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Article

In-Vivo In-Vitro Screening of Ocimum basilicum L. Ecotypes with Differential UV-B Radiation Sensitivity

1
Institute of Life Sciences, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pz. Martiri della Libertà 33, 56127 Pisa, Italy
2
Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Università Degli Studi di Pisa, Via del Borghetto 80, 56124 Pisa, Italy
3
Department of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milano, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Federica Blando
Horticulturae 2021, 7(5), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7050101
Received: 31 March 2021 / Revised: 28 April 2021 / Accepted: 2 May 2021 / Published: 7 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Tissue Culture to Horticulture)
Elevated UV-B radiation (UV-B) has been previously reported to affect plant development, physiology, and promote the biosynthesis of UV-absorbing compounds. Sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) is an aromatic herb, widely cultivated worldwide for its use in the food, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics industry. This species exhibits high diversity among different ecotypes based on their geographical locations. There has been little research on intra-specific photosynthetic and metabolic differences in UV-B tolerance across ecotypes from different geographical areas. This study evaluated the protection responses to high UV-B radiation of nine O. basilicum accessions with different geographic origins. Specifically, the changes in chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters and the leaf rosmarinic acid (RA) compound were assessed using an “in vivo-vitro system” in a closed-type plant production system. Our results revealed a significant variation in UV-B protection mechanisms among accessions when plants were treated with high UV-B doses. The accumulation of RA increased significantly by UV-B light treatment in OCI142, OCI148, OCI30, OCI160, and OCI102, with the highest concentration measured in OCI160 plants. This ecotype showed the highest value of the Fv/Fm ratio, 0.70, after 48 h. Recovery of leaf functionality was more rapid in OCI160 than in other sweet basil accessions, which may indicate better photosynthetic capacity associated with enhanced biosynthesis of UV absorbing compounds. This study shows that the biosynthesis of the UV-absorbing compound (RA) represents an effective mechanism to reduce the photoinhibitory and photooxidative damage caused by high UV stress. View Full-Text
Keywords: UV-B stress; photosynthetic performance; UV-B screening compounds; basil; tissue culture UV-B stress; photosynthetic performance; UV-B screening compounds; basil; tissue culture
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mosadegh, H.; Trivellini, A.; Maggini, R.; Ferrante, A.; Incrocci, L.; Mensuali, A. In-Vivo In-Vitro Screening of Ocimum basilicum L. Ecotypes with Differential UV-B Radiation Sensitivity. Horticulturae 2021, 7, 101. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7050101

AMA Style

Mosadegh H, Trivellini A, Maggini R, Ferrante A, Incrocci L, Mensuali A. In-Vivo In-Vitro Screening of Ocimum basilicum L. Ecotypes with Differential UV-B Radiation Sensitivity. Horticulturae. 2021; 7(5):101. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7050101

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mosadegh, Haana, Alice Trivellini, Rita Maggini, Antonio Ferrante, Luca Incrocci, and Anna Mensuali. 2021. "In-Vivo In-Vitro Screening of Ocimum basilicum L. Ecotypes with Differential UV-B Radiation Sensitivity" Horticulturae 7, no. 5: 101. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7050101

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