Special Issue "Selected papers from “Theorietage der Gesellschaft für Informatik” in Speyer; Invited Talks"

A special issue of Algorithms (ISSN 1999-4893).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Henning Fernau

Theoretical Computer Science, FB 4-Abteilung Informatik, Universität Trier, D-54286 Trier, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +49 (0)651 201 3954
Interests: complexity theory; fixed parameter algorithms; formal languages; fractal geometry; learning algorithms (machine learning) and pattern recognition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The “Gesellschaft für Informatik” (German Informatics Society) is the largest organization of German-based computer scientists. In 2015, the special interest groups of algorithms and complexity, as well as of automata theory and formal languages, held their annual meeting in Speyer. There were a number of invited speakers who attempted to interconnect the above mentioned areas. In this Special Issue, we collate some contributions from the invited speakers that highlight their current research. We would also like to thank MDPI for some financial support for this event. More details can be found via https://www.uni-trier.de/index.php?id=55089&L=2.

Henning Fernau
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Algorithms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Algorithms and Complexity
  • Automata Theory and Formal Languages

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle LR Parsing for LCFRS
Algorithms 2016, 9(3), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/a9030058
Received: 21 March 2016 / Revised: 16 August 2016 / Accepted: 18 August 2016 / Published: 27 August 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (452 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
LR parsing is a popular parsing strategy for variants of Context-Free Grammar (CFG). It has also been used for mildly context-sensitive formalisms, such as Tree-Adjoining Grammar. In this paper, we present the first LR-style parsing algorithm for Linear Context-Free Rewriting Systems (LCFRS), a
[...] Read more.
LR parsing is a popular parsing strategy for variants of Context-Free Grammar (CFG). It has also been used for mildly context-sensitive formalisms, such as Tree-Adjoining Grammar. In this paper, we present the first LR-style parsing algorithm for Linear Context-Free Rewriting Systems (LCFRS), a mildly context-sensitive extension of CFG which has received considerable attention in the last years in the context of natural language processing. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle A Gentle Introduction to Applications of Algorithmic Metatheorems for Space and Circuit Classes
Algorithms 2016, 9(3), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/a9030044
Received: 3 March 2016 / Revised: 24 June 2016 / Accepted: 28 June 2016 / Published: 9 July 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (582 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Algorithmic metatheorems state that if a problem can be described in a certain logic and the inputs are structured in a certain way, then the problem can be solved with a certain amount of resources. As an example, by Courcelle’s Theorem, all monadic
[...] Read more.
Algorithmic metatheorems state that if a problem can be described in a certain logic and the inputs are structured in a certain way, then the problem can be solved with a certain amount of resources. As an example, by Courcelle’s Theorem, all monadic second-order (“in a certain logic”) properties of graphs of bounded tree width (“structured in a certain way”) can be solved in linear time (“with a certain amount of resources”). Such theorems have become valuable tools in algorithmics: if a problem happens to have the right structure and can be described in the right logic, they immediately yield a (typically tight) upper bound on the time complexity of the problem. Perhaps even more importantly, several complex algorithms rely on algorithmic metatheorems internally to solve subproblems, which considerably broadens the range of applications of these theorems. This paper is intended as a gentle introduction to the ideas behind algorithmic metatheorems, especially behind some recent results concerning space and circuit classes, and tries to give a flavor of the range of their applications. Full article
Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Uniform vs. Nonuniform Membership for Mildly Context-Sensitive Languages: A Brief Survey
Algorithms 2016, 9(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/a9020032
Received: 8 March 2016 / Revised: 19 April 2016 / Accepted: 27 April 2016 / Published: 11 May 2016
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (235 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Parsing for mildly context-sensitive language formalisms is an important area within natural language processing. While the complexity of the parsing problem for some such formalisms is known to be polynomial, this is not the case for all of them. This article presents a
[...] Read more.
Parsing for mildly context-sensitive language formalisms is an important area within natural language processing. While the complexity of the parsing problem for some such formalisms is known to be polynomial, this is not the case for all of them. This article presents a series of results regarding the complexity of parsing for linear context-free rewriting systems and deterministic tree-walking transducers. We discuss the difference between uniform and nonuniform complexity measures and how parameterized complexity theory can be used to investigate how different aspects of the formalisms influence how hard the parsing problem is. The main results we survey are all hardness results and indicate that parsing is hard even for relatively small values of parameters such as rank and fan-out in a rewriting system. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Multivariate Algorithmics for Finding Cohesive Subnetworks
Algorithms 2016, 9(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/a9010021
Received: 18 January 2016 / Revised: 8 March 2016 / Accepted: 9 March 2016 / Published: 16 March 2016
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (340 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Community detection is an important task in the analysis of biological, social or technical networks. We survey different models of cohesive graphs, commonly referred to as clique relaxations, that are used in the detection of network communities. For each clique relaxation, we
[...] Read more.
Community detection is an important task in the analysis of biological, social or technical networks. We survey different models of cohesive graphs, commonly referred to as clique relaxations, that are used in the detection of network communities. For each clique relaxation, we give an overview of basic model properties and of the complexity of the problem of finding large cohesive subgraphs under this model. Since this problem is usually NP-hard, we focus on combinatorial fixed-parameter algorithms exploiting typical structural properties of input networks. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessMeeting Report Theorietage der Gesellschaft für Informatik in Speyer 2015—Special Issue
Algorithms 2016, 9(4), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/a9040064
Received: 27 August 2016 / Revised: 16 September 2016 / Accepted: 20 September 2016 / Published: 26 September 2016
PDF Full-text (159 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We briefly report on the national workshops on Formal Languages and Automata Theory as well as on Algorithms and Complexity Theory held in early Autumn, 2015. Full article
Back to Top