Rapid Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing: A Key for Managing Antimicrobial Resistance

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 2817

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Medical and Molecular Microbiology, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland
2. Food Hygiene and Control, Faculty of Veterinary Medicne, South Valley University, Qena, Egypt
Interests: antibiotic resistance; one health; rapid diagnostics; susceptibility testing; gram negatives; genomics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Clinical Unit of Infectious Diseases, Microbiology and Parasitology, Virgen del Rocío University Hospital, Seville, Spain
2. Institute of Biomedicine of Seville (IBiS), Virgen del Rocío University Hospital/CSIC/University of Seville, Seville, Spain
Interests: multidrug resistance; clinical pathogens; antimicrobial susceptibility testing; gram negatives; genomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Choice of therapeutics for treating multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR)-associated infections is mainly based on the result of susceptibility testing performed using different techniques. The delayed detection of resistance results in delayed administration of efficient antibiotic therapy, clinical treatment failure, or hinders the isolation of MDR carriers, thereby promoting outbreaks. Therefore, the development of rapid, easy-to-perform, cost-effective and accurate diagnostics of MDR bacteria in infected or colonized patients is a matter of high priority in clinical microbiology, as it has the potential to improve patient management, limit the dissemination of MDR isolates, and assist in clinical decision-making.

In this Special Issue, we aim to highlight the current state of art in rapid diagnostics for antimicrobial resistance, alternatives to traditional AST methods as well as recent advancements in new diagnostics systems. We invite authors to submit articles focused on topics including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Modified and new phenotypic techniques to detect antimicrobial resistant pathogens;
  • Genotypic techniques for the rapid diagnosis of AMR;
  • Novel rapid diagnostic tests for AMR;
  • Novel biomarkers to detect AMR pathogens;
  • Evaluation of novel diagnostic methods;
  • Evaluation of commercially available rapid diagnostics for AMR.

Dr. Mustafa Sadek
Dr. José Manuel Ortiz De La Rosa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Antibiotics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • multidrug-resistant bacteria
  • rapid diagnostics
  • susceptibility testing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1179 KiB  
Article
Rapid Phenotypic Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiling of Clinical Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Blood Cultures
by Idan Hefetz, Rita Bardenstein, Shahar Rotem, Galia Zaide, Gal Bilinsky, Ohad Shifman, Oren Zimhony and Ronit Aloni-Grinstein
Antibiotics 2024, 13(3), 231; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics13030231 - 29 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Bloodstream infections (BSI) are defined by the presence of viable bacteria or fungi, accompanied by systemic signs of infection. Choosing empirical therapy based solely on patient risk factors and prior antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) may lead to either ineffective treatment or unnecessarily broad-spectrum [...] Read more.
Bloodstream infections (BSI) are defined by the presence of viable bacteria or fungi, accompanied by systemic signs of infection. Choosing empirical therapy based solely on patient risk factors and prior antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) may lead to either ineffective treatment or unnecessarily broad-spectrum antibiotic exposure. In general, Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute guideline-approved ASTs have a turnaround time of 48–72 h from sample to answer, a period that may result in a critical delay in the appropriate selection of therapy. Therefore, reducing the time required for AST is highly advantageous. We have previously shown that our novel rapid AST method, MAPt (Micro-Agar-PCR-test), accurately identifies susceptibility profiles for spiked bioterrorism agents like Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis and Francisella tularensis directly from whole-blood and blood culture samples, even at low bacterial levels (500 CFU/mL). This study evaluated the performance of MAPt on routine bloodstream infection (BSI), focusing on Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from clinical cultures, including resistant strains to some of the six tested antibiotics. Notably, MAPt yielded results exceeding 95% agreement with the standard hospital method within a significantly shorter timeframe of 6 h. These findings suggest significant potential for MAPt as a rapid and reliable BSI management tool. Full article
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9 pages, 559 KiB  
Article
BIChromET: A Chromogenic Culture Medium for Detection of Piperacillin/Tazobactam and Cefepime Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa
by José Manuel Ortiz de la Rosa, Ángel Rodríguez-Villodres, Guillermo Martín-Gutiérrez, Carmen Cintora Mairal, José Luis García Escobar, Lydia Gálvez-Benítez, José Miguel Cisneros and José Antonio Lepe
Antibiotics 2023, 12(11), 1573; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics12111573 - 28 Oct 2023
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Abstract
Objectives: The BIChromET selective medium for detecting piperacillin-tazobactam (TZP) and cefepime (FEP) resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa was developed. Methods: The performance of this medium was first evaluated using a collection of 100 P. aeruginosa clinical strains (70 TZP-susceptible, 30 TZP-resistant, 58 FEP-susceptible, and 42 [...] Read more.
Objectives: The BIChromET selective medium for detecting piperacillin-tazobactam (TZP) and cefepime (FEP) resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa was developed. Methods: The performance of this medium was first evaluated using a collection of 100 P. aeruginosa clinical strains (70 TZP-susceptible, 30 TZP-resistant, 58 FEP-susceptible, and 42 FEP-resistant). Then, we performed clinical validation by testing 173 respiratory clinical samples. Results: The BIChromET medium showed excellent sensitivity (TZP (avg. 96.7%); FEP (avg. 92.7%)) and specificity (TZP (avg. 98.9%); FEP (avg. 98%)) in distinguishing the detection limit ranging from 104 to 108 CFU/mL. Then, testing the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and tracheobronchial aspirate (TBA) clinical specimens (N = 173) revealed the excellent performance of the medium with P. aeruginosa, showing 100% and 92.6% of categorical agreements with the results obtained via the broth microdilution methods (BMD) for TZP and FEP, respectively. Conclusion: This medium allows for easy and accurate detection of TZP/FEP-resistant isolates regardless of their resistance mechanisms. Full article
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