Bioengineering on Study and Development of Innovative Antimicrobial Concepts

A special issue of Bioengineering (ISSN 2306-5354). This special issue belongs to the section "Biochemical Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (16 October 2023) | Viewed by 13228

Special Issue Editors

Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Mattenstrasse24a, BPR-1096, 4058 Basel, Switzerland
Interests: biomaterials; biophysics; bionanotechnology; biointeraction; BioAFM

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Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, Daxue Rd., East Dist., Tainan 70101, Taiwan
Interests: functional ceramic coating; high-entropy ceramics; biomaterials; photocatalysis; mechanical properties
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Guest Editor
School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China
Interests: functional ceramic coating; high-entropy ceramics; biomaterials; photocatalysis; mechanical properties

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) bacteria are globally causing a substantial amount of death and a huge cost to public healthcare systems every year. Hence, insightful studies considering innovative antimicrobial concepts are important to discover the interaction mechanism between bacteria and materials, leading to new concepts for developing innovative antimicrobial materials. The mechanisms found regarding bacteria–bacteria interaction and bacteria–material interaction are helpful in designing new concepts to impede bacterial colonization on material surfaces, e.g., implant surfaces, tissue surfaces, and even the surface of mammalian cells. Such in-depth studies can be achieved through studies in the framework of bioengineering, biophysics, molecular biology, systematic biology, simulation, material science et al. The obtained knowledge can guide the design of new materials to prevent bacterial colonization or effectively kill bacteria, which can be moreover applied in broad fields, e.g., implant design, water purification, biosensor development, and food packaging.

This Special Issue "Bioengineering on Study and Development of Innovative Antimicrobial Concepts" will promote original research studies and comprehensive reviews that focus on, but are not limited to: bacterial interaction regarding bacterial colonization/infection and new concept design of preventing bacterial colonization/infection bacterial sensing. 

Dr. Fei Pan
Prof. Dr. Yen-Hsun Su
Prof. Dr. Fangwei Guo
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • interaction
  • mechanism
  • antimicrobial
  • materials

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

20 pages, 5214 KiB  
Article
Green Synthesis of Magnesium Oxide Nanoparticles by Using Abrus precatorius Bark Extract and Their Photocatalytic, Antioxidant, Antibacterial, and Cytotoxicity Activities
by Saheb Ali, Kattakgoundar Govindaraj Sudha, Natesan Thirumalaivasan, Maqusood Ahamed, Saravanan Pandiaraj, Vijayarangan Devi Rajeswari, Yamini Vinayagam, Muthu Thiruvengadam and Rajakumar Govindasamy
Bioengineering 2023, 10(3), 302; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10030302 - 27 Feb 2023
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 4580
Abstract
The current research is concerned with the synthesis of magnesium oxide (MgO) nanoparticles (NPs) from Abrus precatorius L. bark extract via the green chemistry method. The synthesized MgO NPs was confirmed by using several characterization methods like XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM, and UV-visible [...] Read more.
The current research is concerned with the synthesis of magnesium oxide (MgO) nanoparticles (NPs) from Abrus precatorius L. bark extract via the green chemistry method. The synthesized MgO NPs was confirmed by using several characterization methods like XRD, FTIR, SEM, TEM, and UV-visible analysis. The synthesized MgO NPs displayed a small particle size along with a specific surface area. Abrus precatorius bark synthesized MgO NPs with a higher ratio of dye degradation, and antioxidant activity showed a higher percentage of free radical scavenging in synthesized MgO NPs. Zebrafish embryos were used as a model organism to assess the toxicity of the obtained MgO nanoparticles, and the results concluded that the MgO NPs were nontoxic. In addition, the anticancer properties of MgO nanoparticles were analyzed by using a human melanoma cancer cell line (A375) via MTT, XTT, NRU, and LDH assessment. MgO NPs treated a human melanoma cancer cell line and resulted in apoptosis and necrosis based on the concentration, which was confirmed through a genotoxicity assay. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms in necrosis and apoptosis were conferred to depict the association of magnesium oxide nanoparticles with the human melanoma cancer cell line. The current study on MgO NPs showed a broad-scope understanding of the use of these nanoparticles as a medicinal drug for melanoma cancer via its physiological mechanism and also a novel route to obtain MgO NPs by using the green chemistry method. Full article
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24 pages, 6293 KiB  
Article
Biogenic Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles Using Pantoea stewartii and Priestia aryabhattai and Their Antimicrobial, Larvicidal, Histopathological, and Biotoxicity Potential
by Jeyaraj John Wilson, Thangamariyappan Harimuralikrishnaa, Thangavel Sivakumar, Shunmugiah Mahendran, Ponnirul Ponmanickam, Ramasamy Thangaraj, Subramanian Sevarkodiyone, Naiyf S. Alharbi, Shine Kadaikunnan, Baskar Venkidasamy, Muthu Thiruvengadam and Rajakumar Govindasamy
Bioengineering 2023, 10(2), 248; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10020248 - 13 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2109
Abstract
In recent years, green nanotechnology has gained considerable importance for the synthesis of nanoparticles due to its economic viability and biosafety. In the current study, silver nanoparticles were synthesized using two bacterial isolates, H2 and H3, which were isolated from soil samples collected [...] Read more.
In recent years, green nanotechnology has gained considerable importance for the synthesis of nanoparticles due to its economic viability and biosafety. In the current study, silver nanoparticles were synthesized using two bacterial isolates, H2 and H3, which were isolated from soil samples collected from the Western Ghats, Tamil Nadu, and identified at the species level as Pantoeastewartii (H2) and Priestiaaryabhattai (H3) by sequencing their 16s rRNA genes. Intracellularly synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by UV–visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and particle size analysis. AFM studies show that both of the bacterial synthesized Ag NPs were circular-shaped and disaggregated, with an average size distribution of 4 nm for Pantoeastewartii and 3.6 nm for Priestiaaryabhattai. Furthermore, their larvicidal activity, antimicrobial, histopathological, and biotoxicity effects were determined. The synthesized Ag NPs exhibited potent larvicidal activity against fourth instars of Ae.aegypti, An.stephensi, and Cx.quinquefasciatus exposed to a 50 µg/mL concentration for 24 h based on their LC50 and LC90 values. Histopathological studies of the affected mosquito larvae clearly show damage to the epithelial cells, food bolus, basement membrane, muscles, and midgut parts. The maximum antimicrobial activity of Priestiaaryabhattai-synthesized Ag NPs was observed for Streptomyces varsoviensis MTCC-1537, and that of Pantoea stewartii-synthesized Ag NPs was against Escherichia coli MTCC-43. The toxicity test on non-target organisms such as Artemia nauplii and zebrafish embryos indicates no visible abnormalities or mortality after their exposure for 48h. It is concluded that silver nanoparticles can easily be synthesized using Pantoea stewartii (H2) and Priestia aryabhattai (H3) as capping and reducing agents. Silver nanoparticles showed potent larvicidal activities and could potentially be used in integrated vector control programs because they are safe for other inhabitants of the same aquatic environment as mosquito larvae. Full article
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11 pages, 5085 KiB  
Article
Mild Positive Pressure Improves the Efficacy of Benzalkonium Chloride against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm
by Shamaila Tahir, Sarah Emanuel, David W. Inglis, Karen Vickery, Anand K. Deva and Honghua Hu
Bioengineering 2022, 9(9), 461; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering9090461 - 9 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1786
Abstract
Current protocols using liquid disinfectants to disinfect heat-sensitive hospital items frequently fail, as evidenced by the continued isolation of bacteria following decontamination. The contamination is, in part, due to biofilm formation. We hypothesize that mild positive pressure (PP) will disrupt this biofilm structure [...] Read more.
Current protocols using liquid disinfectants to disinfect heat-sensitive hospital items frequently fail, as evidenced by the continued isolation of bacteria following decontamination. The contamination is, in part, due to biofilm formation. We hypothesize that mild positive pressure (PP) will disrupt this biofilm structure and improve liquid disinfectant/detergent penetration to biofilm bacteria for improved killing. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm, grown on polycarbonate coupons in the biofilm reactor under shear at 35 °C for 3 days, was treated for 10 min and 60 min with various dilutions of benzalkonium chloride without PP at 1 atmosphere (atm), and with PP at 3, 5, 7, and 10 atm. The effect on biofilm and residual bacterial viability was determined by standard plate counts, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Combined use of benzalkonium chloride and PP up to 10 atm significantly increased biofilm killing up to 4.27 logs, as compared to the treatment using disinfectant alone. Microscopy results were consistent with the viability plate count results. PP improved disinfectant efficacy against bacterial biofilm. The use of mild PP is possible in many flow situations or if equipment/contaminated surfaces can be placed in a pressure chamber. Full article
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10 pages, 2582 KiB  
Article
Green Production and Interaction of Carboxylated CNTs/Biogenic ZnO Composite for Antibacterial Activity
by Saghir Hussain, Noorulain Khakwani, Yasir Faiz, Sonia Zulfiqar, Zahid Shafiq, Faisal Faiz, Abeer Elhakem, Rokayya Sami, N. I. Aljuraide, Tanveer Farid, Mahmood D. Aljabri and Mohammed M. Rahman
Bioengineering 2022, 9(9), 437; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering9090437 - 4 Sep 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1907
Abstract
Using biomolecule-rich plant extracts, the conversion of metal ions to metal oxide nanoparticles via abiogenic approach is highly intriguing, environmentally friendly, and quick. The inherent inclination of plant extracts function as capping agents in the insitu synthesis. In this study, biogenic zinc oxide [...] Read more.
Using biomolecule-rich plant extracts, the conversion of metal ions to metal oxide nanoparticles via abiogenic approach is highly intriguing, environmentally friendly, and quick. The inherent inclination of plant extracts function as capping agents in the insitu synthesis. In this study, biogenic zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO−NPs) were synthesized using an aqueous leaf extract from Moringaoleifera. The ZnO−NPs were then mixed with carboxylated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to create a carboxylated CNTs/biogenic ZnO composite using asol–gel method. The CNTs/ZnO composite displayed 18 mm, 16 mm, and 17 mm zones of inhibition (ZOI) against Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli, respectively. In contrast with ZnO−NPs, the produced carboxylated CNTs/ZnO composite demonstrated a 13 percent elevation in ZOI as antibacterial activity against Bacillus cereus ATCC 19659, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. The characterization of ZnO−NPs and the carboxylated CNTs/ZnO composite were performed via FTIR, UV/Vis spectroscopy, SEM, and XRD. The XRD pattern depicted a nano−sized crystalline structure (Wurtzite) of ZnO−NPs and a carboxylated CNTs/ZnO composite. The current work comprehends a valuable green technique for killing pathogenic bacteria, and gives fresh insights into the manufacture of metal oxide composites for future research. Full article
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16 pages, 1311 KiB  
Article
Adaptation of Bacteria to Antineoplastic Agents Involves Persister Cells and Increases Resistance to Antibiotics
by Carla C. C. R. de Carvalho
Bioengineering 2022, 9(8), 355; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering9080355 - 30 Jul 2022
Viewed by 1943
Abstract
The increasing number of life-threatening infections observed in cancer patients has been ascribed to chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and to invasive medical procedures such as surgery and the application of catheters. In this study, it was questioned if the infections could also be favored by [...] Read more.
The increasing number of life-threatening infections observed in cancer patients has been ascribed to chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and to invasive medical procedures such as surgery and the application of catheters. In this study, it was questioned if the infections could also be favored by an increased resistance of bacteria due to the adaptation to antineoplastic agents used in chemotherapy. After exposure to several antineoplastic agents, it was observed that cells of Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium vaccae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli changed the fatty acid profile of their cellular membranes, produced exopolymeric substances, and formed aggregates that adhered to surfaces. Additionally, when exposed to high concentrations of these compounds, a persister sub-population could be identified. After adaptation to antineoplastic agents, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of several antibiotics increased considerably in the tested strains. Full article
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