Special Issue "Intersession Management and Remote Therapeutic Intervention Support"

A special issue of J — Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal (ISSN 2571-8800).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (21 July 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Rüdiger Pryss
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Databases and Information Systems, Ulm University, Ulm 89081, Germany
Interests: mobile process management; mobile services; computer-based medical systems; mobile crowdsensing; mHealth
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
PD Dr. Winfried Schlee
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Regensburg, Regensburg 93053, Germany
Interests: tinnitus; connectivity; neuronal variability; mobile crowd sensing; medical databases
Prof. Dr. Harald Baumeister
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Institute of Psychology and Education, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, D-89069 Ulm, Germany
Interests: clinical psychology; health psychology; psychological diagnostics
Dr. Patrick Neff
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1 Neuroplasticity and Learning in the Healthy Aging Brain, University of Zurich, Zurich CH-8050, Switzerland
2 Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Regensburg, Regensburg 93053, Germany
Interests: neuropsychology, tinnitus, mobile sensing, acoustics
Prof. Dr. Thomas Probst
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department for Psychotherapy and Biopsychosocial Health, Danube University Krems, Krems an der Donau 3500, Austria
Interests: psychotherapy research; clinical psychology; diagnostics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many studies have confirmed that therapeutic interventions constitute a fundamental part of most therapies as they increase their efficacy. The variety of therapeutic interventions, in turn, ranges from simple medication intakes up to complex behavioral therapies including homework, which is assigned by a therapist to the patient. In particular, homework supports therapeutic progress and helps to transfer therapeutic achievements from the clinical setting to the real-life situation of the patient at home. Taking this diversity into account, many therapists crave for a more sophisticated IT support. In line with this trend, recent studies revealed that (1) utilizing smart mobile devices are demanded by therapists and (2) that they can be used to obtain new insights in clinical research. However, existing approaches still come with several drawbacks. First, they mainly provide specifically tailored applications and often do not cope with the diversity of therapeutic interventions. Second, they neither consider the execution context of homework properly nor the provision of feedback. Third, existing solutions focus on the therapist-patient relationship and, therefore, neglect emerging opportunities (e.g., context-sensitive data) in this context.  Fourth, features provided by current smart mobile devices (e.g., sensors) have seldomly been used for therapeutic interventions. More generally, the development of information systems, which support homework in the context of therapeutic interventions and intersession management has not been sufficiently addressed so far. When realizing information systems that integrate, for example, smart mobile devices, the common procedure of therapeutic interventions in general and homework in particular must be carefully captured by the system. Therefore, relevant requirements must be elicited in real-world projects. Based on such requirements, new IT platform approaches enabling therapists to manage therapeutic interventions remotely can be designed and realized. Using such platforms, homework can be created, for example, with a web-based component and be performed by patients with the help of, for example, smart mobile devices. Moreover, beyond the technical issues when capturing remote therapeutic interventions and intersession management digitally, many interdisciplinary questions arise, which need to be addressed. For example, what about ethical aspects, privacy issues, or evolving demands of therapists.  Therefore, the aim of this special issue is the investigation of challenges, opportunities, and new questions when addressing intersession management and remote therapeutic interventions by adding IT-support to these environments. To be more precise, the following research questions, inter alia, shall be addressed by this Special Issue:

  • What are the drawbacks and limitations of IT-supported therapeutic interventions?
  • What means sensor usage in this context?
  • Can we derive new insights into the performance of intersession management and remote therapeutic interventions?
  • What are the general risks of IT-support in this context?
  • What means context-awareness in this environment?
  • What constitutes a suitable IT-support in this context?
  • Which new medical issues arise?
  • Which new psychological issues arise?
  • What are the demands of therapists?
  • What are the demands of patients?
  • What about legal and ethical aspects in this context?
  • What means feedback in this context?
  • What means data quality in this context?
  • What are the core features of a comprehensive IT-supported intersession management?

This Special Issue aims to provide a comprehensive overview of new approaches and disruptive ideas for an IT-Support of intersession management and remote therapeutic interventions. We invite research articles that will consolidate our understanding of the state-of-the-art in this area. The Special Issue will publish full research, review, and highly rated manuscripts addressing the above issues, including any of the topics mentioned in the keywords listed below.

Dr. Rüdiger Pryss
PD Dr. Winfried Schlee
Prof. Dr. Harald Baumeister
Dr. Patrick Neff
Prof. Dr. Thomas Probst
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. J — Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mobile Interventions
  • Internet Interventions
  • Mobile Therapy
  • Internet Therapy
  • Therapeutic Home
  • Intersession Management
  • Remote Therapy
  • IT-supported Therapies
  • Sensors
  • Ecological Momentary Assessment
  • Therapy Monitoring
  • Ad-hoc Therapy Feedback
  • IT-supported Therapy Feedback
  • Legal Aspects
  • Ethical Aspects

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Intersession-Online: A Smartphone Application for Systematic Recording and Controlling of Intersession Experiences in Psychotherapy
J 2019, 2(4), 480-495; https://doi.org/10.3390/j2040031 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
Mobile health technologies have become more and more important in psychotherapy research and practice. The market is being flooded by several psychotherapeutic online services for different purposes. However, mobile health technologies are particularly suitable for data collection and monitoring, as data can be [...] Read more.
Mobile health technologies have become more and more important in psychotherapy research and practice. The market is being flooded by several psychotherapeutic online services for different purposes. However, mobile health technologies are particularly suitable for data collection and monitoring, as data can be recorded economically in real time. Currently, there is no appropriate method to assess intersession experiences systematically in psychotherapeutic practice. The aim of our project was the development of a smartphone application framework for systematic recording and controlling of intersession experiences. Intersession-Online, an iOS- and Android-App, offers the possibility to collect data on intersession experiences easily, to provide the results to therapists in an evaluated form and, if necessary, to induce or interrupt intersession experiences with the primary aim to improve outcome of psychotherapy. In general, the smartphone application could be a helpful, evidence-based tool for research and practice. Overall speaking, further research to investigate the efficacy of Intersession-Online is necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intersession Management and Remote Therapeutic Intervention Support)
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Open AccessArticle
Concept, Possibilities and Pilot-Testing of a New Smartphone Application for the Social and Life Sciences to Study Human Behavior Including Validation Data from Personality Psychology
J 2019, 2(2), 102-115; https://doi.org/10.3390/j2020008 - 27 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
With the advent of the World Wide Web, the smartphone and the Internet of Things, not only society but also the sciences are rapidly changing. In particular, the social sciences can profit from these digital developments, because now scientists have the power to [...] Read more.
With the advent of the World Wide Web, the smartphone and the Internet of Things, not only society but also the sciences are rapidly changing. In particular, the social sciences can profit from these digital developments, because now scientists have the power to study real-life human behavior via smartphones and other devices connected to the Internet of Things on a large-scale level. Although this sounds easy, scientists often face the problem that no practicable solution exists to participate in such a new scientific movement, due to a lack of an interdisciplinary network. If so, the development time of a new product, such as a smartphone application to get insights into human behavior takes an enormous amount of time and resources. Given this problem, the present work presents an easy way to use a smartphone application, which can be applied by social scientists to study a large range of scientific questions. The application provides measurements of variables via tracking smartphone–use patterns, such as call behavior, application use (e.g., social media), GPS and many others. In addition, the presented Android-based smartphone application, called Insights, can also be used to administer self-report questionnaires for conducting experience sampling and to search for co-variations between smartphone usage/smartphone data and self-report data. Of importance, the present work gives a detailed overview on how to conduct a study using an application such as Insights, starting from designing the study, installing the application to analyzing the data. In the present work, server requirements and privacy issues are also discussed. Furthermore, first validation data from personality psychology are presented. Such validation data are important in establishing trust in the applied technology to track behavior. In sum, the aim of the present work is (i) to provide interested scientists a short overview on how to conduct a study with smartphone app tracking technology, (ii) to present the features of the designed smartphone application and (iii) to demonstrate its validity with a proof of concept study, hence correlating smartphone usage with personality measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Intersession Management and Remote Therapeutic Intervention Support)
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