Latest Research on Electronic Noise

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 August 2024 | Viewed by 2224

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Electronic noise has often been considered a problem, and is seen as a disturbance to be eliminated or, at least, reduced as much as possible.However, having its origins in the interaction between matter and charged particles and carrying information about the phenomena that occur at the microscopic level, it can give useful information on the structure of the device under test (DUT) or on its working mechanisms. In this sense, therefore, measuring noise is a powerful device and material characterization technique. This Special Issue aims to collect works that address noise from different points of view: as a knowledge tool or as an issue to be controlled and reduced. Physical interpretations, models, applications, dedicated instrumentation, and measurements are among the topics that we intend to explore.

Dr. Graziella Scandurra
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • sensors’ characterization and reliability
  • noise characterization
  • electronic noise
  • noise in cryptography
  • low noise instrumentation
  • signal processing
  • measuring noise

Published Papers (2 papers)

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12 pages, 3254 KiB  
Article
Research on an Ultraviolet Spectral Denoising Algorithm Based on the Improved SVD Method
by Zhaoyu Qin, Zhaofan Wang and Ruxing Wang
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(22), 12301; https://doi.org/10.3390/app132212301 - 14 Nov 2023
Viewed by 640
Abstract
The utilization of ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy for monitoring the concentration of specific decomposition gas components in gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) can provide a means to assess its insulation status. Nevertheless, UV optical modules currently deployed in the field are susceptible to external interferences [...] Read more.
The utilization of ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy for monitoring the concentration of specific decomposition gas components in gas-insulated switchgear (GIS) can provide a means to assess its insulation status. Nevertheless, UV optical modules currently deployed in the field are susceptible to external interferences like ambient noise and equipment vibrations. Real-time spectral data acquisition often suffers from significant noise contamination, directly impinging on subsequent feature extraction and detection accuracy. This paper presents an optimized singular value decomposition (SVD) noise reduction method for mitigating noisy spectral signals. First, each singular value within the noisy signal is transformed into a component signal. Next, the highest frequency value in the signal serves as an indicator to characterize the signal. Finally, the primary frequency values are arranged based on the decreasing singular values of the original noisy signal. The singular value corresponding to the first primary frequency value surpassing a preset threshold is selected as the effective order for denoising. Random noise with varying intensities was intentionally introduced to the UV spectral signal of sulfur dioxide (SO2), followed by noise reduction procedures. It is shown that the improved SVD noise reduction algorithm proposed in this paper enhances the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by 18.02% and 16.86%, and reduces the root-mean-square error (RMSE) by 15.13% and 14.92%, respectively, compared with the singular value difference spectrum (SVDS) denoising method and wavelet transform denoising method under the condition of low SNR. Furthermore, there exists a linear relationship between the concentration of SO2 samples and the eigenvalues of the UV spectra, demonstrating a higher linear goodness with a coefficient of 0.99735. The denoising method proposed in this paper does not require the manual setting of various types of parameters, and has a better ability to deal with the noise of UV spectral signals in engineering sites with complex environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Research on Electronic Noise)
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16 pages, 3175 KiB  
Article
Transimpedance Amplifier for Noise Measurements in Low-Resistance IR Photodetectors
by Krzysztof Achtenberg, Graziella Scandurra, Janusz Mikołajczyk, Carmine Ciofi and Zbigniew Bielecki
Appl. Sci. 2023, 13(17), 9964; https://doi.org/10.3390/app13179964 - 04 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1314
Abstract
This paper presents the design and testing of an ultra-low-noise transimpedance amplifier (TIA) for low-frequency noise measurements on low-impedance (below 1 kΩ) devices, such as advanced IR photodetectors. When dealing with low-impedance devices, the main source of background noise in transimpedance amplifiers comes [...] Read more.
This paper presents the design and testing of an ultra-low-noise transimpedance amplifier (TIA) for low-frequency noise measurements on low-impedance (below 1 kΩ) devices, such as advanced IR photodetectors. When dealing with low-impedance devices, the main source of background noise in transimpedance amplifiers comes from the equivalent input voltage noise of the operational amplifier, which is used in a shunt–shunt configuration to obtain a transimpedance stage. In our design, we employ a hybrid operational amplifier in which an input front end based on ultra-low-noise discrete JFET devices is used to minimize this noise contribution. When using IF3602 JFETs for the input stage, the equivalent voltage noise of the hybrid operational amplifier can be as low as 4 nV/√Hz, 2 nV/√Hz, and 0.9 nV/√Hz at 1 Hz, 10 Hz, and 1 kHz, respectively. When testing the current noise of an ideal 1 kΩ resistor, these values correspond to a current noise contribution of the same order as or below that of the thermal noise of the resistor. Therefore, in cases in which the current flicker noise is dominant, i.e., much higher than the thermal noise, the noise contribution from the transimpedance amplifier can be neglected in most cases of interest. Test measurements on advanced low-impedance photodetectors are also reported to demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed approach for directly measuring low-frequency current noise in biased low-impedance electronic devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Research on Electronic Noise)
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