Special Issue "The Contribution of Geology and Geomatics to Seismic Hazard and Earthquake Engineering"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Earth Sciences and Geography".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Javier Elez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Geology Department, Science Faculty, University of Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, 37008 Salamanca, Spain
Interests: tectonic geomorphology; GIS modeling; earthquake geology; active tectonics
Prof. Dr. Jorge L. Giner-Robles
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Geology and Geochemistry Department, Science Faculty, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Cantoblanco, Spain
Interests: structural geology; tectonics and earthquake geology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, a prominent body of knowledge related to the geology of the earthquakes has provided new insights into seismic phenomena. The study of geology of present earthquakes allows a better understanding of the whole set of natural processes involved. The study of events from the past allows providing more comprehensive data within the temporal range (recurrence periods) of the seismic cycle and therefore completing the seismic catalogues and incorporating long-term data into seismic hazard assessment. The introduction of geological analysis of earthquakes, mainly based on the application of the Environmental Seismic Intensity Scale (ESI-07), also allows the parameterization of environmental earthquake effects and the emergence of multiple modeling procedures to assess intensity, hazard, risk, emergency scenarios, etc., most of them based on the application of GIS technologies.

The objective of this Special Issue on “The Contribution of Geology and Geomatics to Seismic Hazard and Earthquake Engineering” is to provide the latest advances, uses, and case studies related to the multiple applications of geological analysis of earthquakes.

Dr. Javier Elez
Prof. Dr. Jorge L. Giner-Robles
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Earthquake effects
  • Tectonic geomorphology
  • Active tectonics
  • GIS modeling
  • Seismic hazard analysis
  • Monitoring
  • Historical earthquakes
  • Seismic scenarios

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Revisiting the Most Destructive Earthquake Sequence in the Recent History of Greece: Environmental Effects Induced by the 9, 11 and 12 August 1953 Ionian Sea Earthquakes
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(18), 8429; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11188429 - 11 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 333
Abstract
The August 1953 seismic sequence comprised the most destructive events in the recent history of Greece. The mainshock on 12 August, and its foreshocks on 9 and 11 August, devastated the southern Ionian Islands. The existing literature emphasized the destructive effects of the [...] Read more.
The August 1953 seismic sequence comprised the most destructive events in the recent history of Greece. The mainshock on 12 August, and its foreshocks on 9 and 11 August, devastated the southern Ionian Islands. The existing literature emphasized the destructive effects of the earthquakes on buildings, as well as to the emergency response and recovery actions. This resulted in a large gap in capturing the full picture of the earthquake’s environmental effects. The present study aims to fill this gap by reconstructing the most complete picture possible of the primary and secondary effects on the environment of the southern Ionian Islands by the August 1953 earthquakes. This reconstruction is based on all available sources, comprising not only the existing scientific literature, but especially sources that have not been considered to date, including newspapers of local and national circulation. In total, 120 cases of the earthquake’s environmental effects were identified, comprised of 33 cases of primary and 87 cases of secondary effects. In descending order of occurrence, slope failures, co-seismic uplift, hydrological anomalies, ground cracks, tsunami, liquefaction, dust clouds, hydrocarbon-related phenomena, jumping stones and vegetation effects were distributed mainly in Cephalonia Island and secondarily in the Ithaki and Zakythos Islands. The primary effects were mainly detected in eastern Cephalonia, which presented uplift of up to 70 cm, while the majority of the secondary effects were triggered in specific zones with characteristics that made them susceptible to the occurrence of earthquake-related hazards. Full article
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Article
Primary and Secondary Environmental Effects Triggered by the 30 October 2020, Mw = 7.0, Samos (Eastern Aegean Sea, Greece) Earthquake Based on Post-Event Field Surveys and InSAR Analysis
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(7), 3281; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11073281 - 06 Apr 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1099
Abstract
On 30 October 2020, an Mw = 7.0 earthquake struck the eastern Aegean Sea. It triggered earthquake environmental effects (EEEs) on Samos Island detected by field surveys, relevant questionnaires, and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) analysis. The primary EEEs detected in the field [...] Read more.
On 30 October 2020, an Mw = 7.0 earthquake struck the eastern Aegean Sea. It triggered earthquake environmental effects (EEEs) on Samos Island detected by field surveys, relevant questionnaires, and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) analysis. The primary EEEs detected in the field comprise coseismic uplift imprinted on rocky coasts and port facilities around Samos and coseismic surface ruptures in northern Samos. The secondary EEEs were mainly observed in northern Samos and include slope failures, liquefaction, hydrological anomalies, and ground cracks. With the contribution of the InSAR, subsidence was detected and slope movements were also identified in inaccessible areas. Moreover, the type of the surface deformation detected by InSAR is qualitatively identical to field observations. As regards the EEE distribution, effects were generated in all fault blocks. By applying the Environmental Seismic Intensity (ESI-07) scale, the maximum intensities were observed in northern Samos. Based on the results from the applied methods, it is suggested that the northern and northwestern parts of Samos constitute an almost 30-km-long coseismic deformation zone characterized by extensive primary and secondary EEEs. The surface projection of the causative offshore northern Samos fault points to this zone, indicating a depth–surface connection and revealing a significant role in the rupture propagation. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. TitleSeismic Hazard assessment implications through ESI-07 ShakeMap modelling of historical earthquakes (SE of Spain).

Authors: Giner-Robles, J.L., Elez, J., Silva, P.G., Pérez-López, R.,  Canora, C., Rodríguez-Escudero, E., Ramos, A., Rodríguez-Pascua, M.A., Roquero, E.

2. Title:  Earthquake Oriented Damage Patterns applied for managing collapsed urban areas

Authors: Raúl Pérez-López, Jorge L. Giner-Robles, Miguel A. Rodríguez-Pascua, Pablo G. Silva and Javier Elez

Abstract: Destructive earthquakes affecting cities and urban areas are responsible for catastrophic scenarios that are hard to face by rescue teams and management authorities. Beyond loss lives and economic costs, the "on sight" management of these scenarios for recovering essential services normally depends on the time of strong aftershock occurrence for evaluating collapsed buildings. In this work, we present a quick-semi quantitative methodology for depicting green-lanes into an urban zone for the safe movement of rescue team during the earthquake seismic management. This methodology is based on horizontal S wave propagation from the seismogenic fault, the map of oriented damage that allows the modeling of the seismic patter ground vibration, and the fault parameters. We have applied this methodology both in real cases: (a) historical and instrumental earthquakes, such as Emilia Romana earthquake, Italy, 2012, M6 and Acambay earthquake, Mexico, 1912, M 7, as (b) earthquake drill for preparedness of the Civil Protection Teams.

3. Title:  Archaeoseismological evidences of the Medina Azahara destruction (Córdoba, Spain)

Authors: M.A. Rodríguez-Pascua, M.A. Perucha, A.J. Montejo Córdoba, P.G. Silva, J.L. Giner, J. Élez, T. Bardají y E. Roquero

4. Title: Reappraisal of the most important earthquakes of the Ischia Island (Naples, Italy) since the XIX century, through the 2007 ESI-07 intensity scale.

Authors: Porfido S., Alessio G., Gaudiosi G., Michetti A. M., Spiga E., Nappi R. 

5. What if a strong earthquake hits Spain? Estimating the potential consequences of Spanish historical earthquakes in present times.
Elez, J., Silva, P.G., Giner-Róbles, J.L., Pérez-López, R., et al.

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