Special Issue "Molecular Sensing Technologies"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 May 2022) | Viewed by 1026

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Bobby Pejcic
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Mineral Resources, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, 3169 Canberra, Australia
Interests: chemical sensing; vibrational spectroscopy; materials chemistry; carbon capture and environmental analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Humanity’s ability to thrive on Earth is primarily due to many important substances and materials that are present in the environment. Our planet comprises countless different molecules, many of them are either essential for survival or play a significant role in our advancement, while numerous others are relatively toxic and hazardous to life. The health and state of the biosphere requires endless monitoring to ensure that the existence of life flourishes into the future. Analytical technologies that provide direct quantitative information in real-time offer many advantages compared to traditional laboratory methods. The demand for more rapid, reliable, accurate and cost-effective analysis is driving the need for sensors and sensing technologies.

This Special Issue “Molecular Sensing Technologies” aims to reflect recent developments in the field of sensors and sensing devices for the analysis of inorganic, organic, biological and gas molecules. It will present new advances and applications in molecular sensing of the atmosphere, hydrosphere and geosphere. Sensor applications that deal with environmental, mining, agricultural, food and biomedical samples are encouraged. The type of molecular sensors the Special Issue covers is not limited and includes sensors based on optical, electrical/electrochemical, piezoelectric, mass and thermal transduction. This issue invites researchers to contribute original research as well as review articles.  

I hope this Special Issue works as a roadmap for all researchers and users of analytical sensing technologies.

Dr. Bobby Pejcic
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Sensing Hydrogen Seeps in the Subsurface for Natural Hydrogen Exploration
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(13), 6383; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12136383 - 23 Jun 2022
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Abstract
The recent detection of natural hydrogen seeps in sedimentary basin settings has triggered significant interest in the exploration of this promising resource. If large economical resources exist and can be extracted from the sub-surface, this would provide an opportunity for natural hydrogen to [...] Read more.
The recent detection of natural hydrogen seeps in sedimentary basin settings has triggered significant interest in the exploration of this promising resource. If large economical resources exist and can be extracted from the sub-surface, this would provide an opportunity for natural hydrogen to contribute to the non-carbon-based energy mix. The detection and exploration of hydrogen gas in the sub-surface is a significant challenge that requires costly drilling, sophisticated instrumentation, and reliable analytical/sampling methods. Here, we propose the application of a commercial-based sensor that can be used to detect and monitor low levels of hydrogen gas emissions from geological environments. The sensitivity, selectivity (K > 1000), and stability (<1 ppm/day) of the sensor was evaluated under various conditions to determine its suitability for geological field monitoring. Calibration tests showed that the hydrogen readings from the sensor were within ±20% of the expected values. We propose that chemical sensing is a simple and feasible method for understanding natural hydrogen seeps that emanate from geological systems and formations. However, we recommend using this sensor as part of a complete geological survey that incorporates an understanding of the geology along with complementary techniques that provide information on the rock properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Sensing Technologies)
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Review

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Review
Infrared Spectroscopy–Quo Vadis?
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(15), 7598; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12157598 - 28 Jul 2022
Viewed by 264
Abstract
Given the exquisite capability of direct, non-destructive label-free sensing of molecular transitions, IR spectroscopy has become a ubiquitous and versatile analytical tool. IR application scenarios range from industrial manufacturing processes, surveillance tasks and environmental monitoring to elaborate evaluation of (bio)medical samples. Given recent [...] Read more.
Given the exquisite capability of direct, non-destructive label-free sensing of molecular transitions, IR spectroscopy has become a ubiquitous and versatile analytical tool. IR application scenarios range from industrial manufacturing processes, surveillance tasks and environmental monitoring to elaborate evaluation of (bio)medical samples. Given recent developments in associated fields, IR spectroscopic devices increasingly evolve into reliable and robust tools for quality control purposes, for rapid analysis within at-line, in-line or on-line processes, and even for bed-side monitoring of patient health indicators. With the opportunity to guide light at or within dedicated optical structures, remote sensing as well as high-throughput sensing scenarios are being addressed by appropriate IR methodologies. In the present focused article, selected perspectives on future directions for IR spectroscopic tools and their applications are discussed. These visions are accompanied by a short introduction to the historic development, current trends, and emerging technological opportunities guiding the future path IR spectroscopy may take. Highlighted state-of-the art implementations along with novel concepts enhancing the performance of IR sensors are presented together with cutting-edge developments in related fields that drive IR spectroscopy forward in its role as a versatile analytical technology with a bright past and an even brighter future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Sensing Technologies)
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