Special Issue "Reproduction of Small Animals: Physiology, Pathology and Performance"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Companion Animals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Fiona K. Hollinshead
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
Interests: breeding; small animals; in vivo/in vitro fertilization; reproduction
Dr. Greg Burns
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA
Interests: breeding; small animals; transcervical insemination; reproduction
Dr. Natali Krekeler
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Biosciences, University of Melbourne, 3010 Melbourne, Australia
Interests: animal reproduction; canine pyometra; small animals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the late 1970’s fundamental research of the unique reproductive physiology of the bitch brought about a greater understanding of the LH surge and ovulation which has led to the accurate timing of insemination and breeding today. Additional unique features of the reproductive physiology of the bitch such as the absence of a luteolytic mechanism has enabled greater understanding of the pregnant and non-pregnant state in the bitch as well as a greater understanding of reproductive pathologies such as pyometra.

Developments in novel pharmacological drugs and devices for both treatment and prevention of many reproductive diseases and management of clinical presentations in our small animal species have evolved from these fundamental early studies in female reproductive physiology. A greater understanding of both feline and canine reproductive physiology has also paved the way for many non- surgical, contraceptive solutions but effective management of endemic stray small animal populations on a worldwide scale is yet to be achieved.

Many factors can potentially influence reproductive performance in small animals after breeding or artificial insemination. Advances in semen evaluation, handling, chilled shipment and cryopreservation  along with technological developments in AI with the development of non- invasive endoscopes for transcervical insemination in both queens and bitches has allowed greater reproductive performance as measured by pregnancy rate and litter size as well as enhanced genetic gain through increased use of frozen semen.

Despite advancements that have been made in AI and breeding in canids and unlike in the felid species, progression of artificial reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization, blastocyst production, genetic manipulation of embryos and production of both normal and genetically modified offspring is still with limitations. It is hoped that with the development of novel technology such as gene editing, isolation and characterization of extracellular vesicles and development of 3D organoid culture systems these limitations in the canine species will be overcome in the near future. A greater understanding of both feline and canine reproductive physiology has paved the way for many non- surgical, genetic modifying, pharmacological contraceptive options but management of large shelter/stray small animal populations all over the world is still not solved.

The aim of this Special Edition is to present recent research and reviews on the unique reproductive physiology features of our small animal species. It will highlight the implications these features have on the development of management, treatment and prevention of reproductive pathology and how they can be utilized to further enhance or prevent reproductive performance. The aim of this special edition is to gain knowledge in small animal anatomical and endocrinological reproductive physiology and stimulate interest in the evolving technologies that will further enhance this exciting field of research.

Dr. Fiona K. Hollinshead
Dr. Greg Burns
Dr. Natali Krekeler
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Artificial insemination
  • Contraception
  • Litter size
  • Pregnancy
  • Transcervical insemination
  • In vitro fertilization
  • Ovulation
  • LH surge

Published Papers

This special issue is now open for submission.
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