Special Issue "Acoustics in Biomedical Engineering"

A special issue of Acoustics (ISSN 2624-599X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Fardin Khalili
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, FL 32826, USA
Interests: structural acoustics and vibration; bioacoustics and sound in biological systems; CFD and FSI; flow-induced vibration and acoustics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Amirtahà Taebi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA
Interests: biomedical signal and image processing; noninvasive physiological monitoring; medical instrumentation; machine learning
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Hansen A. Mansy
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA
Interests: vibrational and acoustic phenomena in biological systems; acoustic models of soft tissues; flow induced vibrations; vibro-acoustic sensors; electromechanical systems; digital signal processing; biostatistics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to present the very latest progress in acoustics, vibrations, and fluid–structure interactions techniques that would be a beneficial for sound analysis in biomedical applications. For biomedical applications, there are many situations such a listening to the blood flow through patients' heart valves from the chest/skin, or listening to the air flow in patients' lung airways with different levels of stenosis. In these cases, air and blood turbulent flows exist in a flow-bounded domain which interact with solid rigid/elastic/moving bodies like mechanical heart valves or tumors in lung airways.

Our aim is to publish studies that reveal how mechanical vibration and sound impact the design and performance of engineered medical devices and improve non-invasive monitoring, analysis and diagnostic techniques of biological systems. This Special Issue: “Acoustics in Biomedical Engineering”, covers research results involving the application of mechanical and electrical engineering principles with a focus on developments in numerical methods and experimental techniques. “Acoustics in Biomedical Engineering” publishes original research and review articles in a wide range of topics including, but not limited to:

  • Cardiovascular and respiratory biomechanics: mechanics of blood-flow, air-flow, mechanics of the soft tissues, flow-tissue or flow-prosthesis interactions
  • Computational methods for analyzing the performance of medical devices, artificial organs, and prostheses
  • Bioacoustics and sound in biological systems
  • Biomedical signal processing and medical device development
  • Structural acoustics and vibration
  • Engineering acoustics, sound transducers, and measurements
  • Fluid-structure Interactions and Flow-induced vibration
  • Acoustic Signal Processing

Dr. Fardin Khalili
Dr. Amirtahà Taebi
Dr. Hansen A. Mansy
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Acoustics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Acoustics
  • Vibration
  • Sound transducers and measurements
  • Bioacoustics
  • Fluid-structure Interactions (FSI)
  • Flow-induced vibration
  • Acoustic Signal Processing

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Numerical Simulations of the Nonlinear Interaction of a Bubble Cloud and a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Field
Acoustics 2019, 1(4), 825-836; https://doi.org/10.3390/acoustics1040049 - 29 Oct 2019
Abstract
We studied the effects of a small bubble cloud located at the pre-focal area of a high-intensity focused ultrasound field. Our objective is to show that bubbles can modify the bioeffects of an ultrasound treatment in muscle tissue. We model a three-dimensional ultrasound [...] Read more.
We studied the effects of a small bubble cloud located at the pre-focal area of a high-intensity focused ultrasound field. Our objective is to show that bubbles can modify the bioeffects of an ultrasound treatment in muscle tissue. We model a three-dimensional ultrasound field in an idealized configuration of real operating conditions. Simulations are performed using a combined method based on the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov equation, describing the ultrasound propagation, and a Rayleigh-Plesset equation, modeling the bubble oscillations. The nonlinear interaction of the ultrasound field and the bubble oscillations is considered. Results with and without bubbles for different void fractions of the cloud and different acoustic powers are compared. The cloud induces scattering, nonlinear distortion, and shielding of ultrasound, which increase the mechanical index in the pre-focal zone, shift the location, reduce the size, and modify the shape of the volume of tissue of high mechanical index values, and lower the pressure at the intended focus considerably. Although some hypothesis and parameters used in the models do not fit the real HIFU situations, the simulation results suggest that the effects caused by a bubble cloud located in the pre-focal area should be considered and monitored to ensure the safety of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustics in Biomedical Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Nonlinear Distortions and Parametric Amplification Generate Otoacoustic Emissions and Increased Hearing Sensitivity
Acoustics 2019, 1(3), 608-617; https://doi.org/10.3390/acoustics1030036 - 02 Aug 2019
Abstract
The ear is able to detect low-level acoustic signals by a highly specialized system including a parametric amplifier in the cochlea. This is verified by a numerical mechanical model of the cochlea, which reduces the three-dimensional (3D) system to a one-dimensional (1D) approach. [...] Read more.
The ear is able to detect low-level acoustic signals by a highly specialized system including a parametric amplifier in the cochlea. This is verified by a numerical mechanical model of the cochlea, which reduces the three-dimensional (3D) system to a one-dimensional (1D) approach. A formerly developed mechanical model permits the consideration of the fluid and the orthotropic basilar membrane in a 1D fluid-structure coupled system. This model shows the characteristic frequency to place transformation of the traveling wave in the cochlea. The additional inclusion of time and space dependent stiffness of outer hair cells and the signal level dependent stiffness of the string enables parametric amplification of the input signal. Due to the nonlinear outer hair cell stiffness change, nonlinear distortions follow as a byproduct of the parametric amplification at low levels constituting the compressive nonlinearity. More distortions are generated by the saturating displacements of the string at high input levels, which can be distinguished from the low-level distortions by the order of additional harmonics. Amplification factors of 15.5 d B and 24.0 d B are calculated, and a change of the traveling-wave mapping is postulated with parametric amplification representing the healthy state of the cochlea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustics in Biomedical Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
The 3D Spatial Autocorrelation of the Branching Fractal Vasculature
Acoustics 2019, 1(2), 369-381; https://doi.org/10.3390/acoustics1020020 - 09 Apr 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
The fractal branching vasculature within soft tissues and the mathematical properties of the branching system influence a wide range of important phenomena from blood velocity to ultrasound backscatter. Among the mathematical descriptors of branching networks, the spatial autocorrelation function plays an important role [...] Read more.
The fractal branching vasculature within soft tissues and the mathematical properties of the branching system influence a wide range of important phenomena from blood velocity to ultrasound backscatter. Among the mathematical descriptors of branching networks, the spatial autocorrelation function plays an important role in statistical measures of the tissue and of wave propagation through the tissue. However, there are open questions about analytic models of the 3D autocorrelation function for the branching vasculature and few experimental validations for soft vascularized tissue. To address this, high resolution computed tomography scans of a highly vascularized placenta perfused with radiopaque contrast through the umbilical artery were examined. The spatial autocorrelation function was found to be consistent with a power law, which then, in theory, predicts the specific power law behavior of other related functions, including the backscatter of ultrasound. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustics in Biomedical Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Nonlinear Propagation of Focused Ultrasound on the Stable Cavitation of a Single Bubble
Acoustics 2019, 1(1), 14-34; https://doi.org/10.3390/acoustics1010003 - 06 Dec 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Many biomedical applications such as ultrasonic targeted drug delivery, gene therapy, and molecular imaging entail the problems of manipulating microbubbles by means of a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) pressure field; namely stable cavitation. In high-intensity acoustic field, bubbles demonstrate translational instability, the well-known [...] Read more.
Many biomedical applications such as ultrasonic targeted drug delivery, gene therapy, and molecular imaging entail the problems of manipulating microbubbles by means of a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) pressure field; namely stable cavitation. In high-intensity acoustic field, bubbles demonstrate translational instability, the well-known erratic dancing motion, which is caused by shape oscillations of the bubbles that are excited by their volume oscillations. The literature of bubble dynamics in the HIFU field is mainly centered on experiments, lacking a systematic study to determine the threshold for shape oscillations and translational motion. In this work, we extend the existing multiphysics mathematical modeling platform on bubble dynamics for taking account of (1) the liquid compressibility which allows us to apply a high-intensity acoustic field; (2) the mutual interactions of volume pulsation, shape modes, and translational motion; as well as (3) the effects of nonlinearity, diffraction, and absorption of HIFU to incorporate the acoustic nonlinearity due to wave kinematics or medium—all in one model. The effects of acoustic nonlinearity on the radial pulsations, axisymmetric modes of shape oscillations, and translational motion of a bubble, subjected to resonance and off-resonance excitation and various acoustic pressure, are examined. The results reveal the importance of considering all the involved harmonics and wave distortion in the bubble dynamics, to accurately predict the oscillations, translational trajectories, and the threshold for inertial (unstable) cavitation. This result is of interest for understanding the bubble dynamical behaviors observed experimentally in the HIFU field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Acoustics in Biomedical Engineering)
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