Special Issue "Innovations in Livestock Farms"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal System and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Maria Caria
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Science, University of Sassari, Viale Italia 39, 07100 Sassari, Italy
Interests: precision livestock farming; animal welfare; milking management; milking systems; wearable technologies; mechanization of livestock farms; ergonomic and safety issues; energy and environmental sustainability of dairy farms; smart glasses for augmented reality; logistics of milk collection
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Giuseppe Todde
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Science, University of Sassari, Viale Italia 39, 07100 Sassari, Italy
Interests: energy and environmental impact of dairy farms; environmental sustainability of agricultural systems: energy and environmental performance of photovoltaic irrigation systems; precision livestock farming; wearable technologies; mechanization of livestock farms; smart glasses for augmented reality; logistics of milk collection; life cycle assessment; direct and indirect energy analysis of livestock farms
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, the livestock industry has managed production according to high quantitative and qualitative criteria, placing modern livestock farming within a highly competitive national and international supply chain. Nevertheless, animal husbandry has been exposed to a wide variation in profit levels due to considerable variability in product price and energy and feed costs. For these reasons, it is necessary that the livestock industry improve competitiveness by adopting innovative production processes and improving animal welfare. Development and miniaturization of sensors along with continuing costs reduction encourage the implementation of new technologies in livestock farms, allowing increases in their efficiency and productiveness. However, to design and use new management systems towards an improvement of the livestock sector, more knowledge is needed about the relationships among animal wellbeing, productions, technology, and large data sets.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide innovative experimental research, models, and tools focusing on new livestock farming technologies, including the related economic and environmental impacts. This Special Issue may include but is not limited to:

  • Innovative technologies for animal husbandry;
  • Performances of new technologies in livestock farming;
  • Animal monitoring systems;
  • Influence of sensors and automatisms on animal performances and wellbeing;
  • Sustainable livestock farming systems;
  • Augmented reality applications.
Prof. Maria Caria
Dr. Giuseppe Todde
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • smart farming
  • animal welfare
  • wearable technologies
  • farm management
  • sensors
  • automation in animal farming

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Remotely Sensed Imagery for Early Detection of Respiratory Disease in Pigs: A Pilot Study
Animals 2020, 10(3), 451; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10030451 - 09 Mar 2020
Abstract
Respiratory diseases are a major problem in the pig industry worldwide. Due to the impact of these diseases, the early identification of infected herds is essential. Computer vision technology, using RGB (red, green and blue) and thermal infrared imagery, can assist the early [...] Read more.
Respiratory diseases are a major problem in the pig industry worldwide. Due to the impact of these diseases, the early identification of infected herds is essential. Computer vision technology, using RGB (red, green and blue) and thermal infrared imagery, can assist the early detection of changes in animal physiology related to these and other diseases. This pilot study aimed to identify whether these techniques are a useful tool to detect early changes of eye and ear-base temperature, heart rate and respiration rate in pigs that were challenged with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Clinical observations and imagery were analysed, comparing data obtained from animals that showed some signs of illness with data from animals that showed no signs of ill health. Highly significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed between sick and healthy pigs in heart rate, eye and ear temperature, with higher heart rate and higher temperatures in sick pigs. The largest change in temperature and heart rate remotely measured was observed around 4–6 h before signs of clinical illness were observed by the skilled technicians. These data suggest that computer vision techniques could be a useful tool to detect indicators of disease before the symptoms can be observed by stock people, assisting the early detection and control of respiratory diseases in pigs, promoting further research to study the capability and possible uses of this technology for on farm monitoring and management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovations in Livestock Farms)
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