Special Issue "Phage Therapy: A biological Approach to Treatment of Bacterial Infections"

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Bacteriophages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Saija Johanna Kiljunen
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
Interests: antibiotic resistance; bacteriophage; phage therapy; phage genomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to prolonged use, underuse, or misuse of antibiotics presents a global challenge in terms of increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. One promising alternative to treat infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria is phage therapy, where the natural predators of bacteria (bacteriophages, phages) are used to kill the pathogens. Phage therapy has a 100-year history, but it was forgotten in the Western countries after the invention of antibiotics. Now renewed interest in phage therapy is emerging and new practices for this biological treatment of bacterial infections are being developed.

This Special Issue "Phage Therapy: A biological Approach to Treatment of Bacterial Infections" covers different aspects of phage therapy. The issue welcomes various submission types, including original research papers, short communications, reviews, case reports, and perspectives. Potential topics for this special issue include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Treatment of human infections
  • Treatment of animal infections
  • Good practices in phage therapy
  • Safety of phage therapy
  • Phage pharmacokinetics
  • Phages in biofilm control and prevention
  • Phage resistance

Dr. Saija Johanna Kiljunen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bacteriophages
  • Phage therapy
  • Human infections
  • Animal infections
  • Pharmacokinetics
  • Biofilm control
  • Phage resistance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Fate of Bacteriophages in Recirculating Aquaculture Systems (RAS)—Towards Developing Phage Therapy for RAS
Antibiotics 2019, 8(4), 192; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics8040192 - 24 Oct 2019
Abstract
Aquaculture production has increased tremendously during the last decades, and new techniques have been developed, e.g., recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). In RAS, the majority of water volume is circulated via mechanical and biological filters and reused in the tanks. However, the prevention and [...] Read more.
Aquaculture production has increased tremendously during the last decades, and new techniques have been developed, e.g., recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). In RAS, the majority of water volume is circulated via mechanical and biological filters and reused in the tanks. However, the prevention and treatment of diseases in these systems are challenging, as the pathogens spread throughout the system, and the addition of chemicals and antibiotics disrupts the microbiome of the biofilters. The increasing antibiotic resistance has made phage therapy a relevant alternative for antibiotics in food production. Indeed, as host-specific and self-replicating agent they might be optimal for targeted pathogen eradication in RAS. We tested the survival and spread of Flavobacterium columnare -infecting phage FCL-2 in recirculating aquaculture fish farm with rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in a fully controlled study. After a single addition, phage persisted in water samples collected from tank, fixed bed, moving bed, and aeration unit up to 14 days, and in the water of rearing tanks, rainbow trout mucus, and bioreactor carrier media from the fixed and moving bed biofilters for 21 days. Furthermore, phage adsorbed preferentially to moving bed carrier media, which contained biofilm attached and from which higher phage numbers were recovered. This study shows phages as a potent strategy for maintaining biosecurity in RAS systems. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Phage-Antibiotic Combination Treatments: Antagonistic Impacts of Antibiotics on the Pharmacodynamics of Phage Therapy?
Antibiotics 2019, 8(4), 182; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics8040182 - 11 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Bacteria can evolve resistance to antibiotics. Even without changing genetically, bacteria also can display tolerance to antibiotic treatments. Many antibiotics are also broadly acting, as can result in excessive modifications of body microbiomes. Particularly for antibiotics of last resort or in treating extremely [...] Read more.
Bacteria can evolve resistance to antibiotics. Even without changing genetically, bacteria also can display tolerance to antibiotic treatments. Many antibiotics are also broadly acting, as can result in excessive modifications of body microbiomes. Particularly for antibiotics of last resort or in treating extremely ill patients, antibiotics furthermore can display excessive toxicities. Antibiotics nevertheless remain the standard of care for bacterial infections, and rightly so given their long track records of both antibacterial efficacy and infrequency of severe side effects. Antibiotics do not successfully cure all treated bacterial infections, however, thereby providing a utility to alternative antibacterial approaches. One such approach is the use of bacteriophages, the viruses of bacteria. This nearly 100-year-old bactericidal, anti-infection technology can be effective against antibiotic-resistant or -tolerant bacteria, including bacterial biofilms and persister cells. Ideally phages could be used in combination with standard antibiotics while retaining their anti-bacterial pharmacodynamic activity, this despite antibiotics interfering with aspects of bacterial metabolism that are also required for full phage infection activity. Here I examine the literature of pre-clinical phage-antibiotic combination treatments, with emphasis on antibiotic-susceptible bacterial targets. I review evidence of antibiotic interference with phage infection activity along with its converse: phage antibacterial functioning despite antibiotic presence. Full article
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