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The Association of Media and Environmental Variables with Transit Ridership

1
Department of City & Metropolitan Planning, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
2
Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
3
NEXUS Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
4
Department of Political Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Vehicles 2020, 2(3), 507-522; https://doi.org/10.3390/vehicles2030028
Received: 4 July 2020 / Revised: 8 August 2020 / Accepted: 11 August 2020 / Published: 12 August 2020
Transportation systems are central to all cities, and city planners and policy makers take special interest in assuring these systems are efficient, functional, sustainable, and, increasingly, that they have a positive impact on human health. In addition, vehicular emissions are increasingly costly to cities due to congestion and its impact on public health. This study aims to show the associations between the media and environmental variables and associated transit ridership. By tracking media influence, we illustrated how media coverage and attention to an issue over time may impact public opinion and ridership outcomes, especially at the local level where the issues are most salient. The relationship between air quality and transit ridership shown can be generally explained through a combination of infrastructure and human behavior. The media key terms examined in this analysis show that ridership is associated with favorable weather conditions and air quality, suggesting that ridership volume may be influenced by an overall sense of comfort and safety. Based on this analysis, we illustrated the role of media attention in both increased and decreased transit ridership and how such effects are compounded by air quality conditions (e.g., green, yellow, orange, and red air quality days). View Full-Text
Keywords: public transit; media influence; meteorological variables; ridership variability; discretionary trips; commute trips; transit ridership; perception; public transportation; air quality public transit; media influence; meteorological variables; ridership variability; discretionary trips; commute trips; transit ridership; perception; public transportation; air quality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mendoza, D.L.; Buchert, M.P.; Benney, T.M.; Lin, J.C. The Association of Media and Environmental Variables with Transit Ridership. Vehicles 2020, 2, 507-522. https://doi.org/10.3390/vehicles2030028

AMA Style

Mendoza DL, Buchert MP, Benney TM, Lin JC. The Association of Media and Environmental Variables with Transit Ridership. Vehicles. 2020; 2(3):507-522. https://doi.org/10.3390/vehicles2030028

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mendoza, Daniel L., Martin P. Buchert, Tabitha M. Benney, and John C. Lin 2020. "The Association of Media and Environmental Variables with Transit Ridership" Vehicles 2, no. 3: 507-522. https://doi.org/10.3390/vehicles2030028

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