Antibiotic Resistance: A One-Health Approach, 2nd Edition

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Antibiotics Use and Antimicrobial Stewardship".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 July 2024 | Viewed by 6545

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences - One Health Unit, University of Milan, 20133 Milan, Italy
Interests: antibiotic resistance; one health; bacterial infections; alternative to antibiotics; laboratory animals; infectious diseases
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This is the second edition of the Special Issue "Antibiotic Resistance: A One-Health Approach".

Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide problem that involves humans, animals and environmental health. Therefore, the One Health approach embraces all these "players" and allows scientists to work in a synergic multidisciplinary way for controlling the antimicrobial resistance phenomenon. This second edition aims to collect original research, review articles and opinion papers on the different approaches to studying the distribution of antibiotic resistance genes (i.e., development of new diagnostic tools or application of NGS techniques) and controlling the spread of antibiotic resistance (i.e., application/discovery of alternative antimicrobial molecules) in the human–animal–environment interface.

Dr. Piera Anna Martino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antibiotic-resistance
  • One Health
  • virulence factors
  • genomics
  • novel natural molecules
  • antimicrobial stewardship

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 617 KiB  
Article
Resistance to Critical Important Antibacterials in Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Strains of Veterinary Origin
by Alessandro Bellato, Patrizia Robino, Maria Cristina Stella, Laura Scarrone, Daniela Scalas and Patrizia Nebbia
Antibiotics 2022, 11(12), 1758; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11121758 - 5 Dec 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1422
Abstract
Staphylococcal infections represent a challenge in companion animals and hospitalized patients. This study aimed to assess the resistance of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates, against a broad panel of antibacterials, including exclusive to human medicine. A total of 40 S. pseudintermedius were collected from clinical [...] Read more.
Staphylococcal infections represent a challenge in companion animals and hospitalized patients. This study aimed to assess the resistance of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates, against a broad panel of antibacterials, including exclusive to human medicine. A total of 40 S. pseudintermedius were collected from clinical specimens of dogs (n = 31) and cats (n = 5). All strains were tested for 20 antibacterials, namely 14 Critical Important and eight Highly Important Antibacterials (CIA and HIA, respectively), indicative for 18 antimicrobial classes. All strains were susceptible to seven antibiotics (daptomycin, fosfomycin, fusidic acid, linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin, teicoplanin/vancomycin, tigecycline). The highest resistance was against penicillin (97.5% Confidence Interval [CI]: 83.8–100.0), whereas the lowest against telavancin (2.5%, CI: 0.0–16.2). Resistance versus Highest Priority CIA was observed, namely against macrolides (70.0, CI: 52.1–84.3), quinolones (62.5, CI: 44.5–78.3), 5th generation cephalosporins (7.5, CI: 1.3–21.6), and glycopeptides (2.5%, CI: 0.0–14.2). Among High Priority CIA, strains were resistant only to aminoglycosides (65.0, CI: 47.0–80.4) and ansamycins (12.5, CI: 3.8–28.1). We observed the highest resistance against veterinary medicine antibacterials, but there was also resistance against antibacterials exclusive to human medicine, namely ceftaroline (7.5, CI: 1.0–23.8) and telavancin. S. pseudintermedius zoonotic potential and its rate of acquisition of new resistance should encourage surveillance on a broad spectrum of antibacterials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibiotic Resistance: A One-Health Approach, 2nd Edition)
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17 pages, 635 KiB  
Article
Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Community Pharmacy Professionals on Poultry Antibiotic Dispensing, Use, and Bacterial Antimicrobial Resistance in Zambia: Implications on Antibiotic Stewardship and WHO AWaRe Classification of Antibiotics
by Steward Mudenda, Moses Mukosha, Brian Godman, Joseph Fadare, Sydney Malama, Musso Munyeme, Christabel Nang’andu Hikaambo, Aubrey Chichonyi Kalungia, Audrey Hamachila, Henson Kainga, Flavien Nsoni Bumbangi, Victor Daka, Ruth Lindizyani Mfune, Geoffrey Mainda, Webrod Mufwambi, Prudence Mpundu, Maisa Kasanga, Shereen Ahmed Mohammed Saad and John Bwalya Muma
Antibiotics 2022, 11(9), 1210; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11091210 - 7 Sep 2022
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 4468
Abstract
Globally, the inappropriate dispensing and use of antibiotics in animals has contributed to the development of bacterial antimicrobial resistance (AMR). In Zambia, there is insufficient information among community pharmacy professionals on antibiotic use (ABU) and AMR in food-producing animals. This study assessed community [...] Read more.
Globally, the inappropriate dispensing and use of antibiotics in animals has contributed to the development of bacterial antimicrobial resistance (AMR). In Zambia, there is insufficient information among community pharmacy professionals on antibiotic use (ABU) and AMR in food-producing animals. This study assessed community pharmacy professionals’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding poultry antibiotic dispensing, use, and bacterial AMR in the Lusaka district of Zambia. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 178 community pharmacy professionals between February and April 2022 using a semi-structured questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Stata version 17. Of the total participants (n = 178), 51.1% (n = 91) were pharmacists. The most dispensed antibiotic was oxytetracycline, a Watch antibiotic, mainly without prescriptions. Good knowledge of ABU and AMR was associated with work experience for more than one year (p = 0.016), while good practices were associated with male gender (p = 0.039) and work experience of more than one year (p = 0.011). The study found moderate knowledge, positive attitudes, and moderate practices of pharmacy professionals on poultry ABU and AMR. There was high dispensing of poultry antibiotics without prescriptions, which calls for strict implementation of antimicrobial stewardship and surveillance programs in poultry production in Zambia to reduce AMR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Antibiotic Resistance: A One-Health Approach, 2nd Edition)
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