Special Issue "Advances in Agriculture Mechanization"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Aitazaz A. Farooque, P.Eng
Website
Guest Editor
University of Prince Edward Island, Canada
Interests: To develop precision agriculture technologies for economically viable, environmentally safe and sustainable agriculture.
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent advances in agricultural mechanization/machinery/practices have attracted the attentions of various stakeholders, including growers, machinery manufactures, and food processing industries. Agricultural mechanization has almost replaced human and animal agricultural operations, creating a comfortable, safe, and attractive environment for workers, and enhanced work efficiency. These advances in agricultural mechanization are making their way to address the challenges of food security in the coming decades, as agricultural land is shrinking because of urbanization. Coupling of intelligent sensing and control systems in traditional farming operations (ploughing, seeding, irrigation, fertilization, pesticide applications, nutrient management, etc.) are expanding enormously due to their economic and environmental benefits. This Special Issue covers the recent advances in agriculture mechanization, including machine design, post harvesting technologies, precision agriculture technologies, variable rate applications, spatial and temporal variability, soil and water management, irrigation and drainage, and integration of sensors and control systems in agricultural machinery.

Topics:

We invite researchers to contribute original research articles, as well as review articles, to this Special Issue. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  1. Machine design
  2. Performance efficiency of agricultural equipment
  3. Precision agriculture technologies
  4. Sensing and control systems for agricultural machines
  5. Soil and water management
  6. Irrigation and drainage
  7. Post harvesting technologies
  8. Variable rate applicators
  9. GPS and GIS involvement in agriculture
  10. Management of spatial and temporal variability
  11. Sensors for agriculture

Dr. Aitazaz A. Farooque
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sensors
  • Integrated agriculture operations
  • High efficiency irrigation
  • Soil and crop variability
  • Performance of agriculture equipment
  • Agricultural engineering
  • Agronomy
  • Soil science
  • Bioengineering
  • Drainage
  • DGPS and GIS mapping
  • Bioresources
  • Control systems
  • Post harvest losses

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Heat Recovery Systems for Agricultural Vehicles: Utilization Ways and Their Efficiency
Agriculture 2018, 8(12), 199; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8120199 - 12 Dec 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
The focus of today’s agriculture is to reduce fuel consumption and pollutant emission. More than 50% of the fuel energy is lost with the exhaust gas and coolant of diesel engines. Therefore, waste heat recovery systems are a promising concept to meet economical [...] Read more.
The focus of today’s agriculture is to reduce fuel consumption and pollutant emission. More than 50% of the fuel energy is lost with the exhaust gas and coolant of diesel engines. Therefore, waste heat recovery systems are a promising concept to meet economical and ecological requirements. Agricultural vehicles have an operating cycle that is quite different from on-road trucks (higher engine load factor and less annual utilization). This has influence on the efficiency of waste heat recovery. The purpose of this paper was to analyze different waste heat recovery technologies to be used in agricultural applications. In the study, technical and economic indicators have been used. According to suggested classification, four pathways for utilization were studied. Turbocompounding, electric turbocompounding, and heating of transmission oil for hydraulic clutch gearboxes have proved to be effective for agricultural vehicles. For the economical conditions of the European Union (EU), a turbocompounding diesel engine is acceptable if agricultural tractor rated power is more than 275 kW, and combine harvester rated power is more than 310 kW. In cold climates, heat recovery transmission warm-up may be recommended. Waste heat absorption refrigerators have proven to be a viable technology for air conditioning and intake air cooling systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Agriculture Mechanization)
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Open AccessArticle
Definition of Reference Models for Power, Weight, Working Width, and Price for Seeding Machines
Agriculture 2018, 8(12), 186; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8120186 - 29 Nov 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Machine functional parameters define fleet composition and management and, thus, play an important role in economic and environmental performance. Large availability of programming methods and decision support systems are available in the market, however, there is still a lack of applicative tools to [...] Read more.
Machine functional parameters define fleet composition and management and, thus, play an important role in economic and environmental performance. Large availability of programming methods and decision support systems are available in the market, however, there is still a lack of applicative tools to forecast the perceived and necessary technical parameters and machinery price options to complete tasks. In the current research, most correlated functional parameters for four group of seeding machines were determined with the application of linear and multiple linear regression analyses. Power, weight, working width, number of rows, and list price were studied, and reference equations were developed for seed drills, precision, combined and no-tillage planters. Two statistical analyses models were, therefore, developed for each of the groups in order to allow evaluation and prediction of performance and cost, thus contributing to the selection process optimisation and perceived choice of the needed implement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Agriculture Mechanization)
Open AccessArticle
A Mathematical Model of the Plane-Parallel Movement of an Asymmetric Machine-and-Tractor Aggregate
Agriculture 2018, 8(10), 151; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8100151 - 01 Oct 2018
Cited by 10
Abstract
Technological peculiarities of cultivation and harvesting of some agricultural crops make it necessary to use asymmetric machine-and-tractor aggregates. However, for the time being there is no sufficiently complete, analytical study of the steady movement of such machine-and-tractor aggregates. This necessitates the development of [...] Read more.
Technological peculiarities of cultivation and harvesting of some agricultural crops make it necessary to use asymmetric machine-and-tractor aggregates. However, for the time being there is no sufficiently complete, analytical study of the steady movement of such machine-and-tractor aggregates. This necessitates the development of a theory of stable movement of the aggregates which would allow choosing their optimal kinematic and design parameters. On the basis of the results of mathematical simulation, a system of linear differential equations of the second order is obtained describing transverse displacement of the center of masses of the aggregating wheeled tractor and turning of its longitudinal axis of symmetry by some angle around the indicated center of mass, as well as the deviation angle of the rear-trailed harvester from the longitudinal axis of the tractor at any arbitrary moment of time. This system of differential equations can be applied for numerical calculations on the PC, which will make it possible to evaluate the stability of the movement of the asymmetric machine-and-tractor aggregate when it performs the technological process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Agriculture Mechanization)
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Open AccessArticle
Application of Geographic Information System and Automated Guidance System in Optimizing Contour and Terrace Farming
Agriculture 2018, 8(9), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8090142 - 14 Sep 2018
Abstract
Farming contour and terrace fields using automated guidance systems with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers requires appropriate geographic features for effective guidance and soil and water conservation. The objective of this paper was to develop methodologies for improving and designing guidance features [...] Read more.
Farming contour and terrace fields using automated guidance systems with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers requires appropriate geographic features for effective guidance and soil and water conservation. The objective of this paper was to develop methodologies for improving and designing guidance features for operating guidance systems in contour and terrace fields. This study was conducted in the Texas High Plains where contour and terrace farming practices are prevalent in slope fields. Four case studies were used to demonstrate the application of a geographic information system (GIS) in optimizing guidance geographic features, including line smoothing, line extending and connecting, creating swath AB lines, and guide-to-line features. Line smoothing removes sharp angularities and curve oscillations on guidance line features, resulting in smooth and more effective guidance operations. The line extension and connection method creates a more convenient and simple guidance feature by combining multiple AB lines. Guide-to-line features derived from AB lines can eliminate confusions when using a guidance system with multiple AB lines in fields with complicated topographic attributes. A methodology was also developed to create guidance AB lines by processing the elevation data generated by a guidance system with a real-time kinematic (RTK) receiver. Guidance line features created in this study satisfy user requirements for effective guidance operations and soil and water conservation. Integrating the application of GIS spatial analysis capabilities and automated guidance systems can enhance farming operations by improving or creating guidance line features, as well as satisfying soil and water conservation needs. Parameter selection for enhancing or creating guidance line features needs to consider unique field conditions and user requirements for simple, convenient, and effective field operations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Agriculture Mechanization)
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Open AccessTechnical Note
Comparison between Different Rotary Mowing Systems: Testing a New Method to Calculate Turfgrass Mowing Quality
Agriculture 2018, 8(10), 152; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8100152 - 02 Oct 2018
Abstract
Poor quality in turfgrass mowing is highlighted by the shredded leaf tips with necrotic tissues that give an unsightly brownish colour to the turf and may also lead to turf disease. Mowing quality is also typically assessed by visual rating, thus the score [...] Read more.
Poor quality in turfgrass mowing is highlighted by the shredded leaf tips with necrotic tissues that give an unsightly brownish colour to the turf and may also lead to turf disease. Mowing quality is also typically assessed by visual rating, thus the score depends on the person doing the assessment. To make the evaluation of mowing quality not subjective, an innovative method was developed. The aim of the trial was to examine the effects of different mowing systems and two different nitrogen rates (100 and 200 kg ha−1) on two turfgrass species in order to test the new mowing quality calculation. Three different mowing systems were used: a battery-powered rotary mower set at 3000 rpm and 5000 rpm respectively and a gasoline-powered rotary mower set at full throttle. The battery-powered mower at low blade rpm produced a poorer mowing quality and turf quality than the gasoline-powered mower and battery-powered mower at high rpm, which produced a similar mowing quality and turf quality. Leaf tip damage level values showed a significant correlation with the results of the visual mowing quality assessment. Lower leaf tip damage level values (slightly above 1) corresponded to higher visual mowing quality scores (around 8). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Agriculture Mechanization)
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