Special Issue "Sparkling Wine"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Belinda Kemp Website E-Mail
Cool Climate Oenology & Viticulture Institute (CCOVI), Brock University, Canada
Interests: sparkling wine; wine flavour; appassimento wines; red wine grape skin and seed tannin; winery techniques to manage phenolic levels and wine aroma compounds
Guest Editor
Prof. Richard Marchal Website E-Mail
Laboratoire d’œnologie et chimie appliquée (LOCA),Faculté des Sciences – BP 1039,51687 Reims Cédex 02,FRANCE
Interests: colloids; sparkling wine foam and effervescence; white wines fining; proteins; Botrytis cinerea; polysaccharides and aroma compounds

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sparkling wines are currently experiencing an increase in production and popularity worldwide, using diverse production methods and producing different wine styles, from a range of grape varieties. For this reason, sparkling wine research from the vineyard to the final wine, has intensified. This Special Issue intends to compile current research and revised information on sparkling wine, from viticultural effects on the final wine to winemaking topics, including yeast, base wine, sparkling wine chemical composition, second alcoholic fermentation, wine aging, aroma, sensory analysis, foam, and new varieties. Consumer-based studies are also welcome. Full articles, short communications and reviews are encouraged.

Dr. Belinda Kemp
Prof. Richard Marchal 
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Using Synchronous Fluorescence to Investigate Chemical Interactions Influencing Foam Characteristics in Sparkling Wines
Beverages 2019, 5(3), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages5030054 - 02 Sep 2019
Abstract
The appearance of bubbles and foam can influence the likeability of a wine even before its consumption. Since foams are essential to visual and taste attributes of sparkling wines, it is of great importance to understand which compounds affect bubbles and foam characteristics. [...] Read more.
The appearance of bubbles and foam can influence the likeability of a wine even before its consumption. Since foams are essential to visual and taste attributes of sparkling wines, it is of great importance to understand which compounds affect bubbles and foam characteristics. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of interactions among proteins, amino acids, and phenols on the characteristics of foam in sparkling wines by using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. Results have shown that several compounds present in sparkling wines influence foam quality differently, and importantly, highlighted how the interaction of those compounds might result in different effects on foam parameters. Amongst the results, mannoproteins were found to be most likely to promote foam and collar stability, while phenols were likely to increase the small bubbles and collar height in the foam matrix. In summary, this work contributes to a better understanding of the effect of wine compounds on foam quality as well as the effect of the interactions between those compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sparkling Wine)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommunication
Discrimination of Juice Press Fractions for Sparkling Base Wines by a UV-Vis Spectral Phenolic Fingerprint and Chemometrics
Beverages 2018, 4(2), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/beverages4020045 - 12 Jun 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
The feasibility of an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectral phenolic fingerprint (SPF), combined with principal component analysis (PCA), is evaluated as a rapid, simple, and reliable technique for the discrimination of grape juice press fractions destined for the production of sparkling white wines. Juice press [...] Read more.
The feasibility of an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectral phenolic fingerprint (SPF), combined with principal component analysis (PCA), is evaluated as a rapid, simple, and reliable technique for the discrimination of grape juice press fractions destined for the production of sparkling white wines. Juice press fractions of Vitis vinifera L. Chardonnay and Pinot noir grapes comprising free-run (i.e., juice released during the loading of press), cuvée (i.e., first press fraction), and taille (i.e., subsequent press fraction), were analyzed by SPF combined with multivariate data analysis. Two trials were carried out, a laboratory and a commercial scale trial. In both trials, cuvée and taille of Chardonnay and Pinot noir grapes were clearly separated in their corresponding PCA plots based on their SPF. The proposed method enables a rapid and objective discrimination of juice press fractions, which can be obtained using relatively inexpensive UV-Vis spectrophotometric equipment. Insights arising from this research suggest a future possibility of objective, real-time discrimination of juice quality that could liberate the winemaker from tasting juice at the press. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sparkling Wine)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop