Next Article in Journal
Schistosoma and Other Relevant Helminth Infections in HIV-Positive Individuals—An Overview
Next Article in Special Issue
Human Bartonellosis: An Underappreciated Public Health Problem?
Previous Article in Journal
Ultrastructural Features of Human Liver Specimens from Patients Who Died of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever
Open AccessArticle

Development of a Low-Density DNA Microarray for Detecting Tick-Borne Bacterial and Piroplasmid Pathogens in African Cattle

1
Institute of Evolution and Ecology, Department of Comparative Zoology, University of Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 28, D-72076 Tübingen, Germany
2
Programme Onchocercoses field station of the University of Tübingen, P.O. Box. 65 Ngaoundéré, Cameroon
3
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Ngaoundéré, P.O. Box 454 Ngaoundéré, Cameroon
4
Trypanosomosis Onchocerciasis Zoonoses Association for Research & Development, Research Laboratory, Bambili-Tubah, P.O. Box 59 Bamenda, Cameroon
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Institute of Novel and Emerging Infectious Diseases, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Südufer 10, D-17493 Greifswald–Insel Riems, Germany.
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4(2), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4020064
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 5 April 2019 / Accepted: 9 April 2019 / Published: 12 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advancements on Arthropod-Borne Infectious Diseases)
In Africa, pathogens transmitted by ticks are of major concern in livestock production and human health. Despite noticeable improvements particularly of molecular screening methods, their widespread availability and the detection of multiple infections remain challenging. Hence, we developed a universally accessible and robust tool for the detection of bacterial pathogens and piroplasmid parasites of cattle. A low-cost and low-density chip DNA microarray kit (LCD-Array) was designed and tested towards its specificity and sensitivity for five genera causing tick-borne diseases. The blood samples used for this study were collected from cattle in Northern Cameroon. Altogether, 12 species of the genera Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia and Theileria, and their corresponding genus-wide probes including Babesia were tested on a single LCD-Array. The detection limit of plasmid controls by PCR ranged from 1 to 75 copies per µL depending on the species. All sequenced species hybridized on the LCD-Array. As expected, PCR, agarose gel electrophoresis and Sanger sequencing found significantly less pathogens than the LCD-Array (p < 0.001). Theileria and Rickettsia had lower detection limits than Anaplasma and Ehrlichia. The parallel identification of some of the most detrimental tick-borne pathogens of livestock, and the possible implementation in small molecular-diagnostic laboratories with limited capacities makes the LCD-Array an appealing asset. View Full-Text
Keywords: tick-borne pathogen; low-cost and low-density-array; Reverse Line Blot; Anaplasma; Ehrlichia; Rickettsia; Theileria tick-borne pathogen; low-cost and low-density-array; Reverse Line Blot; Anaplasma; Ehrlichia; Rickettsia; Theileria
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Abanda, B.; Paguem, A.; Achukwi, M.D.; Renz, A.; Eisenbarth, A. Development of a Low-Density DNA Microarray for Detecting Tick-Borne Bacterial and Piroplasmid Pathogens in African Cattle. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4, 64.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop