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Hierarchical Architectures of Micro and Nanoparticles

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanotechnology and Applied Nanosciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 4485

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Institute of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Department of Physical Chemistry and Microreaction Technology, Technische Universität Ilmenau, 98693 Ilmenau, Germany
Interests: microfluidic synthesis of metal nanoparticles; electrical properties of nanoparticles; non-spherical and composite nanoparticles; nanoparticles in sensing and labelling
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the last several decades, a huge number of new nanoparticles and other nanomaterials have been synthesized and investigated. Despite their highly interesting properties and applications, recent developments have a long way to go to reach the vision of complex machineries by self-assembling of nano-scaled building units. However, the controlled interaction and aggregation of particles as well as their connection with biomolecules and synthetic macro- and supramolecules are important tasks towards the realizing of this vision. The fabrication of non-spherical nanoparticles with extraordinary high size and shape homogeneity, surface functionalization and controlled interaction between particles with each other and with molecules, the coupling of different materials, and the designing of nanosystems integrating stiff and movable elements are important challenges. It is expected that in future the border line between material on the one side and functional devices on the other side will disappear. Particles will become equipped with functions and act as partially autonomous devices, on the one hand. Devices will shrink their dimensions down to the nanoscale while retaining their specific functional features and operational autonomy. The construction of hierarchically organized particle assemblies is a crucial step in this direction and will be addressed by the Special Issue here announced.

Prof. Dr. Johann Michael Köhler
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nanoparticles
  • addressed bonding
  • selective interaction
  • hierarchical assembling
  • biometic nanoarchitectures
  • composite nanoparticles
  • functional assemblies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 8968 KiB  
Article
Textured and Hierarchically Constructed Polymer Micro- and Nanoparticles
by Klaus-Peter Kronfeld, Raminta Mazetyte-Stasinskiene, Xuejiao Zheng and Johann Michael Köhler
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(21), 10421; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112110421 - 5 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1591
Abstract
Microfluidic techniques allow for the tailored construction of specific microparticles, which are becoming increasingly interesting and relevant. Here, using a microfluidic hole-plate-device and thermal-initiated free radical polymerization, submicrometer polymer particles with a highly textured surface were synthesized. Two types of monomers were applied: [...] Read more.
Microfluidic techniques allow for the tailored construction of specific microparticles, which are becoming increasingly interesting and relevant. Here, using a microfluidic hole-plate-device and thermal-initiated free radical polymerization, submicrometer polymer particles with a highly textured surface were synthesized. Two types of monomers were applied: (1) methylmethacrylate (MMA) combined with crosslinkers and (2) divinylbenzene (DVB). Surface texture and morphology can be influenced by a series of parameters such as the monomer–crosslinker–solvent composition, surfactants, and additives. Generally, the most structured surfaces with the simultaneously most uniform particles were obtained in the DVB–toluene–nonionic-tensides system. In a second approach, poly-MMA (PMMA) particles were used to build aggregates with bigger polymer particles. For this purpose, tripropyleneglycolediacrylate (TPGDA) particles were synthesized in a microfluidic co-flow arrangement and polymerized by light- irradiation. Then, PMMA particles were assembled at their surface. In a third step, these composites were dispersed in an aqueous acrylamide–methylenebisacrylamide solution, which again was run through a co-flow-device and photopolymerized. As such, entities consisting of particles of three different size ranges—typically 0.7/30/600 µm—were obtained. The particles synthesized by both approaches are potentially suitable for loading with or incorporation of analytic probes or catalysts such as dyes or metals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hierarchical Architectures of Micro and Nanoparticles)
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Review

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12 pages, 1082 KiB  
Review
Tailored Nanoparticles as Vaccine Components
by Alina Popa and Sebastian Springer
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(24), 11898; https://doi.org/10.3390/app112411898 - 14 Dec 2021
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Abstract
Nanoparticles are components of many vaccines, helping to make them more stable and immunogenic. They protect antigens—or the genetic material encoding them—from degradation, target them to particular tissues or cells, promote their uptake into antigen-presenting cells, and activate the immune response (in the [...] Read more.
Nanoparticles are components of many vaccines, helping to make them more stable and immunogenic. They protect antigens—or the genetic material encoding them—from degradation, target them to particular tissues or cells, promote their uptake into antigen-presenting cells, and activate the immune response (in the form of adjuvants). Nanoparticles come in many different kinds, some with uniform composition and some with elaborate core-and-shell structures, including lipid membranes. The antigen is usually retained inside, and the surface can be functionalized by targeting or activating proteins and carbohydrates. This minireview provides a general introductory overview to vaccination and a survey of nanoparticles, their types, production, characteristics, and individual applications in vaccines, and finally, a brief look into the world of artificial antigen-presenting cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hierarchical Architectures of Micro and Nanoparticles)
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