Special Issue "Contaminants in Coastal Environments: From the Sediment-Water Interface to the Trophic Chain"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Sustainable Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 July 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Alessandro Acquavita
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Guest Editor
Regional Agency for the Protection of the Environment of Friuli Venezia Giulia (ARPA FVG), 33057 Palmanova (UD), Italy
Interests: environmental pollution of coastal areas; marine biogeochemistry; mercury; nutrients and trophic state; risk assessment
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Stefano Covelli
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Mathematics and Geosciences, University of Trieste, Via Weiss 2, 34128 Trieste Italy
Interests: Biogeochemistry of trace elements in aquatic environments; biogeochemical cycling of mercury; contaminants in coastal environments
Dr. Efren Garcia-Ordiales
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of Mining Methods and Prospection, University of Oviedo, Calle San Francisco, 3, 33003 Oviedo, Spain
Interests: geochemistry; trace metals; estuarine and marine pollution; Sediment; biota; mercury

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rapid industrialization and urbanization have led to the worsening of environmental quality, especially in coastal environments (i.e., estuaries, lagoons, bays, and harbors), which are subjected to several pressures (i.e., industrial, agricultural, and sewage effluents; shipping; oil spills; river nutrient inputs; and atmospheric depositions). In these environments, sediments represent the final sink and the potential secondary sources, for water column and biota, of several contaminants. Thus, potential toxic elements (PTEs), persistent organic pollutants (POPs), and contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) harm marine life, endanger human health, and often lead to expensive mitigation procedures.

This Special Issue of Applied Sciences is a valuable opportunity to publish recent studies related to the contamination of sediments, water, and biota in coastal environments and to assess the bioavailability, fate, and transport of contaminants. Moreover, the risk assessment and management of these sites will be also considered.

Therefore, this Special Issue will cover the following subjects:

  • Source, fate, and effect of contaminants in sediments of coastal ecosystems.
  • Modeling of sediment source, transport, and storage in coastal ecosystems.
  • Geochemical approaches to bottom sediments to assess anthropogenic changes in coastal environments.
  • Sediment–water interactions and dynamics in coastal environments affected by anthropogenic modifications.
  • Evaluation of the mobility of contaminants from sediments to the water column and biota
  • Solutions to prevent and to mitigate the harmful effects of contaminants on aquatic life.

This Special Issue seeks contributions from all around the world and welcomes high-quality papers that examine, at a local or large scale, the effects, interactions, and management of potential contaminants on the marine environment.

Dr. Alessandro Acquavita
Dr. Stefano Covelli
Dr. Efren Garcia-Ordiales
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sediment contamination
  • contaminants
  • coastal environments
  • water column
  • trophic chain
  • risk assessment
  • management

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Behaviour of Metal(loid)s at the Sediment-Water Interface in an Aquaculture Lagoon Environment (Grado Lagoon, Northern Adriatic Sea, Italy)
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(5), 2350; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11052350 - 06 Mar 2021
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Abstract
The cycling of metal(loid)s at the sediment–water interface (SWI) was evaluated at two selected sites (VN1 and VN3) in an active fish farm in the Grado Lagoon (Northern Adriatic, Italy). In situ experiments using a transparent benthic chamber and the collection of short [...] Read more.
The cycling of metal(loid)s at the sediment–water interface (SWI) was evaluated at two selected sites (VN1 and VN3) in an active fish farm in the Grado Lagoon (Northern Adriatic, Italy). In situ experiments using a transparent benthic chamber and the collection of short sediment cores were performed, to investigate the behavior of metal(loid)s in the solid (sediments) and dissolved (porewaters) phases. Total and labile concentration of metal(loid)s were also determined in sediments, to quantify their potential mobility. Comparable total concentrations were found at both sites, excluding As, Mn, Pb and V, which were higher at VN3. Metal(loid) porewater profiles showed a diagenetic sequence and a close dependence with redox (suboxic/anoxic) conditions in the surface sediments. Positive diffusive fluxes along with benthic fluxes, particularly at the more oxic site, VN1, were found for almost all metal(loid)s, indicating their tendency to migrate towards the overlying water column. Despite sediments at two sites exhibiting high total metal(loid) concentrations and moderate effluxes at the SWI, the results suggest that they are hardly remobilized from the sediments. Recycling of metal(loid)s from the SWI would not constitute a threat for the aquatic trophic chain in the fish farm. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Evaluation of the Anthropogenic Metal Pollution at Osisko Lake: Sediments Characterization for Reclamation Purposes
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(5), 2298; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11052298 - 05 Mar 2021
Viewed by 436
Abstract
The anthropogenic pollution of lake ecosystems by human activities (e.g., mining industries) is recognized as a serious issue. The Osisko urban lake located in Rouyn-Noranda (Quebec, Canada) was used partially as a waste disposal facility for many decades, causing a heavy pollution. The [...] Read more.
The anthropogenic pollution of lake ecosystems by human activities (e.g., mining industries) is recognized as a serious issue. The Osisko urban lake located in Rouyn-Noranda (Quebec, Canada) was used partially as a waste disposal facility for many decades, causing a heavy pollution. The main undertakings of this study are (i) assessing the mineralogical and geochemical properties of lake Osisko sediments, and (ii) studying the pollution that occurred within lake water due to the sediments’ reactivity. Water and sediments across the lake were collected in different sensitive locations. Within the sediment samples, two parts were distinguished: a small layer of black vase over grey sediments. The black vase resembled organic matter while the gray sediment seemed close to clean lake sediments. The collected samples were characterized for their physical (particle size distribution, specific gravity and specific surface area), chemical (minor and major elements as well as total sulfur and carbon) and mineralogical (X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope) properties. Additionally, the reactivity of sediments was studied using weathering cells to quantify chemical species leaching and their releasing rates. The results showed that the vase was the only contaminated part with high concentrations of sulfur and metals such as copper, zinc and iron. Geochemical data showed that the composite sample and the vase potentially cause contaminated acid drainage if they are exposed to atmospheric conditions. Indeed, the pH values of the leachates from both samples were between 4 and 6, while those corresponding to sediments remained around circumneutral values. Quantitatively, the contaminant release from the tested samples was variable. Indeed, the Fe cumulative concentrations were around 200, 80 and 20 mg/kg for the vase, composite and sediment samples, respectively. Similarly, the Zn cumulative concentrations were around 4500, 4200, and below the detection limit for vase, composite and sediment samples, respectively. The same tendency was observed for Cu, S, and Fe. Thus, sediments within Osisko lake present a risk for water contamination if they are resuspended or dredged out of the lake. Consequently, they should be stabilized before their disposal. The samples’ high Cu contents also offer the possibility of their reprocessing. Full article
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