Special Issue "Biomaterials, Nanomaterials and Microbiota Biofilm Control in Dentistry"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Dentistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Biagio Rapone
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Neurosciences and Sense Organs, Bari, Italy; “Aldo Moro” University of Bari, 70122 Bari, Italy
Interests: type I Diabetes; childood; adolescence; pediatric diabetes; systemic inflammation; peripheral inflammation; dentistry; malignant tumours; endocrine system; endocrinology; tumor aggressiveness
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oral implantology, periodontology, oral surgery, prosthesis, and materials science are strongly interconnected research fields. The study of medical devices requires knowledge of synthetic and biological materials which, of course, are characterized by significantly different physical, chemical and mechanical properties. The devices are made by selecting materials that have appropriate chemical, mechanical, thermal, electrical, optical characteristics, etc.; they are naturally related to the chemical nature of the material and its structure. It is common practice to identify the properties of materials with the results of tests carried out in order to measure these properties.The Special Issue “Biomaterials, Nanomaterials and microbiota biofilm control in Dentistry” invites worldwide investigators as well as clinicians who are confident in applied biosciences research to submit their most interesting overviews, reviews, and original articles that may provide novel insights regarding multidisciplinary research in the field of biomedicine and biological engineering applications.We invite authors to submit original research articles about biomaterials used in fields of oral implantology, periodontology, oral surgery, prosthesis, and materials science. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are also welcome if they provide new sound scientific evidence in these fields.Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:New biomaterials and/or grafting techniques for bone regeneration;· New biomaterials and/or techniques for peri-implant soft tissue management;· New dental implant macro and microdesigns for the improvement of osseointegration;· New technologies to avoid implant corrosion or degradation;· New concepts on microbiota biofilm control around to teeth or dental implants.We hope that new ideas will promote a fast development of these exciting topics, and we invite you to submit to this Special Issue the best of your research activities.

Dr. Biagio Rapone
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • oral implantology
  • bone augmentation
  • biomaterials
  • peri-implant soft tissue management
  • bioengineering
  • biomedicine
  • bioscaffolds
  • systemic diseases
  • general health
  • oral health
  • quality of life
  • microbiota
  • microbiome
  • oral diseases
  • periodontal diseases
  • oral–systemic relationship
  • microstructured surfaces
  • cell adhesion

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Comparative Analysis of the Stability of Prosthetic Screws under Cyclic Loading in Implant Prosthodontics: An In Vitro Study
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(2), 622; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11020622 - 11 Jan 2021
Abstract
Background: To compare the loss of preload in absence of loading and after a fixed number of cyclic loadings on 7-mm distal cantilever in two different connection systems using all-on-four prosthetic model. Methods: Two equal models of an edentulous mandible rehabilitated [...] Read more.
Background: To compare the loss of preload in absence of loading and after a fixed number of cyclic loadings on 7-mm distal cantilever in two different connection systems using all-on-four prosthetic model. Methods: Two equal models of an edentulous mandible rehabilitated with all-on-four technique with two types of abutment system (MUA and OT-Bridge) supporting a hybrid prosthesis, were used. Initial torque values of the prosthetic fixing screw, after ten minutes from initial screw tightening and after 400,000 repeated loadings were registered using a mechanical torque gauge. Differences between initial and final torque values were reported for each anchoring system and the two systems were finally compared. Results: No statistically significant differences regarding the loss of preload between MUA and OT-Bridge system were found after 400,000 cyclic loadings; however, in MUA system it was found between anterior and posterior implant screws. A significant difference in preload loss was found only for MUA system comparing the initial screw torque to that measured after 10 min from the tightening in absence of cyclic loadings. Conclusions: Within the limits of the present study, MUA and OT-Bridge may be considered reliable prosthetic anchoring systems able to tolerate repeated cyclic occlusal loads on distal cantilever in all-on-four rehabilitation model without any significant loss of preload in screw tightening. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Accuracy of Three Intraoral Scanners in the Oral Environment with and without Saliva: A Comparative Study
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(21), 7762; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10217762 - 02 Nov 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Background: with the emergence of technological innovations in the dental industry, one emerging trend has been the intraoral digitizing of patients by using intraoral scanning systems. Compared to taking conventional impressions, the use of intraoral scanners (IOS) is suitable for capturing direct optical [...] Read more.
Background: with the emergence of technological innovations in the dental industry, one emerging trend has been the intraoral digitizing of patients by using intraoral scanning systems. Compared to taking conventional impressions, the use of intraoral scanners (IOS) is suitable for capturing direct optical impressions, helping to improve diagnostic efficacy, save time, reduce patient discomfort, and simplify clinical procedures. Intraoral scanning systems appear to have a high potential for providing guidance on proper standards of care. However, one main disadvantage is breathing and saliva secretion, which causes deviations, interfering with the applicability and accuracy of the optical impression. The aim of this study was to compare the validity and accuracy of three commercially available intraoral scanners, performing an analysis exploiting a wet model. Methods: an in vitro experimental study of four permanent teeth (two molars and two premolars) on the accuracy of copings obtained by subgingival preparations was performed, using an oral wet environment model. Two hundred and forty digital impressions were produced from three digital scanners using four samples. Descriptive analysis was performed using mean, standard deviation, and median. ANOVA and F-tests were performed to assess the amount of variability between the groups. For statistical analysis a 95% significance level was chosen. Results: all differences between groups were statistically significant. Conclusions: the present data implicate a huge impact of the oral biological fluids on the accuracy of digital impression to corresponding images, implying a failure of accurate impression under wetness conditions. Full article
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