Special Issue "Advances in Dietary Protein Research: Shaping Innovative Feeds for a Sustainable Ocean"

A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615). This special issue belongs to the section "Aquatic Animals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Cláudia Aragão
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre of Marine Sciences (CCMAR)/Universidade do Algarve, Faro, Portugal
Interests: aquaculture; nutrition, amino acids; alternative ingredients; fish welfare
Dr. Sofia Engrola
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre of Marine Sciences (CCMAR), Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro, Portugal
Interests: aquaculture; nutrition; growth; protein metabolism; feeding strategies
Dr. Benjamín Costas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research (CIIMAR), University of Porto, Matosinhos, Portugal
Interests: nutritional immunology; functional feeds; amino acids; sustainable aquaculture; animal welfare

Special Issue Information

Aquaculture has been facing the challenge to find alternative ingredients for innovative feed formulations that foster a sustainable future growth. Protein is the most expensive ingredient in feeds for fish and shrimp, and research on alternative proteins to fishmeal is being fruitful in the surge of sustainable feeds. Current knowledge indicates that the importance of protein and its constituents (amino acids) goes beyond growth, and aspects such as fish health and welfare must be taken into consideration in the development of novel feeds.

In this Special Issue, we invite contributions focusing on protein nutrition in fish and shrimp, at all developmental stages, in the following research topics:

  • Protein and amino acid requirements;
  • Alternative/non-conventional dietary proteins;
  • Inclusion of protein hydrolysates and amino acids as nutritional strategies to improve fish performance and robustness;
  • Effects of alternative proteins, hydrolysates, and amino acids on stress and/or immune responses, as well as their impacts on health and welfare.

Gathering information not only on how alternative proteins, hydrolysates, and amino acids affect growth performance and feed efficiency but also on their impacts on the immune system and disease resistance is of utmost importance to the development of innovative diets for fish and shrimp that guarantee a sustainable ocean future.

Dr. Cláudia Aragão
Dr. Sofia Engrola
Dr. Benjamín Costas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Animals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • protein nutrition
  • alternative proteins
  • protein hydrolysates
  • amino acids
  • fish nutrition
  • shrimp nutrition
  • nutrition and health
  • nutrition and welfare
  • nutrition and immune response
  • nutrition and stress response

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Dietary Histidine, Threonine, or Taurine Supplementation Affects Gilthead Seabream (Sparus aurata) Immune Status
Animals 2021, 11(5), 1193; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani11051193 - 21 Apr 2021
Viewed by 393
Abstract
AAs have become interesting feed ingredients to be used in functional fish feeds as not only are they protein building blocks, but they also participate in several other key metabolic processes. In the present study, a comprehensive analysis of transcriptomics, hematology, and humoral [...] Read more.
AAs have become interesting feed ingredients to be used in functional fish feeds as not only are they protein building blocks, but they also participate in several other key metabolic processes. In the present study, a comprehensive analysis of transcriptomics, hematology, and humoral immune parameters (plasma and skin mucus) were measured twice over the course of the feeding trial (four weeks). Plasma antiprotease activity increased in fish fed Thr compared to those fed the CTRL and Tau treatments, regardless of sampling time. The bactericidal activity in skin mucus decreased in fish fed Tau and His treatments compared to those fed the CTRL diet after two weeks. The membrane IgT (mIgT) was upregulated in fish fed Tau after four weeks, while C-type lectin domain family domain 10 member (clec10a) was downregulated in fish fed Thr after two weeks of feeding. By comparing the molecular signatures of head-kidney by means of a PLS-DA, it is possible to visualize that the main difference is between the two sampling points, regardless of diet. Altogether, these results suggest that dietary supplementation with these AAs at the tested levels causes mild immune-modulation effects in gilthead seabream, which should be further studied under disease challenge conditions. Full article
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