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Toxicity and Nutrition in Marine Shellfish: Novel Analysis and Frontiers

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Science and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 January 2022) | Viewed by 2089

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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Marine shellfish are one of the healthiest foods that can be consumed due to its nutritional profile. They are rich in quality proteins, abundant in omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids, great sources of minerals and vitamins (B1, B2, B3, B12, A, D). However, they are also foods that can easily deteriorate and that may contain toxins that could cause health problems for consumers.

For this reason, we propose in this special issue to study the presence of toxic substances and toxins in marine shellfish, as well as new detection techniques for these substances and the evaluation of the associated risk for consumers due to the consumption of these species.

Prof. Dr. Ángel J. Gutiérrez Fernández
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • heavy metals
  • marine shellfish
  • macroelements and microelements
  • toxic substances and toxin
  • nutrition

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 2503 KiB  
Article
Metallic Study of the Invasive Species Cronius ruber—Assessment of Toxic Risk
by Thabatha Thorne-Bazarra, Enrique Lozano-Bilbao, Raül Triay-Portella, Arturo Hardisson, Soraya Paz, Carmen Rubio-Armendariz, Verónica Martín and Angel J. Gutiérrez
Appl. Sci. 2022, 12(7), 3217; https://doi.org/10.3390/app12073217 - 22 Mar 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1581
Abstract
Three toxic heavy metals (Cd, Pb, and Hg) were analyzed in the newly found invasive species in the Canary Islands, Cronius ruber. Its high growth rate and its widely varied diet are affecting the Canary marine ecosystem. The study was conducted using [...] Read more.
Three toxic heavy metals (Cd, Pb, and Hg) were analyzed in the newly found invasive species in the Canary Islands, Cronius ruber. Its high growth rate and its widely varied diet are affecting the Canary marine ecosystem. The study was conducted using electrothermal vaporization atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) and cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrophotometry (CV-AAS). Significant differences were found in terms of the location and sex of the specimens, with the highest concentrations being found in areas with higher tourism activity and in the female specimens. On the other hand, the conclusion of the study is that human consumption of this species does not pose any toxic risk to public health, as the levels obtained in muscle tissue do not exceed the established limits for these metals. Therefore, its consumption and the fishing of this species can stop the proliferation of the same in the Canary coasts and thus not be harmful for the ecosystem. Full article
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