Special Issue "Biomedical Applications of Recombinant Glycoproteins"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Biosciences and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020) | Viewed by 2295

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Rami A. Al-Horani
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA 70125, USA
Interests: thrombosis; hemophilia; drug discovery and design
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recombinant proteins are the products of exogenous DNA translation in living expression systems. Recombinant proteins represent a powerful platform that is extensively exploited in biomedical sciences with significant applications in research, biotechnology, and disease treatment, prevention, and diagnosis. Recombinant proteins are frequently used in molecular and cell biology as well as in structural, biochemical, and biophysical studies. Recombinant proteins are useful tools for studying protein–protein interactions and for performing Western Blot, ELISA, immunohistochemistry, and enzyme assays. They also have meaningful use in food industry, agriculture, and bioengineering. Importantly, recombinant proteins have emerged as life-changing therapies. They include recombinant hormones, interleukins, interferons, tumor necrosis factors, growth factors, thrombolytic drugs, blood clotting factors, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, and enzymes. Thus, many disease conditions benefit from the use of therapeutic recombinant proteins. Interestingly, most of the approved therapeutic proteins in the EU and US markets are recombinant glycoproteins which are recombinant proteins modified by post-translational glycosylation. Glycosylation is highly dependent on the expression system and may eventually dictate the use of the resulting recombinant proteins.

With the advancement of modern technology, the biomedical applications of recombinant proteins in general, and recombinant glycoproteins in particular, will continue to expand. Therefore, in this Special Issue on "Biomedical Applications of Recombinant Glycoproteins", we invite principal investigators who are interested in recombinant glycoproteins to contribute original research articles as well as review articles so to advance our fundamental and technical knowledge relevant to recombinant glycoproteins, with a particular emphasis on their biomedical applications.

Dr. Rami A. Al-Horani
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Recombinant glycoproteins
  • Therapeutic glycoproteins
  • Recombinant hormones
  • Recombinant monoclonal antibodies
  • Vaccines
  • Glycosylation
  • Expression system

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Elevated Levels of Serum IL-17A Secondary to Repeated Intravitreal Injections of Aflibercept in Treatment-Naive Patients with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(12), 4109; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10124109 - 15 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 759
Abstract
We evaluated the effect of three monthly intravitreal injections of aflibercept on the serum concentration of interleukin 17A (IL-17A), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1/CCL2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PlGF) in treatment-naive patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). [...] Read more.
We evaluated the effect of three monthly intravitreal injections of aflibercept on the serum concentration of interleukin 17A (IL-17A), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1/CCL2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placental growth factor (PlGF) in treatment-naive patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). Twenty-two eyes of twenty-two patients with nAMD scheduled for the initial loading phase of intravitreal aflibercept (2 mg/0.05 mL) were included. Serum VEGF, PlGF, MCP-1/CCL2 and IL-17A levels were determined four times in each individual—just before the first injection, 2–3 days after the first injection, just before the third injection, and then 2–3 days after the third aflibercept injection. A statistically significant difference was found between the serum PlGF and IL-17A levels measured before the first injection and after the initial loading phase, with a mean value (MV) of 440.884 vs. 302.151 (p = 0.023) for PlGF and MV = 139.088 pg/mL vs. 151.233 pg/mL (p = 0.016) for IL-17A, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences for VEGF and MCP-1/CCL2 between any of the compared measurements. We reveal that repeated injections of aflibercept promote an increase in serum IL-17A concentration, which may lead to a systemic inflammatory response mediated by IL-17A, but not by MCP-1. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Applications of Recombinant Glycoproteins)
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Article
A Plant-Based Artificial Haemagglutinin (A/H5N1) Strongly Induced Neutralizing Immune Responses in Mice
Appl. Sci. 2019, 9(21), 4605; https://doi.org/10.3390/app9214605 - 29 Oct 2019
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1324
Abstract
Developing new vaccine candidates is considered the best strategy for protecting poultry against artificial haemagglutinin (A/H5N1) strains. The transient expression system in plants has been a very efficient method for rapidly producing haemagglutinin-based recombinant vaccines. In this study, two novel artificial trimeric haemagglutinin [...] Read more.
Developing new vaccine candidates is considered the best strategy for protecting poultry against artificial haemagglutinin (A/H5N1) strains. The transient expression system in plants has been a very efficient method for rapidly producing haemagglutinin-based recombinant vaccines. In this study, two novel artificial trimeric haemagglutinin constructs representing A/H5N1 strains that were detected in poultry from 2005 to 2015 in Vietnam, H5.c1 (representing all of the subclades 1.1, 1.1.1, and 1.1.2) and H5.c2 (representing all of the subclades 2.3.2.1, 2.3.2.1a, 2.3.2.1b, and 2.3.2.1c), were designed for transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana via agroinfiltration. However, only the H5.c1 protein, which showed the best expression and biofunction via the haemagglutination test, was selected for purification by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC). The trimeric structure of the IMAC-purified H5.c1 protein was well characterized by cross-linking reaction and size exclusion chromatography. An indirect ELISA and Western blot analysis of vaccinated mouse sera demonstrated that the H5.c1 protein strongly induced HA-specific Immunoglobulin G (IgG) immune responses. Notably, the H5.c1 protein induced strongly neutralizing antibodies against homologous H5.c1 protein and that of three heterologous native strains of clade, 1, 1.1, and 2.3.2.1c, in haemagglutination inhibition assays. Therefore, the plant-based artificial H5.c1 protein can be a promising vaccine candidate for conferring poultry resistance against A/H5N1 viruses in Vietnam. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomedical Applications of Recombinant Glycoproteins)
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