Special Issue "Climate Change, Climatic Extremes, and Human Societies in the Past"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Climatology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Harry F. Lee
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography and Resource Management, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Interests: socio-economic and demographic impacts of climate change in ancient and recent human history; underlying mechanisms of climatic extremes; historical epidemiology; environmental perceptions and sustainability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I invite researchers, no matter whether they agree on the significant impact of climate change on human societies or whether they are skeptical about such relationship, to contribute original research articles, as well as review articles, dealing with all aspects of the climate–society nexus in ancient/recent human history. This Special Issue is going to serve as a platform for collecting different opinions and facilitating a constructive debate about the ways in which the climate–society nexus can be generalized, contextualized, or even denied—a philosophical issue pertinent to the theoretical underpinnings of environmental humanities. This Special Issue will also publish review articles that help identify possible future research directions. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to the following:

  • How and to what extent human societies are (or are not) affected by climate change or climatic extremes;
  • The use of big archaeological/historical data in investigating the climate–society nexus;
  • The application of statistical methods in quantitatively assessing the climate–society nexus;
  • The influence of spatio-temporal scale, study period, and study area on the climate–society nexus;
  • Philosophical discussion about the climate–society nexus.

Prof. Harry F. Lee
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Climatic extremes
  • Human societies
  • Adaptation to climate change
  • Climate resilience
  • Archaeology
  • History
  • Big data
  • Case study

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Contribution Rate of Driving Factors and Their Interactions to Temperature in the Yangtze River Delta Region
Atmosphere 2020, 11(1), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11010032 - 27 Dec 2019
Abstract
Complex temperature processes are the coupling results of natural and human processes, but few studies focused on the interactive effects between natural and human systems. Based on the dataset for temperature during the period of 1980–2012, we analyzed the complexity of temperature by [...] Read more.
Complex temperature processes are the coupling results of natural and human processes, but few studies focused on the interactive effects between natural and human systems. Based on the dataset for temperature during the period of 1980–2012, we analyzed the complexity of temperature by using the Correlation Dimension (CD) method. Then, we used the Geogdetector method to examine the effects of factors and their interactions on the temperature process in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD). The main conclusions are as follows: (1) the temperature rose 1.53 °C; and, among the dense areas of population and urban, the temperature rose the fastest. (2) The temperature process was more complicated in the sparse areas of population and urban than in the dense areas of population and urban. (3) The complexity of temperature dynamics increased along with the increase of temporal scale. To describe the temperature dynamic, at least two independent variables were needed at a daily scale, but at least three independent variables were needed at seasonal and annual scales. (4) Each driving factor did not work alone, but interacted with each other and had an enhanced effect on temperature. In addition, the interaction between economic activity and urban density had the largest influence on temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Climatic Extremes, and Human Societies in the Past)
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Open AccessArticle
Coupling of Soil Moisture and Air Temperature from Multiyear Data During 1980–2013 over China
Atmosphere 2020, 11(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos11010025 - 26 Dec 2019
Abstract
Soil moisture is an important parameter in land surface processes, which can control the surface energy and water budgets and thus affect the air temperature. Studying the coupling between soil moisture and air temperature is of vital importance for forecasting climate change. This [...] Read more.
Soil moisture is an important parameter in land surface processes, which can control the surface energy and water budgets and thus affect the air temperature. Studying the coupling between soil moisture and air temperature is of vital importance for forecasting climate change. This study evaluates this coupling over China from 1980–2013 by using an energy-based diagnostic method, which represents the momentum, heat, and water conservation equations in the atmosphere, while the contributions of soil moisture are treated as external forcing. The results showed that the soil moisture–temperature coupling is strongest in the transitional climate zones between wet and dry climates, which here includes Northeast China and part of the Tibetan Plateau from a viewpoint of annual average. Furthermore, the soil moisture–temperature coupling was found to be stronger in spring than in the other seasons over China, and over different typical climatic zones, it also varied greatly in different seasons. We conducted two case studies (the heatwaves of 2013 in Southeast China and 2009 in North China) to understand the impact of soil moisture–temperature coupling during heatwaves. The results indicated that over areas with soil moisture deficit and temperature anomalies, the coupling strength intensified. This suggests that soil moisture deficits could lead to enhanced heat anomalies, and thus, result in enhanced soil moisture coupling with temperature. This demonstrates the importance of soil moisture and the need to thoroughly study it and its role within the land–atmosphere interaction and the climate on the whole. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Climatic Extremes, and Human Societies in the Past)
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