Special Issue "Effects of Mineral Elements on the Environment"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Earth Sciences and Geography".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Marina Cabral Pinto
Website
Guest Editor
GeoBioTec, Department of Geosciences, University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: environmental geochemistry; medical mineralogy; medical geology; international geochemical mapping; water quality; soil quality; dust quality; health risk assessment; heavy metals; potentially toxic elements; epidemiology; neurosciences
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Dr. Amit Kumar
Website
Guest Editor
Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, School of Hydrology and Water Resources (Eco-hydrology Group), Ningliu Road No. 219, Nanjing, Jiangsu, 210044, China
Interests: Biogeochemistry; Environmental Impact Assessment; Environment; Sediments; Soil Analysis; Soil Chemistry; Gas; Climate Change; Water Quality; Rivers
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of medical mineralogy and geochemistry is an emergent and extremely interdisciplinary area of study. Geochemistry and mineralogy play an essential role in cross-disciplinary research, with a view to understanding not just how humans and geomaterials interact, but also how inorganic solid precipitates are formed in vivo, both normally and pathologically. Research methods and strategies include studies of the solubility and stability of biomaterials within biofluids or their proxies and earth materials (i.e., studies of thermodynamic equilibrium), the kinetic study of apposite reactions that take place under conditions which are pertinent to human bodies, studies of molecular modelling and of the geospatial and statistical, the aim being an evaluation of how certain chronic diseases can be activated by environmental factors in certain individuals or populations with a genetic predisposition.

Medical mineralogy and geochemistry is acknowledged to be an important field, yet little attention has been paid to it by scientists, administrators, or the public. The aims of this volume are a) to focus on a selection of current challenges and research opportunities, and b) to encourage knowledge transfer between geochemists and mineralogists whose work concerns medical problems and medical scientists who study problems touching on biominerals and geomaterials.

Cases in point may comprise tooth and bone biomineralization, bioactive, biocompatible ceramics and their design for use in dental and orthopedic implants, artery calcification and kidney stone formation, the effect of inhaling dust particles on the lungs, developing biosensors via oxide-encapsulated living cells, the environmental transport of pathological viruses and prions, the potential environment–genetic link in neurodegenerative diseases, the pathological results of heavy metal contamination and speciation exposure pathways, and associated applications of tissue engineering.

Dr. Marina Cabral Pinto
Dr. Amit Kumar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Toxicology
  • rare earth elements
  • health risk
  • environmental chemistry
  • biogeochemical
  • ecological health
  • medical mineralogy
  • soil health

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Identifying Groundwater Fluoride Source in a Weathered Basement Aquifer in Central Malawi: Human Health and Policy Implications
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(14), 5006; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10145006 - 21 Jul 2020
Abstract
Consumption of groundwater containing fluoride exceeding World Health Organization (WHO) 1.5 mg/L standard leaves people vulnerable to fluorosis: a vulnerability not well characterised in Malawi. To evaluate geogenic fluoride source and concentration, groundwater fluoride and geology was documented in central Malawi where groundwater [...] Read more.
Consumption of groundwater containing fluoride exceeding World Health Organization (WHO) 1.5 mg/L standard leaves people vulnerable to fluorosis: a vulnerability not well characterised in Malawi. To evaluate geogenic fluoride source and concentration, groundwater fluoride and geology was documented in central Malawi where groundwater supplies are mainly sourced from the weathered basement aquifer. Lithological composition was shown as the main control on fluoride occurrence. Augen gneiss of granitic composition posed the greatest geological fluoride risk. The weathered basement aquifer profile was the main factor controlling fluoride distributions. These results and fluoride-lithology statistical analysis allowed the development of a graded map of geological fluoride risk. A direct link to human health risk (dental fluorosis) from geological fluoride was quantified to support science-led policy change for fluoride in rural drinking water in Malawi. Hazard quotient (HQ) values were calculated and assigned to specific water points, depending on user age group; in this case, 74% of children under six were shown to be vulnerable to dental fluorosis. Results are contrary to current standard for fluoride in Malawi groundwater of 6 mg/L, highlighting the need for policy change. Detailed policy recommendations are presented based on the results of this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Mineral Elements on the Environment)
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Open AccessArticle
Retrieval of Turbidity on a Spatio-Temporal Scale Using Landsat 8 SR: A Case Study of the Ramganga River in the Ganges Basin, India
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(11), 3702; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10113702 - 27 May 2020
Abstract
Nowadays, space-borne imaging spectro-radiometers are exploited for many environmental applications, including water quality monitoring. Turbidity is a standout amongst the essential parameters of water quality that affect productivity. The current study aims to utilize Landsat 8 surface reflectance (L8SR) to retrieve turbidity in [...] Read more.
Nowadays, space-borne imaging spectro-radiometers are exploited for many environmental applications, including water quality monitoring. Turbidity is a standout amongst the essential parameters of water quality that affect productivity. The current study aims to utilize Landsat 8 surface reflectance (L8SR) to retrieve turbidity in the Ramganga River, a tributary of the Ganges River. Samples of river water were collected from 16 different locations on 13 March and 27 November 2014. L8SR images from 6 March and 17 November 2014 were downloaded from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) website. The algorithm to retrieve turbidity is based on the correlation between L8SR reflectance (single and ratio bands) and insitu data. The b2/b4 and b2/b3 bands ratio are proven to be the best predictors of turbidity, with R2 = 0.560 (p < 0.05) and R2 = 0.726 (p < 0.05) for March and November, respectively. Selected models are validated by comparing the concentrations of predicted and measured turbidity. The results showed that L8SR is a promising tool for monitoring surface water from space, even in relatively narrow river channels, such as the Ramganga River. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Mineral Elements on the Environment)
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Open AccessArticle
Enhanced Phosphorus Removal from Wastewater Using RSPRC and a Novel Reactor
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(10), 3629; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10103629 - 24 May 2020
Abstract
Fly ash and steel slag both have a good adsorption performance and many researchers have mixed the two to make effective adsorbents. Based on previous knowledge, activated clay is added in this study. In order to deep dephosphorize wastewater, two different industrial wastes [...] Read more.
Fly ash and steel slag both have a good adsorption performance and many researchers have mixed the two to make effective adsorbents. Based on previous knowledge, activated clay is added in this study. In order to deep dephosphorize wastewater, two different industrial wastes (steel slag, fly ash) are blended into activated clay as adsorption substrates, supplemented with a binder and foaming agent to prepare a Residue and Soil Phosphorus Removal Composite (RSPRC). This is prepared to carry out experimental research on the decolorization effect and phosphorus removal characteristics of RSPRC. Meanwhile, a self-developed concentric circular diversion wall adsorption reactor is implemented to study the effect of phosphorus removal. It is found that the addition of activated clay can significantly improve the phosphorus removal performance. The results suggest that the phosphorus concentration in the effluent from the reactor can be stably reduced to below 0.10 mg/L. The concentric circular diversion wall adsorption reactor and RSPRC will have broad application prospects in phosphorus removal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Mineral Elements on the Environment)
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