property makes these biomaterials appealing for different biomedical applications, such as bone implants. In order to qualify Mg and its alloys for bone implant applications, there is a need to precisely model their degradation (corrosion) behavior in the physiological environment. Therefore, the primary objective develop a model that can be used to predict the corrosion behavior of Mg-based alloys in vitro, while capturing the effect of pitting corrosion. To this end, a customized FORTRAN user material subroutine (or VUMAT) that is compatible with the finite element (FE) solver Abaqus/Explicit (Dassault Systèmes, Waltham, MA, USA) was developed. Using the developed subroutine, a continuum damage mechanism (CDM) FE model was developed to phenomenologically estimate the corrosion rate of a biocompatible Mg–Zn–Ca alloy. In addition, the mass loss immersion test was conducted to measure mass loss over time by submerging Mg–Zn–Ca coupons in a glass reactor filled with simulated body fluid (SBF) solution at pH 7.4 and 37 °C. Then, response surface methodology (RSM) was applied to calibrate the corrosion FE model parameters (i.e., Gamma (γ), Psi (ψ), Beta (β), and kinetic parameter (Ku)). The optimum values for γ, ψ, β and Ku were found to be 2.74898, 2.60477, 5.1, and 0.1005, respectively. Finally, given the good fit between FE predictions and experimental data, it was concluded that the numerical framework precisely captures the effect of corrosion on the mass loss over time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Engineering Bone-Implant Materials)
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Open AccessArticle Medial Collateral Ligament Deficiency of the Elbow Joint: A Computational Approach
Bioengineering 2018, 5(4), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering5040084
Received: 4 August 2018 / Revised: 2 October 2018 / Accepted: 8 October 2018 / Published: 10 October 2018
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Abstract
Computational elbow joint models, capable of simulating medial collateral ligament deficiency, can be extremely valuable tools for surgical planning and refinement of therapeutic strategies. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of varying levels of medial collateral ligament deficiency on [...] Read more.
Computational elbow joint models, capable of simulating medial collateral ligament deficiency, can be extremely valuable tools for surgical planning and refinement of therapeutic strategies. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of varying levels of medial collateral ligament deficiency on elbow joint stability using subject-specific computational models. Two elbow joint models were placed at the pronated forearm position and passively flexed by applying a vertical downward motion on humeral head. The models included three-dimensional bone geometries, multiple ligament bundles wrapped around the joint, and the discretized cartilage representation. Four different ligament conditions were simulated: All intact ligaments, isolated medial collateral ligament (MCL) anterior bundle deficiency, isolated MCL posterior bundle deficiency, and complete MCL deficiency. Minimal kinematic differences were observed for isolated anterior and posterior bundle deficient elbows. However, sectioning the entire MCL resulted in significant kinematic differences and induced substantial elbow instability. Joint contact areas were nearly similar for the intact and isolated posterior bundle deficiency. Minor differences were observed for the isolated anterior bundle deficiency, and major differences were observed for the entire MCL deficiency. Complete elbow dislocations were not observed for any ligament deficiency level. As expected, during isolated anterior bundle deficiency, the remaining posterior bundle experiences higher load and vice versa. Overall, the results indicate that either MCL anterior or posterior bundle can provide anterior elbow stability, but the anterior bundle has a somewhat bigger influence on joint kinematics and contact characteristics than posterior one. A study with a larger sample size could help to strengthen the conclusion and statistical significant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Engineering Bone-Implant Materials)
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