Special Issue "Oxidative Stress in Animal/Poultry Production: Molecular Mechanisms and Protection"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Poultry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Peter F. Surai
Website
Guest Editor
Vitagene and Health Research Centre 53 Dongola Road, Ayr, KA7 3BN, Scotland, UK
Interests: vitamin E; Se; carotenoids; carnitine; betaine; vitagenes; stress adaptaion
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Commercial meat, egg, and milk production is associated with a range of stresses, including environmental, technological, nutritional, and internal/biological stresses. It is important to realise that because of technological restrictions or financial reasons, it is practically impossible to avoid stresses in commercial poultry/animal production, so there is a need to develop optimal strategies to effectively deal with them. Since, on the molecular level, most of commercially-relevant stresses are associated with overproduction of free radicals and the disturbance of the redox homeostasis, nutritional antioxidants became important players in the development of the anti-stress strategy. 

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

    1. Commercially-relevant stresses in poultry and farm animals: protective strategies;
    2.  Molecular mechanisms of interactions between antioxidants: vitamin E and selenium and beyond;
    3. Interactions between dietary antioxidants and drugs in the development of antibiotic free animal/poultry production;
    4. Oxidative stress and poultry diseases/disorders: sudden death syndrome, ascites, breast muscle myopathies (wooden breast, white stripping, stringy-spongy, etc.), etc.;
    5. Preslaughter stress and meat quality;
    6. Maternal effects of dietary antioxidants;
    7. Regulatory roles of microbiota in the redox balance in the gut;
    8. Similarities and differences in antioxidant defence systems between monogastric and ruminant animals;
    9. Antioxidant-enriched food production: prom prevention of oxidative stress in poultry/animals to functional food production;
    10. Omega-3 fatty acids and natural antioxidants—the important interplay between oxidative stress prevention and functional food production.

Prof. Dr. Peter F. Surai
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antioxidants
  • poultry nutrition
  • oxidative stress
  • vitagenes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Total Antioxidant Capacity in Serum of Heathy and Stressed Hens
Animals 2020, 10(11), 2019; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10112019 - 03 Nov 2020
Abstract
Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in healthy and dexamethasone-stressed hens was measured by applying four different spectrophotometric methods—the ferric reducing ability (FRAP) assay, the 2,2′-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzotiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation decolorization assay, the free radical scavenging activity (FRSA), and the total thiol levels (TTL). [...] Read more.
Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in healthy and dexamethasone-stressed hens was measured by applying four different spectrophotometric methods—the ferric reducing ability (FRAP) assay, the 2,2′-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzotiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation decolorization assay, the free radical scavenging activity (FRSA), and the total thiol levels (TTL). TAC assessed by all four methods did not change throughout the experimental period in the control group, whereas significant changes were shown by all adopted assays in the stressed group with some remarkable differences. TAC increased in the stressed group when FRAP and ABTS assays were applied, while it was reduced when sera were assessed by FRSA and TTL assays. Furthermore, FRAP assay was the only test able to show a significant change in TAC immediately after the end of the induced stress. At the end of the experimental period, TAC assessed by ABTS and FRSA assays showed a complete recovery in the stressed group, whereas TAC assessed by FRAP and TTL assays still showed significant persistent differences when compared to the control group. The observed differences in TAC are discussed in the light of the different contribution in each assay of the various antioxidant substances present in the samples. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Modulation of Heat-Shock Proteins Mediates Chicken Cell Survival against Thermal Stress
Animals 2020, 10(12), 2407; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10122407 - 16 Dec 2020
Abstract
Heat stress is one of the most challenging environmental stresses affecting domestic animal production, particularly commercial poultry, subsequently causing severe yearly economic losses. Heat stress, a major source of oxidative stress, stimulates mitochondrial oxidative stress and cell dysfunction, leading to cell damage and [...] Read more.
Heat stress is one of the most challenging environmental stresses affecting domestic animal production, particularly commercial poultry, subsequently causing severe yearly economic losses. Heat stress, a major source of oxidative stress, stimulates mitochondrial oxidative stress and cell dysfunction, leading to cell damage and apoptosis. Cell survival under stress conditions needs urgent response mechanisms and the consequent effective reinitiation of cell functions following stress mitigation. Exposure of cells to heat-stress conditions induces molecules that are ready for mediating cell death and survival signals, and for supporting the cell’s tolerance and/or recovery from damage. Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) confer cell protection against heat stress via different mechanisms, including developing thermotolerance, modulating apoptotic and antiapoptotic signaling pathways, and regulating cellular redox conditions. These functions mainly depend on the capacity of HSPs to work as molecular chaperones and to inhibit the aggregation of non-native and misfolded proteins. This review sheds light on the key factors in heat-shock responses for protection against cell damage induced by heat stress in chicken. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Milk protein biosynthesis of dairy cows under heat stress
Authors: Dengpan Bu
Affiliation: Institute of Animal Science, State Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100193, China; Electronic address

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