Special Issue "Quality of Products from Ruminants in Extensive Production Systems"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Antonino Di Grigoli
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Dipartimento Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari e Forestali, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze 4, 90128 Palermo, Italy
Interests: animal production; animal feeding and nutrition; animal behavior; milk and cheese quality; meat quality; ruminants
Prof. Adriana Bonanno
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Dipartimento Scienze Agrarie, Alimentari e Forestali, Università degli Studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo, Italy
Interests: animal nutrition and feeding; by-products in ruminant feeding; ruminant grazing systems; dairy production; ruminant meat quality

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In hills and mountains areas, the ruminants farming system is often the result of interactions among environment, animal breed, and grazing management. As is known, the farming system strongly influences the welfare status of animals, as well as their production. Specifically, extensive production systems where animals, often of autochthonous breeds, are fed with pasture-based diets, show positive impacts on animals behaviour and health, and confer special properties to animal products, with particular regard to fatty acid profile, antioxidant compounds, and sensory traits. Thus, the animal products from extensive systems acquire those attributes that are appreciated by a growing number of consumers who require healthy and tasty foods produced with low environmental impact, and ensuring animals’ welfare. Furthermore, extensive production systems, involving local breeds, contribute to safeguard animal biodiversity, preserve artisanal techniques for milk and meat processing, and enhance the presence of typical products in the market.

Original manuscripts taking into account aspects of extensive farming systems, managed also using organic production methods, that could influence any quality traits of typical products from ruminant species, are invited for this Special Issue. Moreover, contributions on animals welfare and health, as well as on environmental and economic sustainability, are welcome.

Prof. Antonino Di Grigoli
Dr. Adriana Bonanno
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • autochthonous breed
  • organic livestock
  • environmental impact
  • sustainability
  • behaviour
  • animal welfare
  • typical products
  • fatty acid composition
  • polyphenols
  • antioxidant compounds
  • functional foods

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Discrimination of Meat Produced by Bos taurus and Bos indicus Finished under an Intensive or Extensive System
Animals 2020, 10(10), 1737; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10101737 - 24 Sep 2020
Abstract
Meat obtained under commercial conditions shows considerable variability, mostly due to genetic background and production system. In this study, meat physicochemical properties and fatty acid profiles were analysed to investigate the feasibility of using them as tools to discriminate between meats produced by [...] Read more.
Meat obtained under commercial conditions shows considerable variability, mostly due to genetic background and production system. In this study, meat physicochemical properties and fatty acid profiles were analysed to investigate the feasibility of using them as tools to discriminate between meats produced by different genetic groups and finishing systems. Samples of the Longissimus thoracis were collected from 160 commercial bulls of the B. taurus (n = 75) and B. indicus (n = 85) groups, finished either on pasture (n = 46) or with grain supplementation (n = 114) and analysed by standard procedures. Data were analysed by discriminant analysis using a stepwise procedure, to select the meat characteristics that better contribute to discriminate the various groups. Our results indicate that fatty acid profiles of meat had better discriminating ability than physicochemical properties, especially to identify meat from animals finished on grain or pasture. The overall discrimination of meat from different genetic groups was achieved with a slightly lower reliability. Nonetheless, our results show that reliability of allocation to genetic group can be improved if prior information on finishing system is considered. These results are of high importance because they can be incorporated as tools to assess the authenticity of beef, particularly in meat certification programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quality of Products from Ruminants in Extensive Production Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of GH p.L127V Polymorphism and Feeding Systems on Milk Production Traits and Fatty Acid Composition in Modicana Cows
Animals 2020, 10(9), 1651; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10091651 - 14 Sep 2020
Abstract
Growth hormone participates in the regulation of lactation and lipid metabolism. A trial study was conducted to evaluate the effects of genetic polymorphism at GH p.L127V and its interaction with feeding system (extensive, EX; semi-intensive, SI) on milk traits and fatty acids composition [...] Read more.
Growth hormone participates in the regulation of lactation and lipid metabolism. A trial study was conducted to evaluate the effects of genetic polymorphism at GH p.L127V and its interaction with feeding system (extensive, EX; semi-intensive, SI) on milk traits and fatty acids composition in Modicana cows. In the semi-intensive farm (SI) diet consisted of hay, concentrate and 2 h of grazing. In the extensive farm (EX) feeding consisted in 8 h of grazing and hay. The frequencies of LL, LV and VV genotypes were, respectively: 0.64, 0.34, 0.02. GH polymorphism and its interaction with feeding system did not influence milk yield and composition. Cows carrying LL genotype produced milk with lower 6:0 and 8:0 and higher 16:1 c9 and 18:1 c9, total UFA and total MUFA. Feeding significantly affected fatty acids: in EX cows lower SFA and higher PUFA and UFA were found, compared to SI cows. The lower, more favorable atherogenic index of milk from EX system was coherent with the improved healthy characteristics of milk from animals fed almost exclusively on pasture. A significant interaction genotype x feeding system was evident for 18:1, higher in the LL cows only in the EX system, but not in the SI system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quality of Products from Ruminants in Extensive Production Systems)
Open AccessArticle
Effect of Breed on Fatty Acid Composition of Meat and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue of Light Lambs
Animals 2020, 10(3), 535; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10030535 - 23 Mar 2020
Abstract
Lamb meat is the main product of Central Italy transhumant farms, where lambs are traditionally reared with their mothers on pastures and are supplemented with concentrates and/or hay from day 20–30 until slaughter. However, few data are available on the fatty acid (FA) [...] Read more.
Lamb meat is the main product of Central Italy transhumant farms, where lambs are traditionally reared with their mothers on pastures and are supplemented with concentrates and/or hay from day 20–30 until slaughter. However, few data are available on the fatty acid (FA) composition of unweaned lambs reared by extensive systems in Central Italy. The study aimed to evaluate the effect of breed (Bergamasca, Italian Merino, and Sopravissana) on the FA composition of intramuscular (longissimus lumborum, LL) and subcutaneous (SC) fats of light lambs. Statistical analysis showed that breed had effect only on some FAs in LL muscle fat (C18:0, C20:0, C14:1, C16:1, C17:1, C18:3 n-3, trans and conjugated linoleic acid isomers) and in SC adipose tissue (C21:0, C16:1, C18:1, C20:4 n-6, C20:5 n-3, C18:1 trans isomers). Gas chromatography data in combination with a chemometric approach could have some potential to discriminate among breeds. Indices of nutritional quality of the lipids suggested that the meat of Italian Merino and Sopravissana lambs might have better nutritional quality than Bergamasca; further studies, involving a greater number of animals, are needed to confirm these early results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Quality of Products from Ruminants in Extensive Production Systems)
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