Special Issue "Research on the Production and Mechanical Properties of Multilayer Materials"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Materials Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 January 2023 | Viewed by 2303

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ireneusz Szachogluchowicz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Machine Design, Military University of Technology, en. Sylwestra Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: multilayer materials; mechanical properties; strength of materials welded connections; additive manufacturing; digital image correlation; ballistic resistance; innovative joining
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Janusz Torzewski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Military University of Technology, 2 gen.S.Kaliskiego St., 00-908 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: multilayer materials; mechanical properties; strength of materials welded connections; additive manufacturing; digital image correlation; ballistic resistance; innovative joining
Dr. Marcin Wachowski
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Military University of Technology, 2 gen.S.Kaliskiego St., 00-908 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: advanced joining processes; explosive welding; friction stir welding; laser welding; cladding; multilayer materials; materials characterization; heat treatment; light alloys; ceramic–metal composites; slip casting
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Designing, manufacturing, and defining new applications for multilayer materials offer great prospects for contemporary constructions. Multilayer materials have unique advantages over monolithic materials, such as high strength, high stiffness, low density, and the ability to adapt to the intended function of the structure. The main aim of the production of layered materials is usually to obtain materials with increased strength properties, in particular increased fatigue strength, as well as increased fracture resistance, ballistic resistance, chemical resistance, and resistance to environmental factors. Research is still ongoing on the selection of appropriate materials and innovative techniques for combining various materials. The enormous potential of multilayer materials allows obtaining a wide range of properties that have advantages over monolithic materials. It is, therefore, logical to attempt to obtain the greatest possible reduction of mass in relation to the bearing capacity (durability) of engineering structures. An additional factor significantly influencing the development directions of modern construction materials is the continuous increase in the requirements of optimized production processes and the introduction of increasingly stringent safety standards and norms for finished products.

The proposed Special Issue will cover all areas related to theory and methodology, science, technology, and functional and structural applications of multilayer materials. The Special Issue includes combinations of metals and alloys, polymer matrices, ceramics, and materials produced using additive techniques, e.g., 3D printing.

Dr. Ireneusz Szachogluchowicz
Dr. Janusz Torzewski
Dr. Marcin Wachowski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • multilayers
  • layered material
  • laminates
  • sandwich composites
  • light alloys
  • metals
  • metal alloys
  • polymers
  • plastics
  • manufacture of layered materials
  • applications
  • mechanical properties
  • advanced materials characterization
  • explosive welding
  • bonding

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Laser Welding of UNS S33207 Hyper-Duplex Stainless Steel to 6061 Aluminum Alloy Using High Entropy Alloy as a Filler Material
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(6), 2849; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12062849 - 10 Mar 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 779
Abstract
The high entropy alloy (HEA) filler used during the fabrication method determines the reliability of HEAs for steel-aluminum dissimilar alloy configuration. HEAs have a direct impact on the formation of intermetallic compounds (IMC) formed by the interaction of iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al), [...] Read more.
The high entropy alloy (HEA) filler used during the fabrication method determines the reliability of HEAs for steel-aluminum dissimilar alloy configuration. HEAs have a direct impact on the formation of intermetallic compounds (IMC) formed by the interaction of iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al), and influence the size of the joint’s interaction zone. A novel welding process for Fe-Al alloy joints was developed to prevent the development of a brittle iron-aluminum interface. This research involved investigation of the possibility of using HEA powdered filler. Fe5Co20Ni20Mn35Cu20 HEAs was used as a filler for the laser joining lap configuration joining hyper-duplex stainless steel UNS S33207 to aluminum alloy 6061. This HEA has unique properties, such as high strength, good ductility, and high resistance to corrosion and wear. A tiny portion of the stainless-steel area was melted by varying the welding parameters. The high-entropy alloy (HEA) with slow kinetic diffusion and large entropy was employed to aid in producing solid solution structures, impeding the blending of iron and aluminum particles and hindering the development of Fe-Al IMCs. The weld seam was created without the use of Fe-Al IMCs,. The specimen broke at the HEAs/Al alloy interface with a tensile-shear strength of 237 MPa. The tensile-shear strength achieved was 12.86% higher than for the base metal AA 6061 and 75.57% lower than for the UNS S33207 hyper-duplex stainless steel. Full article
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Article
Impact of Magnetic-Pulse and Chemical-Thermal Treatment on Alloyed Steels’ Surface Layer
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(1), 469; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12010469 - 04 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 308
Abstract
The relevant problem is searching for up-to-date methods to improve tools and machine parts’ performance due to the hardening of surface layers. This article shows that, after the magnetic-pulse treatment of bearing steel Cr15, its surface microhardness was increased by 40–50% compared to [...] Read more.
The relevant problem is searching for up-to-date methods to improve tools and machine parts’ performance due to the hardening of surface layers. This article shows that, after the magnetic-pulse treatment of bearing steel Cr15, its surface microhardness was increased by 40–50% compared to baseline. In this case, the depth of the hardened layer was 0.08–0.1 mm. The magnetic-pulse processing of hard alloys reduces the coefficient of microhardness variation from 0.13 to 0.06. A decrease in the coefficient of variation of wear resistance from 0.48 to 0.27 indicates the increased stability of physical and mechanical properties. The nitriding of alloy steels was accelerated 10-fold that of traditional gas upon receipt of the hardened layer depth of 0.3–0.5 mm. As a result, the surface hardness was increased to 12.7 GPa. Boriding in the nano-dispersed powder was accelerated 2–3-fold compared to existing technologies while ensuring surface hardness up to 21–23 GPa with a boride layer thickness of up to 0.073 mm. Experimental data showed that the cutting tool equipped with inserts from WC92Co8 and WC79TiC15 has a resistance relative to the untreated WC92Co8 higher by 183% and WC85TiC6Co9—than 200%. Depending on alloy steel, nitriding allowed us to raise wear resistance by 120–177%, boriding—by 180–340%, and magneto-pulse treatment—by more than 183–200%. Full article
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Article
Are We Able to Print Components as Strong as Injection Molded?—Comparing the Properties of 3D Printed and Injection Molded Components Made from ABS Thermoplastic
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(15), 6946; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11156946 - 28 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 634
Abstract
In this paper, we are focusing on comparing results obtained for polymer elements manufactured with injection molding and additive manufacturing techniques. The analysis was performed for fused deposition modeling (FDM) and single screw injection molding with regards to the standards used in thermoplastics [...] Read more.
In this paper, we are focusing on comparing results obtained for polymer elements manufactured with injection molding and additive manufacturing techniques. The analysis was performed for fused deposition modeling (FDM) and single screw injection molding with regards to the standards used in thermoplastics processing technology. We argue that the cross-section structure of the sample obtained via FDM is the key factor in the fabrication of high-strength components and that the dimensions of the samples have a strong influence on the mechanical properties. Large cross-section samples, 4 × 10 mm2, with three perimeter layers and 50% infill, have lower mechanical strength than injection molded reference samples—less than 60% of the strength. However, if we reduce the cross-section dimensions down to 2 × 4 mm2, the samples will be more durable, reaching up to 110% of the tensile strength observed for the injection molded samples. In the case of large cross-section samples, strength increases with the number of contour layers, leading to an increase of up to 97% of the tensile strength value for 11 perimeter layer samples. The mechanical strength of the printed components can also be improved by using lower values of the thickness of the deposited layers. Full article
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