Next Article in Journal
Investigating the Potential Impact of Louisiana Coastal Restoration on the Trace Metal Geochemistry of Constructed Marshlands
Next Article in Special Issue
Have Sustained Acidic Deposition Decreases Led to Increased Calcium Availability in Recovering Watersheds of the Adirondack Region of New York, USA?
Previous Article in Journal
Adsorption, Desorption and Bioavailability of Tungstate in Mediterranean Soils
Previous Article in Special Issue
Landscape Influence on the Browning of a Lake Watershed in the Adirondack Region of New York, USA
Article

Reversal of Forest Soil Acidification in the Northeastern United States and Eastern Canada: Site and Soil Factors Contributing to Recovery

1
Natural Resources Canada–Canadian Forest Service 1219 Queen St. E., Sault Ste. Marie, ON P6A 2E5, Canada
2
U.S. Geological Survey New York Water Science Center, 425 Jordan Road, Troy, NY 12180, USA
3
School of Forest Resources, University of Maine, Deering Hall, Orono, ME 04469-5722, USA
4
Direction de la Recherche Forestière, Ministère des Forêt, de la Faune et des Parcs du Québec, Complexe Scientifique, 2700 Einstein Street, Quebec City, QC G1P 3W8, Canada
5
Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station, 234 Mirror Lake Road, North Woodstock, NH 03262, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Soil Syst. 2020, 4(3), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems4030054
Received: 25 June 2020 / Revised: 7 August 2020 / Accepted: 18 August 2020 / Published: 27 August 2020
As acidic deposition has decreased across Eastern North America, forest soils at some sites are beginning to show reversal of soil acidification. However, the degree of recovery appears to vary and is not fully explained by deposition declines alone. To assess if other site and soil factors can help to explain degree of recovery from acid deposition, soil resampling chemistry data (8- to 24-year time interval) from 23 sites in the United States and Canada, located across 25° longitude from Eastern Maine to Western Ontario, were explored. Site and soil factors included recovery years, sulfate (SO42−) deposition history, SO42− reduction rate, C horizon pH and exchangeable calcium (Ca), O and B horizon pH, base saturation, and exchangeable Ca and aluminum (Al) at the time of the initial sampling. We found that O and B horizons that were initially acidified to a greater degree showed greater recovery and B horizon recovery was further associated with an increase in recovery years and lower initial SO42− deposition. Forest soils that seemingly have low buffering capacity and a reduced potential for recovery have the resilience to recover from the effects of previous high levels of acidic deposition. This suggests, that predictions of where forest soils acidification reversal will occur across the landscape should be refined to acknowledge the importance of upper soil profile horizon chemistry rather than the more traditional approach using only parent material characteristics. View Full-Text
Keywords: acidic deposition; forest soil recovery; pH; base saturation; exchangeable cations acidic deposition; forest soil recovery; pH; base saturation; exchangeable cations
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hazlett, P.; Emilson, C.; Lawrence, G.; Fernandez, I.; Ouimet, R.; Bailey, S. Reversal of Forest Soil Acidification in the Northeastern United States and Eastern Canada: Site and Soil Factors Contributing to Recovery. Soil Syst. 2020, 4, 54. https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems4030054

AMA Style

Hazlett P, Emilson C, Lawrence G, Fernandez I, Ouimet R, Bailey S. Reversal of Forest Soil Acidification in the Northeastern United States and Eastern Canada: Site and Soil Factors Contributing to Recovery. Soil Systems. 2020; 4(3):54. https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems4030054

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hazlett, Paul, Caroline Emilson, Greg Lawrence, Ivan Fernandez, Rock Ouimet, and Scott Bailey. 2020. "Reversal of Forest Soil Acidification in the Northeastern United States and Eastern Canada: Site and Soil Factors Contributing to Recovery" Soil Systems 4, no. 3: 54. https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems4030054

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop