Special Issue "Middle Atmosphere Dynamics"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Climatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 November 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Andrey Koval
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Atmospheric Physics Department, Saint‐Petersburg State University, 199034 Saint Petersburg, Russia
Interests: planetary wave-type oscillations; atmospheric dynamics; atmospheric waves; tides; numerical modeling; middle and upper atmosphere; sudden stratospheric warming
Dr. Alexander Pogoreltsev
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Meteorological Forecasts, Russian State Hydrometeorological University, 192007 Saint Petersburg, Russia
Interests: atmospheric dynamics; planetary wave-type oscillations; atmospheric waves; atmospheric tides; numerical modeling; middle and upper atmosphere; sudden stratospheric warming

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this Special Issue, the term “middle atmosphere” refers to the layer of the Earth's atmosphere between the upper troposphere and lower thermosphere, the dynamics of which is primarily characterized by an efficient momentum and energy exchange between the mean flow and atmospheric waves of various scales. These waves propagate upward from the lower layers of the atmosphere, and their amplitudes increase quasi-exponentially due to a decrease in the atmospheric density. Dissipating in the middle atmosphere, they contribute to the transfer of energy to the mean flow. Such extreme events as sudden stratospheric warmings which are formed in high-latitude winter stratosphere also have a significant impact on the dynamic and thermal regimes of the middle atmosphere. At low latitudes, the middle atmosphere is also affected by El-Nino–Southern oscillation and quasi-biennial oscillation. It is well known that “echoes” of these low-latitude phenomena are also observed in extratropical regions. A significant contribution to changes in the temperature regime and composition of the middle atmosphere is made by the Brewer–Dobson circulation, generated by large-scale waves, and determining the transfer of mass and atmospheric conservative species in the meridional plane. Dynamic events occurring in the middle atmosphere can also affect weather changes and climate anomalies in the troposphere, therefore, their study is one of the most important directions in atmospheric physics.

This Special Issue is intended to collect articles on the latest advances in numerical modeling, processing and analysis of observational data of dynamic processes in the middle atmosphere, including (but not limited to) analysis of inter-latitudinal and inter-hemispheric interactions, stratospheric warming events, atmospheric tides, gravity waves of various origin, etc. We welcome materials, including original and review articles on this topic, which are aimed at deepening our understanding and enhancing the ability to predict dynamic processes in the middle atmosphere that can influence, among other things, climate variability. The publications of the participants of the International Symposium on Atmospheric Radiation and Dynamics (ISARD-2021, https://events.spbu.ru/events/isard-2021?lang=Eng) will be considered in priority order. Participants of the symposium will be provided with a 20% discount of the article protcessing change. We also hope to collect contributions not only from the conference but also contributions from the whole community.

Dr. Andrey Koval
Dr. Alexander Pogoreltsev
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • atmospheric dynamics
  • planetary waves
  • gravity waves
  • atmospheric tides
  • numerical modeling
  • middle atmosphere
  • sudden stratospheric warming
  • Brewer–Dobson circulation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Arctic Stratosphere Circulation Changes in the 21st Century in Simulations of INM CM5
Atmosphere 2022, 13(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13010025 - 24 Dec 2021
Viewed by 351
Abstract
Simulations of Institute of Numerical Mathematics (INM) coupled climate model 5th version for the period from 2015 to 2100 under moderate (SSP2-4.5) and severe (SSP5-8.5) scenarios of greenhouse gases growth are analyzed to investigate changes of Arctic polar stratospheric vortex, planetary wave propagation, [...] Read more.
Simulations of Institute of Numerical Mathematics (INM) coupled climate model 5th version for the period from 2015 to 2100 under moderate (SSP2-4.5) and severe (SSP5-8.5) scenarios of greenhouse gases growth are analyzed to investigate changes of Arctic polar stratospheric vortex, planetary wave propagation, Sudden Stratospheric Warming frequency, Final Warming dates, and meridional circulation. Strengthening of wave activity propagation and a stationary planetary wave number 1 in the middle and upper stratosphere, acceleration of meridional circulation, an increase of winter mean polar stratospheric volume (Vpsc) and strengthening of Arctic stratosphere interannual variability after the middle of 21st century, especially under a severe scenario, were revealed. March monthly values of Vpsc in some winters could be about two times more than observed ones in the Arctic stratosphere in the spring of 2011 and 2020, which in turn could lead to large ozone layer destruction. Composite analysis shows that “warm” winters with the least winter mean Vpsc values are characterized by strengthening of wave activity propagation from the troposphere into the stratosphere in December but weaker propagation in January–February in comparison with winters having the largest Vpsc values. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Middle Atmosphere Dynamics)
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