Special Issue "Long-Term Research on the Quality of Air and the Trends of Its Variability"

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433). This special issue belongs to the section "Air Quality".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Liudmila Golobokova
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Limnological Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Irkutsk, Russia
Interests: aerosol; Antarctic ice; Arctic; Baikal region; chemical composition
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is our pleasure to present a new Special Issue dedicated to long-term research on the most dynamic atmospheric components: gases, aerosols, and atmospheric precipitations. Gaps in knowledge of the properties of atmospheric air, environmental processes, where gaseous and aerosol particles are involved in, and the connection between activities for environmental protection and policy decisions in the field of international agreements on climate change issues have resulted in a stable significant increase in long-term research on this topic. 

Many studies were included in national and international projects, and the number of scientific forums increased over the years. In 1960–1970, the developed countries of Europe and North America faced the problem of acid depositions characterized by fugitive SO2 emissions, which led to serious ecological consequences primarily connected with the acidification of the environment. This led to the establishment of the atmospheric deposition monitoring system and efforts to reduce the emissions of sulfur and other hazardous substances. These activities resulted in considerable progressive improvement in the ecological situation in Europe as a whole.

Complex international projects, connected with research on global climate change and environmental pollution, usually contain atmosphere–ocean–land interplay clusters focused on the study of atmospheric aerosol properties and their role in various biogeochemical cycles in the biosphere. Special attention was given to the study of the cycle of carbon in the Arctic Region. Meteorological conditions, synoptical processes, volcanic activity, wildfires, dust storms, industry, and many other natural and anthropogenic factors significantly affect the quality of air.

This Special Issue aims to establish a community of authors and readers to discuss long-term research on the quality of air and follow trends in the dynamics of its variability. We welcome studies dedicated to the various fields of air quality and its variability analyses. 

Dr. Liudmila Golobokova
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • optical depth
  • particle concentration
  • atmospheric chemistry
  • monitoring
  • sources
  • effects on neighboring territories
  • factors
  • dynamic projection

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Analysis and Sources Identification of Atmospheric PM10 and Its Cation and Anion Contents in Makkah, Saudi Arabia
Atmosphere 2022, 13(1), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos13010087 - 06 Jan 2022
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Abstract
In this paper, atmospheric water-soluble cation and anion contents of PM10 are analysed in Makkah, Saudi Arabia. PM10 samples were collected at five sites for a whole year. PM10 concentrations (µg/m3) ranged from 82.11 to 739.61 at Aziziyah, [...] Read more.
In this paper, atmospheric water-soluble cation and anion contents of PM10 are analysed in Makkah, Saudi Arabia. PM10 samples were collected at five sites for a whole year. PM10 concentrations (µg/m3) ranged from 82.11 to 739.61 at Aziziyah, 65.37 to 421.71 at Sanaiyah, 25.20 to 466.60 at Misfalah, 52.56 to 507.23 at Abdeyah, and 40.91 to 471.99 at Askan. Both daily and annual averaged PM10 concentrations exceeded WHO and Saudi Arabia national air quality limits. Daily averaged PM10 concentration exceeded the national air quality limits of 340 µg/m3, 32% of the time at Aziziyah, 8% of the time at Sanaiyah, and 6% of the time at the other three sites. On average, the cations and anions made a 37.81% contribution to the PM10 concentrations. SO42−, NO3, Ca2+, Na+, and Cl contributed 50.25%, 16.43%, 12.11%, 11.12%, and 8.70% to the total ion concentrations, respectively. The minor ions (F, Br, Mg2+, NO2, and PO43−) contributed just over 1% to the ion mass. Four principal components explained 89% variations in PM10 concentrations. Four major emission sources were identified: (a) Road traffic, including emission from the exhaust, wear-and-tear, and the resuspension of dust particles (F, SO42−, NO3, Ca2+, Na+, Mg+, Br, Cl, NO2, PO43−); (b) Mineral dust (Cl, F, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, PO43−); (c) Industries and construction–demolition work (F, SO42−, Ca2+, Mg2+); and (d) Seaspray and marine aerosols (Cl, Br, Mg2+, Na+). Future work would include an analysis of the metal contents of PM10 and their spatiotemporal variability in Makkah. Full article
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Article
Estimation of Biogas Generated in Two Landfills in South-Central Ecuador
Atmosphere 2021, 12(10), 1365; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos12101365 - 19 Oct 2021
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Abstract
The landfill is a final disposal technique to confine municipal solid waste (MSW), where organic matter is degraded generating leachate and biogas composed of methane gases (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2) and other gases that contribute to global warming. The [...] Read more.
The landfill is a final disposal technique to confine municipal solid waste (MSW), where organic matter is degraded generating leachate and biogas composed of methane gases (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2) and other gases that contribute to global warming. The objective of the current research was to estimate the amount of biogas generated through the LandGEM 3.03 mathematical model to determine the amount of electrical energy generated and the number of homes that would be supplied with electrical energy from 2021 to 2144. As a result of the application, it was estimated that in the Pichacay landfill, the highest point of biogas generation in 2053 would be 76,982,177 (m3/year) that would generate 81,226,339.36 (kWh/year), and would supply 5083 homes with electricity. Similarly, in the Las Iguanas landfill, the highest point would be 693,975,228 (m3/year) of biogas that produces 73,223,5296.7 (kWh/year) and would supply electricity to 45,825 homes. Of the performed gas analyses in the Pichacay landfill in 2020, an average of 51.49% CH4, 40.35% CO2, 1.75% O2 and 17.8% H2S was presented, while in the Las Iguanas landfill, for 2020 and 2021, we obtained an average of 51.88/CH4, 36.62% CO2, 1.01% O2 and 187.58 ppm H2S. Finally, the biogas generated by being harnessed minimizes the impacts related to global warming and climate change and would contribute electricity to the nearby communities. Full article
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