Special Issue "Recent Advancements on Arthropod-Borne Infectious Diseases"

A special issue of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease (ISSN 2414-6366).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Klaus Henning
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses, Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Jena, Germany
Interests: ticks; vector competence; vector-borne pathogens; Coxiella burnetii; Borrelia; Anaplasma; molecular vector–pathogen interactions; veterinary parasitology
Prof. Dr. Cornelia Silaghi
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Head of the Institute of Infectology and head of the Laboratory of Vector Capacity at the Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut in Greifswald Isle of Riems, Germany, and Professor for Infectology at the University of Greifswald, Germany
Interests: ticks; mosquitoes; vectors; vector competence; vector-borne pathogens; molecular vector–pathogen interactions; veterinary parasitology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on recent advancements in the diagnosis, control, epidemiology and molecular interactions of vectors and vector-borne pathogens, which are of major public health interest worldwide.

Many arthropods are acting as vectors of pathogens of medical and veterinary importance, such as mosquitoes, biting midges, sandflies, lice, fleas, ticks and mites and many of the transmitted pathogens are zoonotic and of public health concern. Recent developments have shown that arthropods will play an even more important role in the transmission of pathogens in the future as consequence of, for example, climate change, global warming and increasing globalisation, trade and travel. Despite growing research interest in this field, the role of arthropods as vectors and reservoir for several pathogens (e.g. lumpy skin disease virus) is still unclear.

Diseases, which were forgotten in Western Europe, such as malaria, could have their comeback and new pathogens and diseases continue to enter into new areas, as has been shown for Zika virus. On the other hand, the development of modern diagnostic techniques facilitate the early detection of the pathogens and diseases. Altogether, there is a need for more information of current trends in vector-borne diseases. Under this context, the role of ticks as vectors and the understanding of different possible ways by which ticks can transmit pathogens, such as Coxiella burnetti, are decisive for its efficient prevention. As alternative to the aerosolic transmission route, the role of ticks as transmission vectors for C. burnetti should be investigated in more detail to develop better tools for monitoring its occurrence.

The specific subjects of this Special Issue are tick-transmitted Lyme disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, Q fever caused by Coxiella burnetii, other tick-borne pathogens such as FSMEV, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Babesia, etc. and pathogens transmitted by mites, fleas and lice, such as Rickettsia, Bartonella, and many more. We invite papers on these subjects, as well as also on a broader range of subjects, with regards to vector-borne pathogens and their vectors (e.g., on mosquitoes, biting midges, black flies, etc.).

This Special Issue will explore the recent advancements in the epidemiology of pathogens in arthropods from natural and anthropized ecosystems, vector–host–pathogen interactions, vaccine development, diagnostic methods, control and prevention of vectors and vector-borne pathogens, and pest management.

Dr. Klaus Henning
Prof. Dr. Cornelia Silaghi 
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • vector-borne pathogens
  • zoonoses
  • diagnosis
  • molecular biotechnology
  • vector-host-pathogen-interactions
  • epidemiology
  • vaccine development

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Evidence of West Nile Virus (WNV) Circulation in Wild Birds and WNV RNA Negativity in Mosquitoes of the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve, Romania, 2016
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4(3), 116; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4030116 - 21 Aug 2019
Abstract
West Nile virus (WNV) is a zoonotic flavivirus whose transmission cycle in nature includes wild birds as amplifying hosts and ornithophilic mosquito vectors. Bridge vectors can transmit WNV to mammal species potentially causing West Nile Fever. Wild bird migration is a mode of [...] Read more.
West Nile virus (WNV) is a zoonotic flavivirus whose transmission cycle in nature includes wild birds as amplifying hosts and ornithophilic mosquito vectors. Bridge vectors can transmit WNV to mammal species potentially causing West Nile Fever. Wild bird migration is a mode of WNV introduction into new areas. The Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve (DDBR) is a major stopover of wild birds migrating between Europe and Africa. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of WNV in the DDBR during the 2016 transmission season in wild birds and mosquitoes. Blood from 68 wild birds (nine different species) trapped at four different locations was analyzed by competitive ELISA and Virus Neutralization Test (VNT), revealing positive results in 8/68 (11.8%) of the wild birds by ELISA of which six samples (three from juvenile birds) were confirmed seropositive by VNT. Mosquitoes (n = 6523, 5 genera) were trapped with CDC Mini Light traps at two locations and in one location resting mosquitoes were caught. The presence of WNV RNA was tested in 134 pools by reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). None of the pools was positive for WNV-specific RNA. Based on the obtained results, WNV was circulating in the DDBR during 2016. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advancements on Arthropod-Borne Infectious Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle
Development of a Low-Density DNA Microarray for Detecting Tick-Borne Bacterial and Piroplasmid Pathogens in African Cattle
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4(2), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4020064 - 12 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In Africa, pathogens transmitted by ticks are of major concern in livestock production and human health. Despite noticeable improvements particularly of molecular screening methods, their widespread availability and the detection of multiple infections remain challenging. Hence, we developed a universally accessible and robust [...] Read more.
In Africa, pathogens transmitted by ticks are of major concern in livestock production and human health. Despite noticeable improvements particularly of molecular screening methods, their widespread availability and the detection of multiple infections remain challenging. Hence, we developed a universally accessible and robust tool for the detection of bacterial pathogens and piroplasmid parasites of cattle. A low-cost and low-density chip DNA microarray kit (LCD-Array) was designed and tested towards its specificity and sensitivity for five genera causing tick-borne diseases. The blood samples used for this study were collected from cattle in Northern Cameroon. Altogether, 12 species of the genera Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia and Theileria, and their corresponding genus-wide probes including Babesia were tested on a single LCD-Array. The detection limit of plasmid controls by PCR ranged from 1 to 75 copies per µL depending on the species. All sequenced species hybridized on the LCD-Array. As expected, PCR, agarose gel electrophoresis and Sanger sequencing found significantly less pathogens than the LCD-Array (p < 0.001). Theileria and Rickettsia had lower detection limits than Anaplasma and Ehrlichia. The parallel identification of some of the most detrimental tick-borne pathogens of livestock, and the possible implementation in small molecular-diagnostic laboratories with limited capacities makes the LCD-Array an appealing asset. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advancements on Arthropod-Borne Infectious Diseases)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Human Bartonellosis: An Underappreciated Public Health Problem?
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4(2), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4020069 - 19 Apr 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Bartonella spp. bacteria can be found around the globe and are the causative agents of multiple human diseases. The most well-known infection is called cat-scratch disease, which causes mild lymphadenopathy and fever. As our knowledge of these bacteria grows, new presentations of the [...] Read more.
Bartonella spp. bacteria can be found around the globe and are the causative agents of multiple human diseases. The most well-known infection is called cat-scratch disease, which causes mild lymphadenopathy and fever. As our knowledge of these bacteria grows, new presentations of the disease have been recognized, with serious manifestations. Not only has more severe disease been associated with these bacteria but also Bartonella species have been discovered in a wide range of mammals, and the pathogens’ DNA can be found in multiple vectors. This review will focus on some common mammalian reservoirs as well as the suspected vectors in relation to the disease transmission and prevalence. Understanding the complex interactions between these bacteria, their vectors, and their reservoirs, as well as the breadth of infection by Bartonella around the world will help to assess the impact of Bartonellosis on public health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advancements on Arthropod-Borne Infectious Diseases)
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