Next Article in Journal
Genome Wide Characterization, Comparative and Genetic Diversity Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats in Cucurbita Species
Next Article in Special Issue
Aulacaspis yasumatsui Delivers a Blow to International Cycad Horticulture
Previous Article in Journal
Rootstocks Genotypes Impact on Tree Development and Industrial Properties of ‘Valencia’ Sweet Orange Juice
Previous Article in Special Issue
Is There Daily Growth Hysteresis versus Vapor Pressure Deficit in Cherry Fruit?
Article

Characterization of Japanese Apricot (Prunus mume) Floral Bud Development Using a Modified BBCH Scale and Analysis of the Relationship between BBCH Stages and Floral Primordium Development and the Dormancy Phase Transition

Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Douglas D. Archbold and Luigi De Bellis
Horticulturae 2021, 7(6), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7060142
Received: 15 April 2021 / Revised: 31 May 2021 / Accepted: 4 June 2021 / Published: 8 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Horticulturae Ⅱ)
Bud dormancy is an important developmental stage that ensures that trees can tolerate environmental stresses in winter and bloom uniformly in the following spring. Regarding Rosaceae floral buds, exposure to chilling conditions promotes floral primordium development and the transition from endodormancy to ecodormancy. A subsequent period of warm conditions induces blooming. In Japanese apricot (Prunus mume), dormancy progression is accompanied by morphological changes that alter the bud appearance and internal structures. We used a modified BBCH scale and conducted microscopy analyses to elucidate the bud developmental stage of three cultivars with contrasting chilling requirements. The floral bud developmental period corresponding to BBCH stages 51–53 includes the transition from endodormancy to ecodormancy in all three cultivars. Male meiosis and microspore development occurred during this transition in high-chill cultivars, but were detected considerably later than the transition in the low-chill cultivar. A slow or suspended developmental phase was observed only for the high-chill cultivars upon completion of floral primordium organ differentiation, suggesting that chilling may be required to induce floral bud maturation and dormancy release only in high-chill cultivars. Possible relationships among BBCH stages, flowering-related morphological characteristics, and the dormancy phase transition in Japanese apricot are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: chilling requirement (CR); floral bud; dormancy; microsporogenesis; relative growth rate (RGR); BBCH scale chilling requirement (CR); floral bud; dormancy; microsporogenesis; relative growth rate (RGR); BBCH scale
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hsiang, T.-F.; Lin, Y.-J.; Yamane, H.; Tao, R. Characterization of Japanese Apricot (Prunus mume) Floral Bud Development Using a Modified BBCH Scale and Analysis of the Relationship between BBCH Stages and Floral Primordium Development and the Dormancy Phase Transition. Horticulturae 2021, 7, 142. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7060142

AMA Style

Hsiang T-F, Lin Y-J, Yamane H, Tao R. Characterization of Japanese Apricot (Prunus mume) Floral Bud Development Using a Modified BBCH Scale and Analysis of the Relationship between BBCH Stages and Floral Primordium Development and the Dormancy Phase Transition. Horticulturae. 2021; 7(6):142. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7060142

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hsiang, Tzu-Fan, Yuan-Jui Lin, Hisayo Yamane, and Ryutaro Tao. 2021. "Characterization of Japanese Apricot (Prunus mume) Floral Bud Development Using a Modified BBCH Scale and Analysis of the Relationship between BBCH Stages and Floral Primordium Development and the Dormancy Phase Transition" Horticulturae 7, no. 6: 142. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7060142

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop