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Emissions from Swine Manure Treated with Current Products for Mitigation of Odors and Reduction of NH3, H2S, VOC, and GHG Emissions

1
Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
2
Department of Animal Biosystems Science, Chungnam National University, Daejon 34134, Korea
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U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Bushland, TX 79012, USA
4
Faculty of Life Sciences and Technology, Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 37a Chełmonskiego Str., 51-630 Wroclaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 April 2020 / Revised: 11 June 2020 / Accepted: 13 June 2020 / Published: 18 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Big Data for Sustainable Development)
Odor and gaseous emissions from the swine industry are of concern for the wellbeing of humans and livestock. Additives applied to the swine manure surface are popular, marketed products to solve this problem and relatively inexpensive and easy for farmers to use. There is no scientific data evaluating the effectiveness of many of these products. We evaluated 12 manure additive products that are currently being marketed on their effectiveness in mitigating odor and gaseous emissions from swine manure. We used a pilot-scale system simulating the storage of swine manure with a controlled ventilation of headspace and periodic addition of manure. This dataset contains measured concentrations and estimated emissions of target gases in manure headspace above treated and untreated swine manure. These include ammonia (NH3), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, and N2O), volatile organic compounds (VOC), and odor. The experiment to test each manure additive product lasted for two months; the measurements of NH3 and H2S were completed twice a week; others were conducted weekly. The manure for each test was collected from three different farms in central Iowa to provide the necessary variety in stored swine manure properties. This dataset is useful for further analyses of gaseous emissions from swine manure under simulated storage conditions and for performance comparison of marketed products for the mitigation of gaseous emissions. Ultimately, swine farmers, the regulatory community, and the public need to have scientific data informing decisions about the usefulness of manure additives. View Full-Text
Keywords: odor mitigation; sustainable agriculture; air quality; gaseous emissions; environmental technologies; animal production systems; swine manure; waste management odor mitigation; sustainable agriculture; air quality; gaseous emissions; environmental technologies; animal production systems; swine manure; waste management
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Chen, B.; Koziel, J.A.; Banik, C.; Ma, H.; Lee, M.; Wi, J.; Meiirkhanuly, Z.; Andersen, D.S.; Białowiec, A.; Parker, D.B. Emissions from Swine Manure Treated with Current Products for Mitigation of Odors and Reduction of NH3, H2S, VOC, and GHG Emissions. Data 2020, 5, 54.

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