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Raman Spectroscopy: Novel Advances and Applications: 2nd Edition

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Optics and Lasers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 June 2024) | Viewed by 2843

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Experimental Physics, Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Debrecen, H-4026 Debrecen, Hungary
Interests: nanoparticles; plasmonics; photonics; SERS
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Raman spectroscopy records the spectrum of light inelastically scattered by a medium upon its excitation with monochromatic light and is capable of material characterization through its characteristic vibrations. This nondestructive method can give information on chemical structure and bonding, phase and polymorphism, as well as contamination and impurities of the medium, and even on its intrinsic stress and temperature. Recent developments in Raman instrumentation allow fabricating highly sensitive and selective, yet compact and robust Raman spectrometers. This is accompanied by a rapid advancement in novel Raman techniques, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering, spatially offset Raman spectroscopy, stimulated Raman scattering, etc. This Special Issue of Applied Sciences aims to cover recent advances and novel applications of Raman spectroscopy, including new achievements in the field of Raman instrumentation, methodology, linear and nonlinear processes, and different applications. 

Dr. István Csarnovics
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Raman spectroscopy
  • material characterization
  • vibrational spectroscopy
  • surface-enhanced Raman scattering
  • SERS
  • stimulated Raman scattering
  • SRS
  • CARS
  • Raman instrumentation
  • Raman laser
  • resonant Raman spectroscopy
  • Raman sensing
  • Raman applications
  • biomedical
  • polymer characterization
  • nanostructures
  • semiconductors
  • geology
  • mineralogy
  • life sciences
  • cosmetics
  • pharmacology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 4295 KiB  
Article
Comparative Study on Handheld, Modular, and Laboratory Raman Instruments for the Analysis of Colon Tissues and Colorectal Polyps
by Alla Synytsya, Zuzana Kováčová, Daniela Janstová, Michal Vočka, Jaromír Petrtýl and Luboš Petruželka
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 791; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14020791 - 17 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Portable Raman spectrometers may offer advantages for clinical medical diagnostics over laboratory instruments by allowing for quick measurements in the field and provision of data suitable for screening analyses. This work evaluates the potential of using available handheld, modular, and laboratory Raman spectrometers [...] Read more.
Portable Raman spectrometers may offer advantages for clinical medical diagnostics over laboratory instruments by allowing for quick measurements in the field and provision of data suitable for screening analyses. This work evaluates the potential of using available handheld, modular, and laboratory Raman spectrometers for screening normal colon tissues and benign and malignant colon polyps. The Raman spectra of tissue samples and reference biological macromolecules were measured with these instruments and analyzed using curve fitting and multivariate statistics. The spectra of calf thymus DNA measured with portable devices showed suitable signal-to-noise levels and half-widths of the prominent bands. Band positions, resolution, and relative intensities in the Raman spectra of colon tissues and reference compounds varied for the instruments, and the laboratory device demonstrated the best spectral feature. The principal component analysis (PCA) of the spectra obtained with all Raman devices showed well discrimination of normal colon tissue, adenomatous polyp, and adenocarcinoma. Dendrograms of similarity obtained using hierarchy cluster analysis (HCA) for the Raman spectra of all three devices also showed good separation of these samples. The soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) and support vector machine (SVM) models efficiently classified normal colon tissues and benign/malignant colorectal polyps based on the Raman data from all three devices. Despite its less pronounced spectral characteristics, the handheld Raman spectrometer can be used in early diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma, comparable to the modular and laboratory instruments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Raman Spectroscopy: Novel Advances and Applications: 2nd Edition)
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10 pages, 3694 KiB  
Communication
A Novel Distributed Optical Fiber Temperature Sensor Based on Raman anti-Stokes Scattering Light
by Lidong Lu, Yishan Wang, Ce Liang, Jiaming Fan, Xingchen Su and Minnan Huang
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(20), 11214; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132011214 - 12 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 979
Abstract
In this paper, a novel distributed optical fiber temperature sensor based on Raman anti-Stokes scattering light is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The Raman anti-Stokes scattering light is sensitive to temperature parameters that are detected by the fiber under test conditions (FUT), and this [...] Read more.
In this paper, a novel distributed optical fiber temperature sensor based on Raman anti-Stokes scattering light is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The Raman anti-Stokes scattering light is sensitive to temperature parameters that are detected by the fiber under test conditions (FUT), and this allowed the temperature demodulation algorithm to be obtained through the relationship between the temperature and the power of the back-scattered Raman anti-Stokes light. In addition, we propose a new temperature calibration method to ensure accurate temperature measurement, which is greatly affected by the stability of a pulse laser. The experimental system is constructed with an optical fiber length of approximately 3.5 km. The proposed system obtains a 24 dB dynamic range with a pulse width of 20 ns and temperature testing ranges of 30.0 °C to 80.0 °C. The results demonstrate that the maximum temperature deviation range is −1.5 °C to +1.6 °C and the root mean square (RMS) error of the whole temperature range is 0.3 °C, which means it has the potential for practical engineering applications. More importantly, it avoids the walk-off effect that must be corrected in commonly used temperature demodulation schemes adopting both Raman Stokes light and anti-Stokes light. It also saves a signal channel, which is more suitable for the integration of hybrid distributed optical fiber sensing systems for multi-parameter monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Raman Spectroscopy: Novel Advances and Applications: 2nd Edition)
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Review

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16 pages, 2394 KiB  
Review
Applications of Raman Microscopy/Spectroscopy-Based Techniques to Plant Disease Diagnosis
by Ioannis Vagelas, Ioannis Manthos and Thomas Sotiropoulos
Appl. Sci. 2024, 14(13), 5926; https://doi.org/10.3390/app14135926 - 7 Jul 2024
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Abstract
Plant diseases pose a significant threat to plant and crop health, leading to reduced yields and economic losses. The traditional methods for diagnosing plant diseases are often invasive and time-consuming and may not always provide accurate results. In recent years, there has been [...] Read more.
Plant diseases pose a significant threat to plant and crop health, leading to reduced yields and economic losses. The traditional methods for diagnosing plant diseases are often invasive and time-consuming and may not always provide accurate results. In recent years, there has been growing interest in utilizing Raman microscopy as a non-invasive and label-free technique for plant disease diagnosis. Raman microscopy is a powerful analytical tool that can provide detailed molecular information about samples by analyzing the scattered light from a laser beam. This technique has the potential to revolutionize plant disease diagnosis by offering rapid and accurate detection of various plant pathogens, including bacteria and fungi. One of the key advantages of Raman microscopy/spectroscopy is its ability to provide real-time and in situ analyses of plant samples. By analyzing the unique spectral fingerprints of different pathogens, researchers can quickly identify the presence of specific diseases without the need for complex sample preparation or invasive procedures. This article discusses the development of a Raman microspectroscopy system for disease diagnosis that can accurately detect and identify various plant pathogens, such as bacteria and fungi. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Raman Spectroscopy: Novel Advances and Applications: 2nd Edition)
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