Saliva and Blood Markers in Animal Welfare and Health Monitoring

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Veterinary Clinical Studies".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 June 2024 | Viewed by 1103

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Interdisciplinary Laboratory of Clinical Analysis of the University of Murcia (Interlab-UMU), Department of Animal Medicine & Surgery, Veterinary School, Campus Mare Nostrum, University of Murcia, 30100 Murcia, Spain
Interests: biomarkers of health; behavioural experiment; salivary biomarkers; stress; animal welfare; behaviour; horse
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Guest Editor
Medicine Animal, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of Cáceres, University of Extremadura, Avenida de la Universidad S-N, 10002 Cáceres, Spain
Interests: horses; internal medicine; blood; hemostasis; hematology; biochemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of saliva as a biological fluid for determining animal welfare and health status by identifying and quantifying biomarkers has achieved significant interest in the last few decades, since it allows sampling according to the welfare standards to be carried out by minimally invasive procedures, unlike blood. Therefore, this biological fluid is very useful for monitoring disease processes and evaluating stressful status or positive situations over time. Nonetheless, there are different patterns of change in some biomarkers if assessed in saliva or blood and, indeed, biomarkers that could be evaluated differently in blood or saliva. Thus, saliva and blood biomarkers measuring can provide invaluable complementary information.

We are pleased to invite you to submit original studies to this new Special Issue of Animals, which aims to increase the knowledge in animal welfare science by investigating biomarkers in saliva and/or blood that could monitor disease conditions, stressful or positive situations, physical efforts, or any interaction that evaluates any welfare status in animals (veterinarian, zoological or wildlife species).

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following: internal medicine, neurophysiology, animal behavioural sciences or animal sport science.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. María Dolores Contreras-Aguilar
Dr. Maria Martín-Cuervo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomarkers
  • saliva
  • serum
  • blood
  • health status
  • welfare
  • stress

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 994 KiB  
Article
Association between Eosinophil Count and Cortisol Concentrations in Equids Admitted in the Emergency Unit with Abdominal Pain
by María Villalba-Orero, María Dolores Contreras-Aguilar, Jose Joaquín Cerón, Beatriz Fuentes-Romero, Marta Valero-González and María Martín-Cuervo
Animals 2024, 14(1), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14010164 - 04 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Stress leukogram includes eosinopenia as one of its main markers (neutrophilia, eosinopenia, lymphopenia, and mild monocytosis). Cortisol is the main stress biomarker, which is also strongly correlated with the severity of gastrointestinal diseases. This study aimed to determine the relationship between salivary cortisol [...] Read more.
Stress leukogram includes eosinopenia as one of its main markers (neutrophilia, eosinopenia, lymphopenia, and mild monocytosis). Cortisol is the main stress biomarker, which is also strongly correlated with the severity of gastrointestinal diseases. This study aimed to determine the relationship between salivary cortisol and the eosinophil cell count (EC) in equids with abdominal pain. To do this, 39 horses with abdominal pain referred to an emergency service were included. All samples were taken on admission, and several parameters and clinical data were included. Equids were classified according to the outcome as survivors and non-survivors. Non-surviving equids presented higher salivary cortisol concentrations (Non-Survivors: 1.580 ± 0.816 µg/dL; Survivors 0.988 ± 0.653 µg/dL; p < 0.05) and lower EC (Non-Survivors: 0.0000 × 103/µL (0.000/0.0075); Survivors: 0.0450 × 103/µL (0.010/0.1825); p < 0.01). In addition, the relationship between salivary cortisol concentration, EC, and the WBC was determined. Only a strong correlation (negative) was observed between cortisol and EC (r = −0.523, p < 0.01). Since cortisol is not an analyte that can be measured routinely in clinical settings such as emergencies, the EC could be a good alternative. While the results are promising, further studies are needed before EC can be used confidently in routine practice to predict survival in cases of abdominal pain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Saliva and Blood Markers in Animal Welfare and Health Monitoring)
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